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Old 06-03-2011, 12:24 AM
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DiscChucker DiscChucker is offline
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Homemade basket - The Pin Wheel

Iíve been meaning to post this for several months now but life has been to busy for me to just sit down and hammer this out. Lately though there have been a rash of threads that people have posted that Iíve felt I could share some knowledge on so I was inspired to get this done.

So without further adoÖ

Iím proud to present my first homemade disc golf basket; The Pin Wheel. This was an incredibly fun project to work on. I donít know that Iíll ever say that itís finished. Iím always thinking of new design elements and tossing around new ideas in my head. Right now, this basket is prototype 1.3. As I modify or add things to the design, the revision number will change.

There were several homemade baskets on this site that served as inspiration in the design of my basket. I tried to incorporate in my basket what I thought to be some of the best design elements in these other baskets. I have a lot of admiration for those fellow discers out there who have taken on the challenge of designing and building their own basket. There are some incredibly creative people out there.

One of the biggest challenges for me is that I do not have the equipment necessary to weld nor do I have the skill set for welding. If I possessed both of those assets, this project would have been a breeze. I would like to one day learn the trade of welding for the obvious reason of creating my own permanent basket design. But until then, I had to make do with alternative materials.

Here are the details of this project.


Objective

To build a homemade basket that meets the following requirements (this is what I came up with prior to the start of this project):

1. Must meet regulation dimensions as outlined by the PDGA specifications.
2. Must use components or parts that are attainable from local and on-line retail stores, hardware stores, secondhand stores, flea markets, garage/yard sales, on-line listings (eBay, craigslist, freecycle, etc.), everyday household items and curbside refuse or other unwanted trash/garbage items.
3. Build process will not require welding, brazing or torch cutting of any kind. Many people donít have the necessary tools or skills to accomplish these tasks. The tools required to complete this DIY project should not include high end specialty tools.
4. Custom fabrication by third party sources can increase the cost of the final product exponentially so this too will be avoided as much as possible.
5. Must be structurally stable and able to withstand a forcefully thrown disc from as little as 20' away.
6. Must be light enough and be able to break down to a point that allows it to be portable. Portable in this case would mean it can be easily transported in the trunk of a car and carried by a single person.
7. Final product must be disc friendly. This means that it will be designed such that there are no sharp edges/points or rough areas that will easily mar, dent, scrape or gouge a disc.
8. Assembly of the final product should require as few tools as possible. Ideally, it should require no tools whatsoever.
9. Total assembly time of the final product should take no more than 10 minutes. Target goal for assembly time for this basket will be 5 minutes.
10. Basket must perform as well if not better than a championship caliber basket.
11. Final product must have at least one feature that does not currently exist on production baskets that are on the market (both permanent as well as portable).
12. Not to exceed $100 in material.

Other notes:

1. There is no restriction on the build time for this project.
2. Obviously this will not be a final, ship to market quality basket. This is, for all intents and purposes, a fun DIY project.

Now check out the pictures.







Hornets Nest #13


We don't need no stinking glow sticks!
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  #2  
Old 06-03-2011, 12:24 AM
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DiscChucker DiscChucker is offline
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More pictures

View from the edge of the circle.


View from tee pad to #13 basket.


Packed up and ready for adventure!


Here's where the center poles attach to the basket when it's broken down for either transport or storage.


Tee snaps...
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  #3  
Old 06-03-2011, 12:31 AM
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DiscChucker DiscChucker is offline
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The ďfinishedĒ product
Iím incredibly pleased with the end result. Honestly, it far exceeded my expectations of what I thought it would ultimately look like as well as how it would perform.


