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-   -   Brodie Smith PDGA #128378 (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=135632)

ru4por 02-06-2020 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jimb (Post 3545066)
I wasn't sure if you were being serious or sarcastic. Either way I was amused.

I am hoping, sarcastic. I will the guy well, but him on the mic for more than a couple minutes would make me stop watching.

brutalbrutus 02-06-2020 06:13 PM

Get him and AJ and call it Bromez…:|

Jimb 02-06-2020 06:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brutalbrutus (Post 3545426)
Get him and AJ and call it Bromez…:|

Please No! Even I draw the line somewhere. :p

wolfmandragon 02-06-2020 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brutalbrutus (Post 3545426)
Get him and AJ and call it Bromez…:|

That might be the worst duo ever.

No, Ricky and PP would be worse.

aredoubles 02-06-2020 07:58 PM



Brodie and Hannah tie, after 9 fairly easy holes. To me he looks like MA2 level.

ray1970 02-06-2020 08:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aredoubles (Post 3545478)
Brodie and Hannah tie, after 9 fairly easy holes. To me he looks like MA2 level.



Or FPO maybe?

brutalbrutus 02-06-2020 08:30 PM

I haven't watched that one yet but him tying Hannah, isn't that surprising really. SHe doesn't have any real distance to speak of but is pretty consistent for the most part off the tee. As far as him being at an MA2 level, he's still extremely wild off the tee and has only a basic understanding about what disc or shot shape to throw in a given situation. I was playing for roughly 4yrs when I starting throwing 400ish flex shots on flat ground and still never made it above 890. I'd say he's doing pretty well so far.

disco40 02-06-2020 09:48 PM

He's really putting it together fast. 1000 rated in a year doesn't seem out of reach.

Also Hannah seems like such a beautiful soul. Paul picked a winner.

markmcc 02-06-2020 09:58 PM

I am really enjoying this last set of videos. Brodie has good energy and is doing a great job of explaining his "journey". Hannah is sweet and cheerful and a good opponent/partner for him at this point. And Paul is doing some great coaching/discussion/observation. I'll bet that these videos are exposing a lot of folks to disc golf as well as to Paul/Hannah.

And, I'm not finding Brodie to be over the top or obnoxious. He's learning fast and apparently having some fun.

Jdsxvc 02-06-2020 09:59 PM

What's really crazy was the live chat had 4000 people. How many people were watching live tournaments last year?

air show 02-06-2020 10:40 PM

That last video was great. Paul doing color and Brodie learning the game... I found it entertaining and educational. I would enjoy it more however if they were throwing Innova.

Titan037 02-06-2020 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by air show (Post 3545526)
That last video was great. Paul doing color and Brodie learning the game... I found it entertaining and educational. I would enjoy it more however if they were throwing Innova.

A few years too late for that unfortunately

sidewinder22 02-06-2020 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sidewinder22 (Post 3537177)
Bro vs FPO might be interesting.

:popcorn:

Flick Maniac 02-07-2020 02:18 AM

Uhhhh .... Now do one Brodie vs Hannah around the house

Jolt 02-07-2020 04:10 AM

Nice video..i really liked Pauls coaching

I must admit that after +20y of playing i did not know that you was not allowed to touch the basket when you tap out

Jugular 02-07-2020 05:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jolt (Post 3545555)
Nice video..i really liked Pauls coaching

I must admit that after +20y of playing i did not know that you was not allowed to touch the basket when you tap out

That surprised me. I don't think Paul is right about that. At least not by current rules or how I see most tapouts happening, most pros look like they brush the basket with their thumb while dropping it in. Perhaps it's to do with having a pivot point closer to the basket than the lie?

tbonesocrul 02-07-2020 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jugular (Post 3545559)
That surprised me. I don't think Paul is right about that. At least not by current rules or how I see most tapouts happening, most pros look like they brush the basket with their thumb while dropping it in. Perhaps it's to do with having a pivot point closer to the basket than the lie?

Per rule 807.B "In order to complete a hole with a basket target, the thrower must release the disc and it must enter the target above the top of the tray and below the bottom of the chain support, and come to rest supported by the target."

