#31  
Old 07-26-2013, 05:28 PM
JC17393 JC17393 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainAnhyzer View Post
My post was just to make sure you hook up the deaf DGers. Something as simple as a printed handout goes a LOOOOOOOOG way.
True about the deaf players, but even for the hearing players, a printed handout goes a long way toward avoiding the "I thought you said X at the players' meeting" defense when a player gets something wrong. If it's all written down, no one has a valid excuse for not knowing something.
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  #32  
Old 07-26-2013, 05:55 PM
agibson agibson is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainAnhyzer View Post
Been lucky that there's no rattlers(or other venomous snakes) in NY.
Maybe they're not in Albany, or common, but I suppose they're around.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7147.html
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  #33  
Old 07-26-2013, 06:00 PM
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TheArnoldPalmer TheArnoldPalmer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny_Crunch View Post
Where is the bathroom?
that's what I was thinkin!
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  #34  
Old 07-27-2013, 12:22 PM
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ohtobediscing ohtobediscing is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coupe View Post
Suctioning IS still the recommended field treatment.

And it's unlikely that paramedics or other emergency personnel will carry antivenin, due to the cost (~$2000/vial wholesale), relatively short shelf life (24 months stored at 2-7 C/36-46 F), and the risk of severe anaphylaxis in reaction to the antivenin.
Suctioning IS NOT the recommended field treatment [unless you are more than 24-48 hours from help---even then, its affectiveness is +/-]. The reason is that the average dayhiker was butchering his own leg and coming close to dying from blood loss, starving the tissues of blood and losing the extremity, or spreading the venom even further into the surrounding tissues.
Nowadays its rest-light tourniquet-have someone go for help. Or hike out after the venom has had time to settle in the tissues[about 20-30 min.], so that the venom doesn't race directly into your bloodstream.
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  #35  
Old 07-27-2013, 12:29 PM
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ohtobediscing ohtobediscing is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agibson View Post
Maybe they're not in Albany, or common, but I suppose they're around.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7147.html
Yep. We ran into a few timber rattlers in the scrappy hills northwest of the Shawangunks when we were climbing/camping in the early 80s.
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  #36  
Old 07-27-2013, 07:52 PM
coupe coupe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohtobediscing View Post
Suctioning IS NOT the recommended field treatment [unless you are more than 24-48 hours from help---even then, its affectiveness is +/-]. The reason is that the average dayhiker was butchering his own leg and coming close to dying from blood loss, starving the tissues of blood and losing the extremity, or spreading the venom even further into the surrounding tissues.
Nowadays its rest-light tourniquet-have someone go for help. Or hike out after the venom has had time to settle in the tissues[about 20-30 min.], so that the venom doesn't race directly into your bloodstream.
The "recommended" field treatment seems to change every 2-3 years, so it largely depends on who and when you ask.

Yes, "cut and suck" is out, however, negative pressure suction devices don't require cutting.

NPSDs are controversial (as are tourniquets and pressure bands), in the sense that there is on-going debate over their efficacy. (The conclusions of the 2003 study by Alberts, Shalit, and LoGalbo which found NPSDs to be of minimal efficacy, and which is usually cited as the reason for the negative evaluation, has been criticized on methodological grounds.) Pick four experts at random and ask about NPSDs, and you're likely to get 5 opinions.
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  #37  
Old 07-27-2013, 08:04 PM
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`cjc `cjc is offline
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..can I "flip" instead of using a mini?
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