#11  
Old 05-24-2013, 02:20 PM
KenTyburski's Avatar
KenTyburski KenTyburski is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Chatham, VA
Years Playing: 5.3
Courses Played: 84
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 931
Quote:
Originally Posted by JC17393 View Post
Be ready and willing to move in order to best spot a disc. By that I mean don't just sit or stand in one spot and watch the discs fly by. If it's headed for trouble, try to follow it as best you can so you can a) find it and b) give the best possible spot if it ends up OB. Nothing worse than a so-called spotter that can only tell the player "it went somewhere over there".

Also, have a copy of the rule book with you, as well as any printed tournament info available (player program, caddy sheet, etc).
Yes, and yes.
Sponsored Links
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-24-2013, 02:28 PM
loki993 loki993 is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Holly, Mi
Courses Played: 8
Posts: 818
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkDSM View Post
..just found this. Seems like a cool guide

http://dgolf.us/docs/Disc_Golf_Spotting_101.pdf
Awesome, Ill be spotting for the first time at DGLO so this will be helpful....
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-24-2013, 02:28 PM
DG_Before_Breakfast's Avatar
DG_Before_Breakfast DG_Before_Breakfast is online now
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by agibson View Post
What you're saying sounds sort of prudent, and may be spot on for an inexperienced player acting as a spotter.

But, doesn't the spotters ruling technically supersede the players'?

http://www.pdga.com/rules/competitio.../111-officials
I don't think all spotters have to be officials though? If you aren't an official, i.e. haven't memorized all the rules and passed the test, you have nothing to say about the rules. You are just there to speed up play by locating discs, mark where you believe a disc went out of bounds, help players know when a Pin is clear so they can tee off, direct traffic when there is a shared fairway, etc.

Edit: Well the guide pdf answered this question, you don't have to be an official to be a spotter.

The one thing I've been told that is slightly different from the pdf guide is that if you just try to stay out of sight as much as possible.

Last edited by DG_Before_Breakfast; 05-24-2013 at 02:32 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05-24-2013, 03:53 PM
KenTyburski's Avatar
KenTyburski KenTyburski is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Chatham, VA
Years Playing: 5.3
Courses Played: 84
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 931
Quote:
Originally Posted by DG_Before_Breakfast View Post
The one thing I've been told that is slightly different from the pdf guide is that if you just try to stay out of sight as much as possible.
I generally didn't stay completely out of sight, but I made sure to stand absolutely still while anyone was making any throws, whether from the tee pad or on approach. Towards the end of the day, when the tee assignments changed from longer to shorter tees, I didn't have as much to do on the second hole I was watching, so I stayed relatively out of sight on the OB line for the first hole.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 05-24-2013, 04:08 PM
ScottyLove ScottyLove is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Years Playing: 3.2
Courses Played: 101
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 820
Quote:
Originally Posted by agibson View Post
What you're saying sounds sort of prudent, and may be spot on for an inexperienced player acting as a spotter.

But, doesn't the spotters ruling technically supersede the players'?

http://www.pdga.com/rules/competitio.../111-officials
Absolutely not! Spotters are NOT officials. You have to take a test to be an official, but anyone can spot.

The rules are always administered by the players and if there is disagreement, an official can be brought into the mix.

Your job is to spot and nothing more. Mark the OBs and help folks find their disks and have fun, but you can only use your eyes... nothing more. No need to interpret any rules whatsoever.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 05-24-2013, 04:27 PM
discoriented discoriented is offline
Bogey Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 67
A good bit of humor is to wear a hard hat. Buddy of mine used to sport one at the BHMO. If you're spotting brushy, wooded or tall grass holes, lengths of construction ribbon with a weight on the end work well to mark shot locations. A lawn chair and cooler is a good idea also. Chilled grapes can work well to impress the lady golfers!
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 05-24-2013, 04:31 PM
NOStheBOSS's Avatar
NOStheBOSS NOStheBOSS is offline
Double Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Bowling Green, KY
Years Playing: 6.5
Courses Played: 53
Posts: 1,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by discoriented View Post
A good bit of humor is to wear a hard hat. Buddy of mine used to sport one at the BHMO. If you're spotting brushy, wooded or tall grass holes, lengths of construction ribbon with a weight on the end work well to mark shot locations. A lawn chair and cooler is a good idea also. Chilled grapes can work well to impress the lady golfers!
During the summer I would love to have my grapes on ice, they sure get hot
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 05-24-2013, 04:47 PM
Pete Kenny Pete Kenny is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Boulder CO
Years Playing: 36.7
Courses Played: 1
Posts: 49
Best advice is don't get hit by a disc.
I've hit spotters twice and haven't been very happy with the spotter either time.

One was standing behind a tree and stepped out just in time to get hit and knock >100 ft off my drive leading to bogey.

One I have no idea what they were doing. They just stood there as my disc drilled them in the chest and it deflected into the OB creek. Another bogey.

Don't get hit, watch every shot, you will be fine, and thanks for spotting
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 05-24-2013, 04:55 PM
takman's Avatar
takman takman is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Years Playing: 13.1
Courses Played: 76
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 138
Read the PDGA Rule book, keep a copy of it with you.
Reply With Quote
 

  #20  
Old 05-24-2013, 07:07 PM
Widdershins Widdershins is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 208
Spotters. Such a blessing. Such a curse.

As a tournament veteran of 20 years, most spotters, no matter how well intended, have been counter productive. Not all. Just most.

Few spotters are experienced players. Most are non-players or newbies who are relied upon to the disadvantage of the players involved. They cannot understand the flight of discs so they therefore cannot judge where a disc flies once it leaves their sight, even if they care at all and make any real effort to know where your disc landed. They do not play tournaments so they don't know tournament courtesy: they move while players throw, they talk while players throw, they try to make rulings having no idea what the rules are, they pick up your disc and move it to where they wish before you arrive.

I would rather have no spotter than a bad spotter. Just like I would rather have no surgeon than a bad surgeon.

Having run many tournaments, including Worlds and Majors, I understand the need for spotters on some holes. These spotters need to be trained. Even then they may be useless or worse.

A great spotter is a joy, a great boon, the person who will help you find your favorite disc and far worth their meager compensation. I have tipped or rewarded great spotters with $, beer and discs.

I have also had many a spotter tell me, after I called out before my throw to make sure they were ready, that they saw no part of my disc, on apparently good shots right over their heads and stalked back to rethrow my drive with a lost disc penalty stroke.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.