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Old 09-16-2013, 04:27 PM
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markmcc markmcc is offline
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Traveler vs. Resident - Importance of Signs?

I am a full-time RV'er, and as I travel between destinations I am always on the lookout for courses to play. While I enjoy playing new courses, I am often frustrated by a lack of tee signs, basket numbers, or even a course map. My first time through a course may find me spending more time looking for the next teepad/basket than actually playing the course.

I recognize that this is a "first-timer" problem, and locals aren't affected by it at all. Even coming back the next day myself it is seldom an issue, though I would still appreciate some distance information. I always print out the current hole information/maps from DGCR, but sometimes that info isn't current or correct.

When I rate a course, I generally take signage/navigation into account, and deduct 1/2 point if signs are absent or inaccurate. But again, I recognize that this is likely not even noticed by regular, local players.

So my question: How important do you feel accurate signs are on a DG course and to the DGCR rating? Is it important to you that your local course is "visitor friendly", or are satisfied with minimal/no signing as long as the local players get around ok?
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  #2  
Old 09-16-2013, 04:29 PM
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bradharris bradharris is offline
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Navigation is definitely a one-time issue. But even on courses that I play frequently, I like to have the distance marked. On my home course I can largely ignore it because I already have a good feel for what I want to throw. But on courses that I'm familiar with, but don't play as often, it's nice to have the distance reminder every time I play.
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  #3  
Old 09-16-2013, 04:41 PM
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mashnut mashnut is offline
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To some extent, I see both sides of this issue. I travel and play new courses a lot, so it's a big deal to me that I'm able to find my way around the course. Long blind holes with no tee signs and long walks between holes without next tee signs irritate me when I'm playing somewhere new and it takes a bunch of extra time to get through the course.

I've also been involved in doing course work. I see that for many locals tee signs are the last priority since all the locals who do the work know their way around and don't see the point of signage. To many of those players, the people who come in and play one round and leave aren't contributing anything to the course so there's no reason to cater to them.

The course I currently call my home course has no signage at all. It's very confusing to find all the holes since you have to backtrack, walk across other fairways, and figure out which basket to throw to on a few spots where holes cross each other. I've seen at least 5 groups of obviously new players show up, not know where to start or which is the long or short tee for the first hole, and just give up and go home. I catch them when I can and show them around the course. I went out and spray painted a rung on each basket to point to the next tee, and painted the tee pads with the hole number and long/short. Now many of the locals also don't really care about those new players coming out and crowding up their course, but I see those players as a great reason for the parks department to want to let us put in another course so I think it's definitely worth making courses more accessible to them.
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Old 09-16-2013, 04:45 PM
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Stardoggy Stardoggy is offline
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My usual course never had good tee signs, and it didn't seem to matter at all. Two weeks ago, they got brand new, larger printed signs, and I felt like it made the course seem MUCH more "mature". Maybe I'm just a superficial oaf, but for me it went from a 2.5 course to a 3.5 course, just because of the more professional feel of it.
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Old 09-16-2013, 04:46 PM
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bradharris bradharris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stardoggy View Post
My usual course never had good tee signs, and it didn't seem to matter at all. Two weeks ago, they got brand new, larger printed signs, and I felt like it made the course seem MUCH more "mature". Maybe I'm just a superficial oaf, but for me it went from a 2.5 course to a 3.5 course, just because of the more professional feel of it.
That's another good point. While it may not be something reviewers consider directly in assigning a rating, good signage does help to give a course a more polished feel which can bring its rating up.
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  #6  
Old 09-16-2013, 04:47 PM
roadtrip roadtrip is offline
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Navigation is key. Had a local at Patapsco tell me he thought the "next tee" signs on the course were pointless, I told him they were extremely helpful for me, since I was just passing through.
So frustrating when you hear that a course is something special, but you can't find your way around it. The worst - the proud walk to a parked drive, realizing at the end that you threw to the wrong basket.

Many courses have a map, posted to their dgcr page. That's one of the most helpful features on this site, for the traveling disc golfer.
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  #7  
Old 09-16-2013, 04:54 PM
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demon102 demon102 is offline
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A lot of places I play at are free so I dont care if they have signs and all that but when I pay to get in a park and the place is hell to find my way around I get irritated as the money spent to get in should be used to make the course better. For the free places Im just happy and grateful that there is even a course there. My main place to play now has awesome signage and a total professional feel to it with cement tees and cement sign poles and everything is just on point and its free.

Recently I went to a state park where the signs were old,faded and such and at times it was just hell finding my way around. Whats the point in paying if they dont manage their course?
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Old 09-16-2013, 04:55 PM
pfpro pfpro is offline
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I agree with you Typically, I rate down a half point for bad/missing signage. If there is 1 vandalized sign, I don't, but if all the signs are broken/missing I do. I have a home course (which I rarely look at the signs - but they are nice ones), but I do try to hit new courses when I travel. Good signs (scaled to distance, direction to next tee) keep me from having to whip out the phone to look at a course map. Also, as mentioned above, when playing infrequently on a course where you know where the basket is, but don't have your exact disc or line memorized, it's nice to know distances to help gauge shot selection. Course Designers/Installers - please go the extra mile and make good signs!
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  #9  
Old 09-16-2013, 05:14 PM
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unknown2no1 unknown2no1 is offline
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This is a huge pet peeve of mine because I find it incredibly frustrating when finding the next tee is a chore. I understand that nice tee signs and guide signs can get expensive but a little bit of paint on a basket along with a couple of hand painted plywood arrows to guide you to the next tee goes a long way and is really not very expensive or time consuming to install. I appreciate tee signs to show me where the basket is however they only show a basic view and anyways if I can't see the basket from the tee I'll go look for it anyway to check out lines and things of that nature but next tee signs I think should be mandatory when designing/installing a course.
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  #10  
Old 09-16-2013, 05:18 PM
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markmcc markmcc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadtrip View Post
Many courses have a map, posted to their dgcr page. That's one of the most helpful features on this site, for the traveling disc golfer.
I agree and I'm always looking for the map. The last course I played had an old map for a previous 9-hole layout. There was a very large, faded map in a kiosk, so I took multiple pictures, photoshopped it together into a single map, and enhanced the hole numbers, disc paths, and distances on the map. Then I uploaded the entire thing up to the DGCR site for the next traveler that encounters the course.

Check it out: http://www.dgcoursereview.com/course...0/56ac2660.jpg

I may not be in a position to help with local course maintenance as I am passing through, but I'll upload new maps when needed.
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