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  #11  
Old 12-12-2012, 02:23 PM
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kevinmzane kevinmzane is offline
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As a player who learned and spent the first 3 years in Kansas, I can relate. I moved to GA and the wheels fell off. Having a secondary putting stance helped most of all. Getting down a heavily wooded fairway is mostly mental, but also requires the right physical approach. I still use a short run up because it is helpful for my timing but I also tend to stay away from very stable discs and try not to get greedy. Picking landing zones and visualizing the line helped me develop a more consistent game in the woods. Over time, your comfort zone will grow and you can stretch out those landing zones to start stringing together birdies. Learn to spot, and take the higher percentage shots rather than try to punch through gaps that you are unlikely to hit.... Even the best players hit trees, or get bad tree kicks often. Suck it up, make a recovery shot that won't put you in more trouble, then forget about it on the next hole. Until you are comfortable in the woods, you can't just force yourself to make strokes up: you just have to take what the course is willing to give up.

I am almost more comfortable in the woods now. It's the wide open that gets in my head from time to time.

... Oh, and a nice flippy, comfortable midrange might help but you'll need to learn it and have absolute faith in your disc.

Last edited by kevinmzane; 12-12-2012 at 02:26 PM.
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  #12  
Old 12-12-2012, 02:43 PM
_MTL_ _MTL_ is offline
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play the first 1/3 of the hole - that is where people get in trouble in the woods - messing up the first part of the hole.

Here is something I wrote about shot selection a few years ago and it touches on the idea of the first 1/3 of the hole.

http://mtlscienfiticdiscgolf.blogspo...fore-shot.html
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  #13  
Old 12-12-2012, 03:02 PM
kerplunk kerplunk is offline
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Learn a forehand! Not only will it help with those darn lefty holes, but throwing FH allows you to look at the target during your throw instead of turning away. Also, there is nothing like FH to escape nasty lies. And, I think FH shots are a bit easier to "carve" through the woods, maybe because of the decreased rate of spin.

As far as your BH goes, the original post almost makes me think you are trolling. What you are doing is almost the opposite of what you should, at least according to the DGCR consensus. You should be keeping your arm speed, but getting rid of the run-up and some reachback.
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  #14  
Old 12-12-2012, 03:05 PM
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swed swed is offline
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Ok this is basic but, aim for an area you want your disc to land. Find a tree and try to hit the tree. Chances are you'll miss the tree but your disc will go where it needs to. As you improve (years later) don't aim at trees anymore cause you'll probably you target at this point.
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  #15  
Old 12-12-2012, 03:08 PM
Chizult Chizult is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kerplunk View Post
Learn a forehand! Not only will it help with those darn lefty holes, but throwing FH allows you to look at the target during your throw instead of turning away. Also, there is nothing like FH to escape nasty lies. And, I think FH shots are a bit easier to "carve" through the woods, maybe because of the decreased rate of spin.

As far as your BH goes, the original post almost makes me think you are trolling. What you are doing is almost the opposite of what you should, at least according to the DGCR consensus. You should be keeping your arm speed, but getting rid of the run-up and some reachback.
Haha! It was a revelation I had when I was sucking it up in the woods a week ago. I realized I'm doing everything wrong! And yes, the FH has become a mainstay in the woods just 'cause my backhand sucks so bad.
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  #16  
Old 12-12-2012, 03:10 PM
Chizult Chizult is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Discwrangler View Post
Follow through on your line instead of trying to aim. When you aim you slow down to the hit when you ALWAYS want to accelerate through the hit.

Hyzer release angles are easier to throw in tight areas too...so less stable discs on hyzer release helps.
Good advice...that is exactly my problem.

So should your hit always be the same, both in the woods and in the open? Should you always have the same amount of snap despite your surrounds, the only difference being what leads up to it?

ETA: Oh, and I've been shopping around for some woods discs. My mids are MVPs and my go to fairway driver is a star Leopard...none of which like being powered down particularly well.
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  #17  
Old 12-12-2012, 03:13 PM
ForTheGlory ForTheGlory is offline
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I select my shot but I've never really focused on the first 1/3 before. Something to practice tomorrow!!

Thanks for the link. _MTL_
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  #18  
Old 12-12-2012, 03:15 PM
Chizult Chizult is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmbrun2 View Post
Do you tend to throw a lot of flex shots in the open course
Actually most of my shots are slight hyzers. I think it developed into that because I don't have to worry on the rip point too much: a little early or a little late, it all lands on the same line.

Someone nailed it earlier...I'm really good at hitting my target, it's the path the disc takes to get there that's questionable.
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  #19  
Old 12-12-2012, 04:24 PM
Matt O Matt O is offline
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My mental approach to tightly wooded fairways: don't aim for the opening, aim for something beyond the opening.
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  #20  
Old 12-12-2012, 04:36 PM
Alcuin Alcuin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chizult View Post
Good advice...that is exactly my problem.

So should your hit always be the same, both in the woods and in the open? Should you always have the same amount of snap despite your surrounds, the only difference being what leads up to it?

ETA: Oh, and I've been shopping around for some woods discs. My mids are MVPs and my go to fairway driver is a star Leopard...none of which like being powered down particularly well.
If you're having trouble powering down, just use a putter. They respond to powering down better, and on some of the longer holes you won't have to power down as much.

I'm not a big fan of powering down, so I throw my putters a lot. I use an Anode and sometimes an old Ion. When I'm on a deeply wooded hole, I'm almost always either throwing my Comet or Anode. I vastly prefer playing in the woods because I don't have a huge arm (it's tough for me to birdie 400' holes on flat ground), but I've got the accuracy.

I also often don't use a run up on holes 225' and under with my putter. When I do use a run up for my drives though, it is very short (I use about half the teepad), but that's because I learned to throw backhand from a standstill first. I definitely recommend working without a runup, and shortening your reachback to focus on accuracy in the woods.
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