Maybe this is paul's interpretation of "the thrower must release the disc" with the idea being if you are still holding your disc and your disc touches the basket. Then you would probably have a contact point in front of your lie.

TheirTheir 02-07-2020 10:42 AM

Once Brodie truly understands disc selection, disc manipulation and angle control, he will be a force. His form will come quickly, it's the disc iq that takes time. Little things like knowing to throw a flippy fairway on hyzer instead of a stable fairway on hyzer in certain situations is an example of shots that take time to fully comprehend. Having Paul, and eventually other pros, there to explain these things will certainly help expedite this.

Ryan P. 02-07-2020 11:32 AM

I used to agree with what Paul said, but now I'm not so sure. Here's why:
802.07:
Quote:

If the lie has been marked by a marker disc, then when the disc is released, the player must:
Have at least one supporting point that is in contact with the lie; and,
Have no supporting point closer to the target than the rear edge of the marker disc; and,
Have all supporting points in-bounds.
Therefore, if a "supporting point" is defined as including the disc in the player's hand (which I used to think it did), then touching the basket with that disc before you release it would be a penalty. Thankfully, "supporting point" is clearly defined in the rules (802.04.B):
Quote:

A supporting point is any part of the player's body that is, at the time of release, in contact with the playing surface or any other object that provides support.
So the disc clearly isn't included (as it couldn't be defined as a part of the player's body unlike clothing or shoes could be considered a part of it, and even if it could, you'd have to show in that situation that the person was using the basket to support their weight). I can't find anything else in the rules that adds to the discussion, but maybe I'm missing something.

If someone was a few feet away and could put their disc in the basket, point their arm up straight, bend 90 degrees at the elbow, stretch their toes behind their lie, and then say they'd holed out, I'm sure they'd be called. Beyond that, it doesn't seem to be illegal.

Flick Maniac 02-07-2020 12:29 PM

Can someone give the timecode to what part of the video all this rules talk is referring to thatd be great. Sure not going to watch the entire video.

Jolt 02-07-2020 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flick Maniac (Post 3545712)
Can someone give the timecode to what part of the video all this rules talk is referring to thatd be great. Sure not going to watch the entire video.

17:10

brutalbrutus 02-07-2020 12:55 PM

The ironic thing is, we already had this discussion last week in the AnhyzerTV thread in the rules forum.

ToddL 02-07-2020 01:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jolt (Post 3545555)
Nice video..i really liked Pauls coaching

I must admit that after +20y of playing i did not know that you was not allowed to touch the basket when you tap out

He's not quite correct.

Two scenarios where your lie is a foot away from the edge of the basket:

1 - You're reaching into the basket, holding the disc, and the disc is touching the inside of the basket. You release the disc into the basket. This is LEGAL.

2 - You're reaching into the basket, holding the disc, and your hand/wrist/arm is touching the rim of the basket. You release the disc while your body is still in contact with the basket. This is ILLEGAL.

Scenario 1 is what Paul is referring to. It seems close to being illegal, but it's not quite. You can touch the ground or basket or trees in front of you all you want before you release the disc. The only time that matters is the precise moment when the disc is released. If you're holding the disc, and the disc is touching the basket, but then release it, then at the moment of release you're no longer holding the disc any more, so there's no contact in front of your lie.
Did you release the disc first and then cease making contact second? Or did you cease making contact first and release the disc second? As far as the PDGA is concerned, it's simultaneous and we allow it.

It's kind of like the ground causing a fumble in football. Did you fumble first and hit the ground second? Or did you hit the ground first and fumble second? They're simultaneous, so the rules just take a stance on it.