How does it score against the objectives?
1. Must meet regulation dimensions as outlined by the PDGA specifications. I ensured that all dimensions of my basket were in compliance with the specifications as outlined on page six of the PDGATechStandards_61510 document. All measurements were done in metric to prevent human error in converting metric units to the American system.
2. Must use components or parts that are attainable from local and on-line retail stores, hardware stores, secondhand stores, flea markets, garage/yard sales, on-line listings (eBay, craigslist, freecycle, etc.), everyday household items and curbside refuse or other unwanted trash/garbage items. This will become obvious when I outline and inventory the components in a future post.
3. Build process will not require welding, brazing or torch cutting of any kind. Many people donít have the necessary tools or skills to accomplish these tasks. The tools required to complete this DIY project should not include high end specialty tools. I used a table saw and compound sliding miter saw but they are typical Craftsman and Chicago Electric hardware; inexpensive and widely available. All the other tools that were used for this build were pretty basic (with one exception, see next objective). Iíll provide a complete inventory of tools in a future post.
4. Custom fabrication by third party sources can increases the cost of the final product exponentially so this too will be avoided as much as possible. I had four washers (two for this basket and two for my next basket) that needed the center hole drilled out to accommodate the axel of the wheelchair in the upper assembly for the entrapment. All I had available was a cordless drill that didnít have the required torque to drill through the washers. I took these to a fabrication shop to have these drilled. The shop used a beast of a drill press and drilled through the four washers in less than a minute. I could have done this myself at home if I had a beefier drill or even a small drill press. Alas, I took the easy way and fortunately it didnít cost me a cent.
5. Must be structurally stable and able to withstand a forcefully thrown disc from as little as 20' away. Passes with flying colors. This basket has taken some direct hits with some high speed drivers from a distance and it shows no signs of damage.
6. Must be light enough and be able to break down to a point that allows it to be portable. Portable in this case would mean it can be easily transported in the trunk of a car and carried by a single person. The weight of the basket is 30.5 pounds. Itís certainly portable. In more ways than one in fact. It breaks down and consolidates to a form where I can connect load bearing military straps to it and carry it on my back ŗ la quad shocks and a bag. Also, once itís assembled, it can be rolled on the casters. Lastly it can be broken all the way down and rolled on the casters as well. I donít have a car with a trunk to verify if the basket will fit when itís broken down. It fits in the back of my SUV just fine. Iíve even managed to squeeze it in the extended cab of my Toyota Tacoma (not the four door version).
7. Final product must be disc friendly. This means that it will be designed such that there are no sharp edges/points or rough areas that will easily mar, dent, scrape or gouge a disc. Unfortunately, base line plastics and soft plastics donít fair well with this basket. I suspect that the exposed edges of the PVC joints (elbows, crosses and Tís) are the culprits for the gouges Iíve witnessed on some discs. This isnít an epic failure but I am disappointed. My Champion and Star plastic putters have not been affected at all and theyíve seen a lot action on this basket.
8. Assembly of the final product should require as few tools as possible. Ideally, it should require no tools whatsoever. No tools are required to assemble/disassemble this basket.
9. Total assembly time of the final product should take no more than 10 minutes. Target goal for assembly time for this basket will be 5 minutes. I havenít actually timed the assembly yet but Iím certain itís well below 5 minutes.
10. Basket must perform as well if not better than a championship caliber basket. In my opinion, it catches as well if not better than many of the PDGA approved championship caliber baskets that Iíve played with over the years. Iíve encountered very few spits outs through the ďchains,Ē bounce outs from within the basket or those frustrating bounces off the center pole.
11. Final product must have at least one feature that does not currently exist on production baskets that are on the market (both permanent as well as portable). Yep. Iíve covered this one. My favorite ďnewĒ feature by far is the LED lighting that I incorporated within the wheel. Turn on the light and the entire green is lit up! Perfect for those midnight Ring of Fires.
12. Not to exceed $100 in material. I havenít yet totaled up the cost of the materials to construct this basket but I think a ball park figure would put it around $75. This cost is offset as some things are split between this basket and the second prototype that I will be building in the future. For example, the cost of the wheel chair and the irrigation tubing is shared between the two baskets. The other wheel of the wheelchair will be used for the second prototype and I have plenty of irrigation tubing left to build the basket as well.


What?! No metal chains?!
Now, I know there are going to be people chiming in about how they ďcanít play without the sound of chains,Ē or, ďI wonít let my putters touch anything that doesnít have chains.Ē Yeah, well I love the sound of chains too. It truly is a wonderful sound. However, that sound isnít necessarily appreciated by everyone. I would have to say that by far my favorite overall feature of this basket is its lack of sound. I canít even begin to tell you how quite this basket is. So why do I like this lack of sound? There are two very simple reasons. First, I think itís safe to say that my neighbors in my community wouldnít exactly share my enthusiasm for the sound of crashing chains. I have elderly neighbors that live on either side of me. They tend to retire pretty early in the evening. The last thing I want to do is disturb these kind folks. Second, Iím a night owl by nature. Iím always the last person in the house to go to bed. This works out well as the night time hours serve as ďmy time.Ē In fact most of the time that was put into making this basket was done late at night when the family was asleep. Since finishing this basket, itís not been uncommon for me to practice putts or approach shots in the front yard as late as 2:00 am. I simply donít have to worry about disturbing the family or the neighbors. I would NEVER be able to do that with a typical metal chain laden basket. By the way, if anyone is wondering, that is garden hose strung up on cotton rope.


