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Old 02-13-2013, 12:45 PM
Rockwell Rockwell is offline
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How I explain disc-flight to Noobs

Here’s what I’ve been telling my friends who are new to the sport:

• Each disc (if thrown flat in calm conditions) has a speed in which it flies straight ahead. (referring to speed moving forward and rotational “spinning” speed)

• If the disc is thrown faster than that speed, it turns to the right. (RHBH)

• If the disc is thrown slower than this, it fades to the left.

• Look for a disc that you can make go its intended “straight ahead speed”.

• Once you have that down, work on making the same disc turn to the right and left on purpose while still throwing it flat.

(From there we would begin working on angle of release, but I feel like that is a good foundation for building upon. And that it is more useful to start from a place where you are doing the control work instead of buying different specialized discs to do the work for you)

Do you find this helpful and accurate or should I tweak my thinking about disc flight?
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Old 02-13-2013, 12:52 PM
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inbounds inbounds is offline
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See if this helps:

Factors Affecting Disc Flight
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Old 02-13-2013, 12:59 PM
Rockwell Rockwell is offline
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Yes, that is all great information and well thought out, but I'm looking for the easiest way to explain it to new throwers. They (and I) Find the numbers that manufactures use to be a bit confusing at first.

I do like the flight charts (colored lines showing flight of disc) that manufacturers use, but that's only accurate if thrown flat at the right speed in the right conditions. So maybe that's how I explain it..."look for a disc you can make match the flight chart. And it's probably not going to be that Boss in your hand..."
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:00 PM
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freezermink freezermink is offline
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seems like you make all the important points without clouding them up with too many details. that should work pretty effectively for beginners.

the most important issue that i always try and instill one that you touched on - a higher speed rating on a disc doesn't mean it'll fly faster; it means you need to get it to fly faster (rotate faster) in order to achieve its intended flight path.

i've talked with so many players that have been playing as long/longer than i have that did not understand this concept until i explained it to them!
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:01 PM
Rockwell Rockwell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockwell View Post
Here’s what I’ve been telling my friends who are new to the sport:

• Each disc (if thrown flat in calm conditions) has a speed in which it flies straight ahead. (referring to speed moving forward and rotational “spinning” speed)

• If the disc is Moving faster than that speed, it turns to the right. (RHBH)

• If the disc is moving slower than this, it fades to the left.

• Look for a disc that you can make go its intended “straight ahead speed”.

• Once you have that down, work on making the same disc turn to the right and left on purpose while still throwing it flat.

(From there we would begin working on angle of release, but I feel like that is a good foundation for building upon. And that it is more useful to start from a place where you are doing the control work instead of buying different specialized discs to do the work for you)

Do you find this helpful and accurate or should I tweak my thinking about disc flight?
I've changed the word thrown to moving, since at different times in a disc's flights it's moving/spinning at different speeds.
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:04 PM
Rockwell Rockwell is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freezermink View Post
the most important issue that i always try and instill one that you touched on - a higher speed rating on a disc doesn't mean it'll fly faster; it means you need to get it to fly faster (rotate faster) in order to achieve its intended flight path.
Nice way of putting it, and yes, an idea that often gets misconstrued.
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:21 PM
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Dan Ensor Dan Ensor is offline
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Faster discs don't lose speed as quickly either. So they get there "faster". They also fall out of the sky "faster".

The thing I was not told starting out was that there's no speed at which you cannot make a disc fly stable. ... I clearly remember thinking I was "overpowering" apes.
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:23 PM
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mashnut mashnut is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockwell View Post
• Once you have that down, work on making the same disc turn to the right and left on purpose while still throwing it flat.
This one sounds a little odd to me, I'm guessing by flat you mean not throwing way up in the air but using the word flat makes it sound like you're saying throw different lines while still releasing the disc without any anhyzer or hyzer angle. To do that, you have to impart off axis torque, something that's difficult enough to avoid for new players as it is.
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:39 PM
garublador garublador is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockwell View Post
• Each disc (if thrown flat in calm conditions) has a speed in which it flies straight ahead. (referring to speed moving forward and rotational “spinning” speed)
That may be true, and it's probably a decent simplification for what you're trying to accomplish, but I don't think that's a great way to think about discs over the long run. I prefer to think of each disc having a range of speeds in which it will act "as intended" or "as flight charts indicate." Some discs will need to be over powered or under powered compared to what flight charts indicate to fly straight.
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  #10  
Old 02-13-2013, 02:49 PM
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ZAMson ZAMson is offline
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Just a slice of my trademarked and patented set of analogies, fine-tuned over several years in the DN pro shop...

Would you put race car tires on a bicycle to make it go faster? No... those tires are made to handle intense, rarely-found, upper-range extraordinary power. If you put pedal power behind those tires, you'll go slower with greater effort than if you used the appropriate tires. Tires match the engine/fuel, they don't provide it. This big fat rim is the same thing as a race car tire... it won't help you any unless you've got the engine and fuel, meaning technique and power.

Tell them this, then let them try throwing a few different speeds of neutral discs. They'll have a better grasp on cruising speed and discing down (although without the depth of theory or vocabulary) than a lot of more experienced players.
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