Disc Golf Course Review

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-   -   The Twitch of the Hips (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=137717)

RoDeO 10-17-2020 10:12 AM

Or, as said earlier, spin the hip. Despite what anyone wants to believe, the hips must spin/rotate in order to throw a disc the correct way.

RoDeO 10-17-2020 09:37 PM

Swinging the heavy hammer vs. Whipping a disc are similar but so different. You try to do both powerfully, but one needs just Brutus strength while the other is about timing and speed. Your arms are really involved in the swing of the hammer. Throwing a disc requires almost no arm power.

UhhNegative 10-17-2020 10:11 PM

"I could have kept swinging that hammer all day long"

That would not be true if he was using his arms heavily in the swing, and HUB (loopghost) is not a Brutus strength type guy. The other gentleman in the video using his arms to swing the hammer can still swing it, but not nearly as efficiently as HUB.

RandyC 10-18-2020 03:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3644995)
Or, as said earlier, spin the hip. Despite what anyone wants to believe, the hips must spin/rotate in order to throw a disc the correct way.

Did I miss something? Did someone say that they hips do not rotate? I belive everyone is saying you do not spin or rotate from your rear leg into the plant.

I suggest you read this multiple times and once you finally come to conclusion that it is impossible to shift from behind by rotating from the front. Come back to these threads. The important thing for you is not to think walk backwards what you are currently doing.

https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forum...d.php?t=127477

Until you get this I dont think we have anything further to discuss. If you are incapable of opening your mind and not letting go of this silly spin theory, there is a perfectly valid 300ft club in facebook called spin & throw where you can feel right at home.

Discette 10-18-2020 09:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RandyC (Post 3645239)

Thanks for the link RandyC.

I love this quote from slow plastic:

Quote:

This is how it feels in a throw...you are balanced over your feet but you drive your rear hip/left butt towards the target (the arrow is meant to be parallel to the ground) while the right arm is turning back. Don't focus on rotation forward, don't focus on shifting quickly, just push that left butt towards the target. When your right arm goes back it's pretty equal/opposite and you should be in great balance.
In other words for those that need something simple and easy for your brain and body to execute:

Quote:

Push that left butt.

To RoDeO: please note that slowplastic describes how it "feels". All these drills are designed to help a player "feel" what the body should do. There are hundreds of ways to throw a disc far. However, there are a few basic throwing techniques that produce the best results for all body types, not just athletic body types. Once you "feel the hit" you should be able to fully comprehend that throwing far doesn't require a lot of physical effort, just a coordinated effort.

RoDeO 10-18-2020 03:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RandyC (Post 3645239)
Did I miss something? Did someone say that they hips do not rotate? I belive everyone is saying you do not spin or rotate from your rear leg into the plant.

I suggest you read this multiple times and once you finally come to conclusion that it is impossible to shift from behind by rotating from the front. Come back to these threads. The important thing for you is not to think walk backwards what you are currently doing.

https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forum...d.php?t=127477

Until you get this I dont think we have anything further to discuss. If you are incapable of opening your mind and not letting go of this silly spin theory, there is a perfectly valid 300ft club in facebook called spin & throw where you can feel right at home.

We just may be completely misunderstanding each other.

My whole point with the initiation of the hip turn is to help others understand that the hip rotation is a dynamic action that begins before weight shift. There are people trying to figure the hip rotation out but don't get it because they mentally believe it isn't initiated until after the weight shifts at the strong brace moment. Thus, they try drills trying to throw from their front leg (one leg) and initiate their hip turn with all their weight on the front leg. It's wrong, it teaches incorrect mechanics and promotes strong arming the disc.

Whether you admit ir or not, every good thrower spins their hips and throws the disc

RandyC 10-18-2020 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3645375)
We just may be completely misunderstanding each other.

My whole point with the initiation of the hip turn is to help others understand that the hip rotation is a dynamic action that begins before weight shift. There are people trying to figure the hip rotation out but don't get it because they mentally believe it isn't initiated until after the weight shifts at the strong brace moment. Thus, they try drills trying to throw from their front leg (one leg) and initiate their hip turn with all their weight on the front leg. It's wrong, it teaches incorrect mechanics and promotes strong arming the disc.

Whether you admit ir or not, every good thrower spins their hips and throws the disc

https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forum...d.php?t=127477

RoDeO 10-18-2020 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RandyC (Post 3645379)

Not sure what you are getting at. I read it.

dreadlock86 10-18-2020 10:58 PM

i'll take a stab at it

movement of the hips does not necessarily mean they are rotating already. further, i think you are exaggerating how much they move/rotate before the brace. from all the gifs posted here, it seems clear to me that the rotation does not begin before the plant toe touches the ground and that the substantial portion of the rotation happens a moment later when the heel plants.

i feel like you're trying to derive principles from non-essential, incidental elements and that's why you're getting so much push back from people here who really do know better.

RoDeO 10-18-2020 11:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dreadlock86 (Post 3645493)
i'll take a stab at it

movement of the hips does not necessarily mean they are rotating already. further, i think you are exaggerating how much they move/rotate before the brace. from all the gifs posted here, it seems clear to me that the rotation does not begin before the plant toe touches the ground and that the substantial portion of the rotation happens a moment later when the heel plants.

i feel like you're trying to derive principles from non-essential, incidental elements and that's why you're getting so much push back from people here who really do know better.

It's not something you feel as much as you see in video playback. Understanding how and when hip rotation initiation occurs is really critical to being able to engage the hips and torso correctly. Im not talking about just spinning the hips out of control. Im talking about that first initial turn and how from there it's a continuous smooth rotation into release. That rotation happens before strong brace. I keep mentioning "strong brace" because that is the moment when everything explodes so to speak. At the moment of strong brace is when the weight is fully shifted, the front hip is coming up, the disc is in acceleration mode and the hips better have rotated ahead of the shoulders at this point. If one gets to strong brace and no rotation from the hips have occurred, then there is no possible way the hips or torso can generate any power and it will only be all arm at that point.

So how much do the hips really turn by the moment of strong brace? From all the frame by frame video I've watched, in general, the hips will have rotated halfway through their total rotation by this point. We don't actually feel this though. It actually feels like we don't really turn the hips until strong brace. The reason being is that our eyes which is inside our head is still looking back and the shoulders are still turned backwards to some degree and it's happening so fast we assume no hip rotation has occurred to this point and then our brain triggers explosion mode and accelerates the disc into release. This delay of the upper body tricks our brains into thinking our whole body was rotating all at the same time. In reality though, our lower half was already rotating into strong brace and continued rotating into release. It's why you see in super slow motion a smooth transition of the rotating hips from just before the front foot touches down all the way through weight shift and into release. The upper body is delayed to intentionally create the rotational torque to build up the power to strongly rotate the upper body into release.


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