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Old 02-02-2016, 10:14 PM
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domromer domromer is offline
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Default Have discs really improved that much over time?

I was thinking about all the new and different discs that are out right now, and they all pretty much promise to lower scores, increase distance and take your game to the next level. But has disc technology really improved that much over the past twenty years, or even the past ten?

The two best selling discs are still rocs and aviars...Molds that are pretty old by any standard. I've got a lot of water on my local courses, so I lose a lot of discs and I end up trying a lot of different molds. I keep going back to older molds from the late 90s and early 2000s. Yes that's what I started with so that's what I'm going to be more comfortable with.

It just has me thinking has technology really made much of a difference. Or are we just buying because we like pretty plastic in a variety of colors and stamps...and I don't think that there is anything wrong with that. But If you gave MCBeth a 15 year old bag, would his scores change at all?

Just something I had been thinking about recently.
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  #2  
Old 02-02-2016, 10:21 PM
poemurphy poemurphy is offline
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i would definitely say so. sure they may be similar molds but take a look at the old plastic and compare it to a star or blizzard boss. ive thrown a lot of discs and my distance record is with my blizzard champion destroyer. my farthest midrange make is with a dx shark and farthest and most consistant putter is my star aviar. now i might of started after yall but ive thrown alot (about 2 1/2 hours per day, 6 days a week) and ive thrown a lot of molds and with my evidence proves well
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Old 02-02-2016, 10:21 PM
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@iDiscGolf @iDiscGolf is offline
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His scores would change, yes. But, he would still win.

You go run a course with an Aero and see how you feel not having a Destroyer or Teebird. Or play in the wind without a Firebird.

Actually, maybe simon would win then...
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Old 02-02-2016, 10:24 PM
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Jesterian Jesterian is offline
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLiOsUkU-Vs

Paul finishes this round like.. 8-9 down at Cliff Stevens?

Not sure if that answers your question, but not a lot of people are shooting that out there with modern plastic even.
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Old 02-02-2016, 10:41 PM
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domromer domromer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by @iDiscGolf View Post
His scores would change, yes. But, he would still win.

You go run a course with an Aero and see how you feel not having a Destroyer or Teebird. Or play in the wind without a Firebird.

Actually, maybe simon would win then...
Teebird and firebird... Pretty old molds by DG standards... Was there a point where disc technology peaked? Are we on a plateau right now, waiting for the next great thing to happen after wide rimmed drivers? Does the pdga guidelines keep disc technology stagnet?
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Old 02-02-2016, 10:44 PM
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Cgkdisc Cgkdisc is offline
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My observations over the years.
1. New plastics improved durability slowing flight changes over time.
2. Discs finally maxed out on the sharpness and rim width specs.
3. Blizzard technology allowed lower weights to be made with the better plastics.
4. Clarified what a "disc" means (i.e., has distinct top versus bottom shape, no scalloped or offset rim)
5. Two part fusion technology to adjust rim weight.
6. Allowing LEDs, light sticks and ribbons to temporarily be attached.
7. Electronics can now be permanently embedded.

Some unscientific results:
Players throwing farther but perhaps not more accurately.
Higher percentage of players throwing lighter than max weight discs, especially drivers.
Not sure as many players develop old school hyzer-flipping skill used with beat-up DX discs.
More good players throwing forehand (disc technology may only be a small contributor to this)
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Old 02-02-2016, 10:46 PM
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GripEnemy GripEnemy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by domromer View Post
It just has me thinking has technology really made much of a difference. Or are we just buying because we like pretty plastic in a variety of colors and stamps...and I don't think that there is anything wrong with that.
Mostly this. Obviously a Destroyer will go farther than a Gazelle so you need to take rim width into the equation. That said, A World is a Boss is a Cannon is a Nuke is a Sorcerer . . . . .

Discs have gotten more aerodynamic for distance but no the new Colossus isn't groundbreaking. It's just another widerimjobber. A Fuse is a modern take on tons of similar molds, doesn't make it any better or worse.

EDIT: IMHO
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Old 02-02-2016, 10:51 PM
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DavidSauls DavidSauls is offline
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The new drivers have definitely helped mask the decline in my distance. It's still pretty obvious, but would be more glaring if people saw me throwing my old drivers (which I do sometimes, when there are no witnesses).

Premium plastic was a big change from DX days, in consistency if nothing else---get a disc that you like, it stays reliably like that for a while.

Though I do think the effect on scoring is overrated. They make a difference, but perhaps not as much as some people think.
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Old 02-02-2016, 11:13 PM
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Its like this with any other sport. I've been playing competitive hockey and baseball my whole life and have seen countless equipment upgrades and trends over the years. The best players will still be the best with average equipment. I think that we just really enjoy new gear for the fun of it and like someone said above, the durability is the real cool thing that has improved the most in disc golf.
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  #10  
Old 02-02-2016, 11:51 PM
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Will the PDGA change disc standards if there are no vast improvements in disc technology in the next 5/10 years?
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