#11  
Old 01-11-2013, 04:29 PM
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giles giles is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1978 View Post
Doesn't this all add to additional erosion when the fairway melts to the ground and the only place for the snow along the edges to go is down the fairways. Seems to me compressing would be best...so it melts last and keeps erosion off the fairways.
I don't think so as the ground will still be frozen. I don't know for sure though.
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  #12  
Old 01-11-2013, 04:29 PM
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MDethCKR MDethCKR is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toro71 View Post
I suppose I should just stop here and look for one of the 47 threads that deal with that subject in infinite detail.
I can sum it up. You lose 50' easlily. Nose angle becomes even more key, and stuff that has high speed turn...turns too much. My teebirds and rocs are pretty useless for the usual shots when its under 40 degrees
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  #13  
Old 01-11-2013, 04:41 PM
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Future_Primitive Future_Primitive is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toro71 View Post
It's making me think about how completely different a round of DG would be in REAL snow. Everything, from how you play it, shot selection, everything.

I suppose I should just stop here and look for one of the 47 threads that deal with that subject in infinite detail.
Not to drift to far away, but I think my biggest challenge in the snow is the footing. Whether it is the iced up tee pads, snow clogged in your boot treads or just standing in the snow covered fairway, it is hard to have 100% faith in your plant foot. Sometimes I lose focus thinking about the foot and not the shot, just so hard to really commit to the plant.

Back on track, @OP, which state do you live in with 2 feet of snow? Finding some wayward discs in 5-6" of snow was hard enough, two feet...no thanks.
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  #14  
Old 01-11-2013, 04:58 PM
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duckychucky duckychucky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenThrower View Post
Not to drift to far away, but I think my biggest challenge in the snow is the footing. Whether it is the iced up tee pads, snow clogged in your boot treads or just standing in the snow covered fairway, it is hard to have 100% faith in your plant foot. Sometimes I lose focus thinking about the foot and not the shot, just so hard to really commit to the plant.

Back on track, @OP, which state do you live in with 2 feet of snow? Finding some wayward discs in 5-6" of snow was hard enough, two feet...no thanks.
Microspikes will give you 100% faith in plant foot.

Northern NY, but it started melting fast today, not 2 feet
anymore.

On a side note, I started playing winter rounds with only
a blowfly, first to work more on form, but now its
because that sucker doesn't dive in the snow like regular
discs, even in the deep stuff it tends to stay on top.
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  #15  
Old 01-11-2013, 05:04 PM
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Personally, I LOVE the added awesome factor of deep snow and potentially lost discs.

It just wouldn't be the same with packed snow.

I can see why people would like it, but for me I love trudging through the snow.
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  #16  
Old 01-11-2013, 09:02 PM
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mashnut mashnut is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1978 View Post
Doesn't this all add to additional erosion when the fairway melts to the ground and the only place for the snow along the edges to go is down the fairways. Seems to me compressing would be best...so it melts last and keeps erosion off the fairways.
Erosion is much worse when you get into a freeze and thaw cycle at the end of winter, the ground gets torn up and takes forever to recover. A melt during winter when the ground stays good and frozen doesn't tend to do as much damage.
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  #17  
Old 01-11-2013, 10:36 PM
cjman cjman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDethCKR View Post
My teebirds and rocs are pretty useless for the usual shots when its under 40 degrees
You don't use rocs in the snow? My winter bag has 5 rocs. Don't you look for discs that land soft?

I think playing in the snow can be a great learning experience. The lack of good traction helps me focus on keeping balanced in my follow through. And anything under 300' I throw without any walkup.

The more you practice stand and deliver, the better you'll be when you need it.
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  #18  
Old 01-12-2013, 06:01 PM
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rshrevo rshrevo is offline
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I love trudging through the snow as well. Juke you just need to stay away from the waist deep snow that you got stuck in at Shore Acres a few years ago. still was a fun round first time i had played in what ended up in waist deep snow.
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  #19  
Old 01-12-2013, 06:39 PM
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mashnut mashnut is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjman View Post
You don't use rocs in the snow? My winter bag has 5 rocs. Don't you look for discs that land soft?
I agree, mids and putters are the way to go in deeper snow if you don't want to be searching. I even play with just a zephyr when it's really light powdery snow, it never dives underneath.
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  #20  
Old 02-10-2013, 12:59 AM
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MarkDSM MarkDSM is offline
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I am another that loves fresh unmolested powder. Virgin snow free of tracks other than animals. Still awesome playing additional rounds with only your tracks from the first. I will be bummed out if my area does not get another 5 inch plus storm this year.

Ski grooming does make it more playable though and less stressful.
One course I play shares with cross country skiers and they roll it or whatever. When conditions are right, one can get some wicked skip action and tombstone spiking can be very handy.

Tees as clean as reasonably possible are must though. If enough energy left, scooping out a standing area behind the box is nice too as is clearing stumps and benches.

.. I still call bull****/urban legend on the use of blue chalk thing I saw in some other snow threads.
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