Disc Golf Course Review

Disc Golf Course Review (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/index.php)
-   Course Design (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=28)
-   -   Course Optics/Visibility (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=130963)

Doofenshmirtz 05-03-2018 04:12 PM

Course Optics/Visibility
 
I'm interested in hearing about those of you who have designed courses and whether you have taken into account how a hole looks from the tee or how a course looks as it is walked.

For example, in a course that I am designing I have designed some holes based, in some part, on whether and how much the basket is visible from the tee box or near the tee box at least on the par 3 holes. For example, on the first hole, I chose a straight fairway based partly on the idea that when I play a new course, I like to be able to see the first basket from the tee. I think the hole works better that way anyway (because it has OB directly behind the basket and a somewhat narrow gap about midway down the fairway on a 250' slightly downhill hole).

On a couple of other holes basket placement will also be chosen in part on visibility from the tee box. Some of the clearing that is being done is also for the aesthetics of the course because the course is in a very pretty area but has a lot of underbrush that doesn't come into play but gives it an almost jungle feel that I'd rather avoid is some places.

Any thoughts?

chevis 05-03-2018 04:33 PM

absolutely try to get the basket visible from the tee, even if it's only in the winter. navigation is so much easier when you can see the basket from the tee.

MarkDSM 05-03-2018 05:41 PM

Curious why ‘no blind placements from tee’ would be a design concern in regards to navigation.

My rationales for blind is fine if safety is reasonable:
The vast majority of course plays are locals and repeat plays.
Allows for reward of advanced flight paths like huge hard fades, long s-curve flights, and turning rollers.
Walking up fairways to check lines and distances is normal expectation of competive play.
Map and sign reading are part of playing disc golf.
Blind positions allow for flexibility in alernate pin positions which add some variety in replaying a course.

I do agree that hole one being clear sight is good in general. In my perfect world numbers one and two are pretty straight fairways, no big obstacles first 2/3rds of the fairway and no nasty OB. Number two basket near number one tee and parking is ideal. Great for waiting for friends, warm-ups and extra play after a round when traffic allows.

Steve West 05-03-2018 06:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doofenshmirtz (Post 3303717)
... the course is in a very pretty area but has a lot of underbrush that doesn't come into play...

I've never met an underbrush that can be seen and doesn't come into play.

Doofenshmirtz 05-03-2018 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve West (Post 3303752)
I've never met an underbrush that can be seen and doesn't come into play.

You've never been to this course.

DavidSauls 05-03-2018 10:13 PM

Yes and no. Only one (private) course where I can take partial blame for the design. Yes, some holes are designed with consideration for optics---how they look from the tee, and what the view is from the tee. No holes designed to make sure you can see the basket from the tee; for that matter, on many or most, you can't see it.

BogeyNoMore 05-03-2018 11:41 PM

Most "championship caliber" courses feature many (if not the majority of) holes that are blind from the tee... and I'm fine with that. How else do you create interesting and complex holes that force you to hit a landing spot for a approach to the green?

I never mind walking even long fairways on a course I'm unfamiliar with, to figure out just what I'm trying to do, as long as:
1) it really is a good hole.
2) it's obvious where I should look.

Decent signage showing intended route, distance, and pin position... so players know which direction to look, after walking 300' down a 450' fairway to spot the basket.

If the basket's in the thick woods/shadows... PLEASE USE SOME COLOR! for crying out loud... even if it's just spray painting the pole a florescent color.

Searching for plain Chainstars or DGAs on long, heavily wooded courses is a buzz kill.

DavidSauls 05-04-2018 07:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BogeyNoMore (Post 3303849)
Most "championship caliber" courses feature many (if not the majority of) holes that are blind from the tee... and I'm fine with that. How else do you create interesting and complex holes that force you to hit a landing spot for a approach to the green?

Exactly.

It can be difficult to design a hole where there's enough open space to see the basket, but not to throw to the basket along that sightline. Sometimes you have woods with just the right density to see through, but not throw through, but not often.

The longer the hole, the more difficult that is.

denny ritner 05-08-2018 04:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DavidSauls (Post 3303898)
Exactly.

It can be difficult to design a hole where there's enough open space to see the basket, but not to throw to the basket along that sightline. Sometimes you have woods with just the right density to see through, but not throw through, but not often.

The longer the hole, the more difficult that is.

On par 4's and 5's, sure. On par 3's MOST of the time a sight-line can be created. I see a lot of holes where the baskets are intentionally hidden when they could be visible a couple feet one way or the other. I do NOT see the upside of this.

DavidSauls 05-09-2018 07:03 AM

At our course, there are a bunch of par-3s where the basket can't be seen from the tee. None are intentional.

For a few, we'd like to cut peepholes through the thick rough---enough to see through, but not to throw threw. We intend to do so. But there's always a lot more work to do than gets done, and these never get high enough on the priority list.

A few others are the exceptions you cite (by using "most of the time")---the hilly terrain, or large trees, block the view.

You're right that there's no upside in not seeing the basket---but not much downside, either. After playing a time or two, you know where the basket is, and generally know where a decent shot has landed. We generally feel that the better holes outweigh their being blind.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.