QA-COM-1
Q: If I have a drop-in, do I need to throw the disc in, or can I just place it in the tray and let go?
A: You can place it in the tray, but you must release it and let it come to rest before retrieving it. A release is a required part of a throw, so merely touching the chains or the tray with your putter is not a throw and does not complete the hole.

davetherocketguy 02-07-2020 02:52 PM

I've watched a couple of these Brodie videos finally with Paul and Hanna. He's really not as annoying as some folks are making him out to be. There are guys that show up to my leagues that are WAY more annoying than that and plus it just seems like he's just relaxed and having fun with the game.

brutalbrutus 02-07-2020 03:08 PM

There are times that he gets a bit loud, the video that he made with Simon and Paul that started this has a few of those moments. He also has that thing a lot of new players have where they are overly impressed with great shots by really good players. I am still guilty of that on occasion even after playing close to 10 years. In general, I agree with you, he's just having a good time but I can see where he might rub people the wrong way. Same thing happens with Nikko to a degree. Some guys are just better at keeping their emotions under wraps than others.

HERB brooks 02-07-2020 03:30 PM

Brodie is doing just fine for someone who has played the game for less than 3 months. His ultimate background gives him some good familiarity with the skill set necessary to throw all the shots. For a player with that little experience playing disc golf to tie a 916 rated FPO player is not bad at all. However, that's really not good enough for MPO. 916 rated players can't even compete at local C-tier tournaments, let alone NT and DGPT events where the best of the best come to play MPO. I don't see this going well for Brodie if he is dead set on playing MPO for the upcoming season.

Most people are laughably bad at disc golf when they are as new to the game as Brodie currently is. I expect that he will continue to get better as the year progresses but I doubt he will make a legit push at a 1000 rating any time soon. With time he should become a solid pro, but it may take a few years to get the familiarity with the discs to master all the shots needed to be a legit MPO caliber player. The man looks like an athlete and has a good build for disc golf, but I think people need to pump the brakes on the "He's gonna be 1000 rated at years end" crap.

brutalbrutus 02-07-2020 03:36 PM

I could see him maybe shooting a few 1ks towards the end of the year, especially if his putting continues to improve like it has been. Any player with the distance he already has can get hot and shoot a great round or two if they're making putts. As far as averaging 1k, it would be rather difficult especially if he struggles a little out of the gate.

Its really all just conjecture at this point, since he hasn't even registered for an event yet. He has to actually compete and get a 900+ rating before he can even play in a NT/DGPT event on the pro side. Maybe he shows up and plays AM1 for some?

Jolt 02-07-2020 03:41 PM

He is very productive, two videos in 18h . . .more videos in a week than most discgolf pros makes in a year

ru4por 02-07-2020 04:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jolt (Post 3545847)
He is very productive, two videos in 18h . . .more videos in a week than most discgolf pros makes in a year

Discraft seems to have things figured out.

jakebake91 02-07-2020 06:18 PM

Has there ever been this level of hype for a disc golfer before their 1st rated round? I can't imagine there has been.

disco40 02-07-2020 07:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by davetherocketguy (Post 3545817)
I've watched a couple of these Brodie videos finally with Paul and Hanna. He's really not as annoying as some folks are making him out to be. There are guys that show up to my leagues that are WAY more annoying than that and plus it just seems like he's just relaxed and having fun with the game.

Did you see the one from months ago when he plays with Simon and Paul? It's night and day. He was putting on quite an annoying "bro" performance before, whereas now he seems much more reasonable.

cheesethin 02-07-2020 07:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryan P. (Post 3545688)
...So the disc clearly isn't included (as it couldn't be defined as a part of the player's body unlike clothing or shoes could be considered a part of it, and even if it could, you'd have to show in that situation that the person was using the basket to support their weight).

Paul is wrong, but not by your reasoning. Todl gives the right reasoning in #543.

In the scenario being discussed the disc isn't considered a supporting point, it is considered an object that provides support. See bolded bit below.

Quote:

A supporting point is any part of the player's body that is, at the time of release, in contact with the playing surface or any other object that provides support.
The disc isn't part of the player, it is just an object that provides support. But it doesn't matter, because as Tod says, it isn't providing support at the point of release so is irrelevant.

And also, it doesn't matter how much weight you are putting through a supporting point, if you are in contact with it, it is providing support.