So why not just buy a basket? It would be so much easier, right?
Well yes, it would be easier. But lack of funds and the desire to have a championship caliber basket were my biggest motivators. Iíll be honest; dropping $300-$400 for a basket is not exactly a priority in the family budget. Iíve always enjoyed creating things with my hands and I saw this as an opportunity to take on a fun and exciting challenge. Net naysayers are a dime a dozen and I canít tell you how many times Iíve read peoples comments about how building a homemade basket affordably ďcanítĒ be done. That was another big motivator. Whereís thereís a will, thereís a way and I have a lot of will. This basket serves as my proof of concept that it ďcanĒ be done. Of course, many other people have proven that it can be done with their own creations. Mine is somewhat of a blend of those creations.


More information coming
I really wanted to reveal my creation here and get some feedback so Iím posting what Iíve put together so far for this write up. Iíll be posting more information on the specific tools I used, where I obtained the materials and their respective costs.


What does the future hold?

As Iíve alluded to in this write up, I plan on making another Pin Wheel. This next prototype will have metal chains just like what everyone is accustomed to having on the course. While that will be a significant improvement in many peopleís eyes, I have several other exciting ideas in store for version 2.0. Iím not going to let the cat of the bag but I will say that Iím going to try to incorporate some ideas that we often see here on this site in other aspects of this sport. Obviously, Iím going to address the issue of base plastics getting eaten up. I also have some ideas that Iím toying with to make this basket the most versatile basket ever designed. This last idea is going to be challenging but if I can pull it off, itís going to be pure sweetness.


A special note
I want to send out a big THANK YOU to my local DGCR fellows, jedwards and chain-addicted, for taking time out of their schedules to meet me out on the course on a cold March evening to play test my basket and provide me with feedback.
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  #4  
Old 06-03-2011, 12:34 AM
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SGTP3PP3R SGTP3PP3R is offline
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That is one trick basket. What's the final weight on it? It looks like it travels nicely.
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Old 06-03-2011, 12:40 AM
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simplepmart simplepmart is offline
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Nicely done, you should be proud!!! Way to create!
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  #6  
Old 06-03-2011, 12:48 AM
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DiscChucker DiscChucker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SGTP3PP3R View Post
That is one trick basket. What's the final weight on it? It looks like it travels nicely.
It tips the scale at 30.5 lbs.
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Old 06-03-2011, 12:48 AM
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Jivecody Jivecody is offline
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How does it light up, maybe i missed that between pages 3 and 5? Seriously, best basket i've ever seen, brilliant, you get a blue ribbon!

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Old 06-03-2011, 12:55 AM
ZWood15 ZWood15 is offline
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Absolutely beautiful. I love the PVC use and the LED lighting is amazing, beats the hell out of a glow stick attached to a basket! How is it lit? Multiple LEDs? And what is the power source? Sorry for the numerous questions. I want a basket and you have inspired me to build my own
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Old 06-03-2011, 12:56 AM
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DiscChucker DiscChucker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jivecody View Post
How does it light up, maybe i missed that between pages 3 and 5? Seriously, best basket i've ever seen, brilliant, you get a blue ribbon!

No, you didn't miss it. I used a patio umbrella LED light. The light only uses 3 AAA batteries and they last a really long time before they have to be changed.

I'm working on a list of tools and materials to post. It may be a couple of days before I can get it posted but it will be forthcoming.
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  #10  
Old 06-03-2011, 01:08 AM
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DiscChucker DiscChucker is offline
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^^ D'oh! You snuck that one in before I could finish my other reply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiscChucker View Post
I used a patio umbrella LED light. The light only uses 3 AAA batteries and they last a really long time before they have to be changed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZWood15 View Post
Absolutely beautiful. I love the PVC use and the LED lighting is amazing, beats the hell out of a glow stick attached to a basket! How is it lit? Multiple LEDs? And what is the power source? Sorry for the numerous questions. I want a basket and you have inspired me to build my own
Awesome! I'm glad to hear you've been inspired by my basket. I too was inspired by other homemade baskets I had seen so I know how you feel. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.
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