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-   -   The Twitch of the Hips (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=137717)

RoDeO 10-22-2020 01:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RowingBoats (Post 3647191)
Again, there are two options.

1.) You believe this clip shows that in the lateral move into the brace, incidental hip rotation will occur. No one has argued against this, and no one gives a ****.

2.) You believe he is initiating rotation with the rear leg and will continuously rotate from this frame. Everyone has told you this is wrong, in 100 different ways, over and over. You are wrong.

Logically, your 1 and 2 positions contradict. We know that once hip rotation begins it continues without stopping into release of the disc. Therefore, if #1 is true then you must be wrong with #2 and therefore I am correct. If I am wrong, then you must agree that what you said in #1 is wrong.

bsammons 10-22-2020 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3647201)
Logically, your 1 and 2 positions contradict. We know that once hip rotation begins it continues without stopping into release of the disc. Therefore, if #1 is true then you must be wrong with #2 and therefore I am correct. If I am wrong, then you must agree that what you said in #1 is wrong.

Since you are very set in your method then I feel a few questions couldn’t hurt to be asked.
1. Where does the power come from? Of the throw? Be specific, with specific muscle groups and how they work.
2. Why does it matter so much when the hip begins rotation?
3. What is the axis of rotation in your opinion?

RowingBoats 10-22-2020 01:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3647201)
Logically, your 1 and 2 positions contradict. We know that once hip rotation begins it continues without stopping into release of the disc. Therefore, if #1 is true then you must be wrong with #2 and therefore I am correct. If I am wrong, then you must agree that what you said in #1 is wrong.

Like I said, there is a certain sympathy that many people have regarding this topic, because there is an undeniable retrospective 'OH' that occurs. You sure do your best to nuke that sympathy though.

Good luck.

RoDeO 10-22-2020 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bsammons (Post 3647204)
Since you are very set in your method then I feel a few questions couldn’t hurt to be asked.
1. Where does the power come from? Of the throw? Be specific, with specific muscle groups and how they work.
2. Why does it matter so much when the hip begins rotation?
3. What is the axis of rotation in your opinion?

I will be honest in that I don't know exactly the names of every muscle in the body and how they work but when I practice throwing distance I feel a lot in my gluteus and hip muscles. I also feel it in my quads, lower back and lats and deltoid on the throwing side. There's really a lot of muscles involved but those are the ones I feel the most when I throw. My legs are usually the tiredest after throwing. I have noticed that I have gotten larger more defined muscles around my butt, upper legs and hips since I started playing. I don't really feel anything in my arm, I just feel like it's being pulled through.

It matters to know about when hip rotation begins because a lot of new players all arm their disc and have a hard time getting the hips involved. If you get the hips involved at the right time you can feel how the body can pull the disc rather than wonder if your hips do anything. I started pkaying right and threw all arm and had a hard time getting the hips to engage. Then I threw left and instantly felt the difference.

The axis of rotation is around the spine area.

RowingBoats 10-22-2020 02:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3647249)
The axis of rotation is around the spine area.


Here comes round 10. Rodeo's new thread "The Line of the Spine".

timothy42b 10-22-2020 09:34 PM

While this topic is argumentative, it does point out some areas most of remain confused about including me.
The ball golf videos posted recently seem to agree. In a two arm swing lateral motion of about an inch precedes a violent torso rotation with the axis of rotation aligned with the front leg and hip and accompanied by strong torque forces from the front leg.
Exactly how to accomplish that is not clear.
So it's not unexpected there's some misunderstanding.

I suspect the counterbalance of the rear foot may be to resist the side force of rotation.

For me it doesn't matter yet. Concentrating on landing on the front leg feels like it's finally starting to take after a couple years working on it, and I'm getting enough more distance to par some holes I could only bogey. I don't get any of that rotational whip yet, still working.

sidewinder22 10-23-2020 02:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3647161)
This is what I am advocating. It's called hip rotation initiation before brace.

https://i.makeagif.com/media/10-22-2020/f__zGe.gif

Paul doesn't twitch until he is in strong brace with his front hip rising. The only way the butt can turn like that is if you are braced on the front side resisting going targetward pushing away from the target.

sidewinder22 10-23-2020 02:32 AM

https://i.makeagif.com/media/10-10-2020/w_OHo_.gif
https://i.makeagif.com/media/10-10-2020/2MVEPk.gif

sidewinder22 10-23-2020 02:42 AM

Wish the audio was better quality on this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DkP-wbZ_47Q#t=3m20s

seedlings 10-23-2020 08:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by timothy42b (Post 3647360)
While this topic is argumentative, it does point out some areas most of remain confused about including me.
The ball golf videos posted recently seem to agree. In a two arm swing lateral motion of about an inch precedes a violent torso rotation with the axis of rotation aligned with the front leg and hip and accompanied by strong torque forces from the front leg.
Exactly how to accomplish that is not clear.
So it's not unexpected there's some misunderstanding.

I suspect the counterbalance of the rear foot may be to resist the side force of rotation.

For me it doesn't matter yet. Concentrating on landing on the front leg feels like it's finally starting to take after a couple years working on it, and I'm getting enough more distance to par some holes I could only bogey. I don't get any of that rotational whip yet, still working.

All of these movements and drills are not prescriptions for success. Rather, they describe motions that your body wants to use to 1) keep itself balanced and 2) meet the brain’s instructed power and line. Bodies are built similarly, but not identical, so there is a range of motion, or variance of mechanics on either side of the ideal.


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