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davetherocketguy 02-07-2020 07:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by disco40 (Post 3545924)
Did you see the one from months ago when he plays with Simon and Paul? It's night and day. He was putting on quite an annoying "bro" performance before, whereas now he seems much more reasonable.

I haven't but I'll bet that people like Paul told him to tone it down a notch or three. Probably was told something like, "Hey that stuff might have worked with your ultimate crowd but it isn't going to work with DG." He might be annoying to some but he isn't stupid.

DiscFifty 02-08-2020 12:22 AM

Really starting to wonder what disc golf content he'll have once the season starts? :popcorn:

Nick Pacific 02-08-2020 09:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jolt (Post 3545847)
He is very productive, two videos in 18h . . .more videos in a week than most discgolf pros makes in a year

Brodie on his own has more Youtube views than the entire Jomez, Central Coast, and Disc Golf guy catalog combined. Go ahead and add in any of the other production companies like Spin TV, Gatekeeper, Prodigy as well.

Ryan P. 02-08-2020 12:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cheesethin (Post 3545935)
The disc isn't part of the player, it is just an object that provides support. But it doesn't matter, because as Tod says, it isn't providing support at the point of release so is irrelevant.

And also, it doesn't matter how much weight you are putting through a supporting point, if you are in contact with it, it is providing support.

Fair, I didn't consider it to be a "supporting point"

However, in your second paragraph above, I'm not sure I agree. You're describing a "contacting point". Why wouldn't the rules say that instead of supporting point? A supporting point would, by definition, be a point that supports. Can you clarify?

ToddL 02-08-2020 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryan P. (Post 3546032)
Fair, I didn't consider it to be a "supporting point"

However, in your second paragraph above, I'm not sure I agree. You're describing a "contacting point". Why wouldn't the rules say that instead of supporting point? A supporting point would, by definition, be a point that supports. Can you clarify?

Supporting Point is defined in 802.04.B: A supporting point is any part of the player's body that is, at the time of release, in contact with the playing surface or any other object that provides support.

Objects that provide support: the ground, a tree, a rock, the basket.
Objects that don't provide support: tall grass, leaves, spiderwebs.

If you are making contact with an object that provides (or, essentially is capable of providing) support, then it's a supporting point. I'd extend that to secondary contact as well - that is, if you're holding an object, and that object is touching something that provides support. That could be you leaning on a crutch that's supported on the ground, or holding a stick that's touching the ground, or holding a disc that's touching the basket.

What does not count as a supporting point is if your arm makes incidental contact with weeds, tall grass, or leaves as you're swinging your arm.

Flick Maniac 02-08-2020 02:39 PM

To me its like putting an UFC fighter in a ring with a boxer... and tell him hes gotta box. No matter how much you train him for boxing, hes got boxers to beat.

Will be interesting to see for sure.

cheesethin 02-08-2020 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryan P. (Post 3546032)
Fair, I didn't consider it to be a "supporting point"



However, in your second paragraph above, I'm not sure I agree. You're describing a "contacting point". Why wouldn't the rules say that instead of supporting point? A supporting point would, by definition, be a point that supports. Can you clarify?

Toddl has covered most of what I was going to say. But a couple of further or clarifying points.

The definition of a supporting point actually uses the word contact:
Quote:

A supporting point is any part of the player's body that is, at the time of release, in contact with the playing surface or any other object that provides support.
'Providing support' is only used in the second clause of the sentence in relation to ' any other object...'.

And the Q&A section users the same language:

Quote:

QA-TEE-2: I threw my drive off a raised concrete tee pad. When I let go, the front of my foot was hanging off the front edge of the pad. Was that a stance violation?

No. The rule states that all supporting points must be within the teeing area at the time of release. “Supporting point” refers to any point on the player that is in contact with the playing surface (in this case the tee pad), rather than to a complete body part such as a foot. The part of the foot that is hanging off the end is not a supporting point because it is not in contact with the playing surface, so no violation has occurred.
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Ryan P. 02-08-2020 11:31 PM

Thanks guys. I see what you're saying, and at the same time, I wish the rules were clearer. "that provides support" is vague, both in the meaning of the phrase and the construction of the sentence.


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