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-   -   One leg drill, stupid question. (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=137378)

RoDeO 08-26-2020 12:00 PM

One leg drill, stupid question.
 
So, I've see this one leg drill and decided to give it a try to see what it's all about. Stupid question here but- how is one supposed to draw energy to throw from their hips if the rear leg can't initiate the motion? When I do the one leg drill it seems like all I am doing is balancing on my front leg and using my arm motion (all arm) to pull my hips through. The transfer weight point from the rear to the front brace leg is the hip initiate point which starts the acceleration kinetic chain. I think this is best felt with a baseball swing. Ever try to balance on your front leg and swing a bat for power? Forget it. Even though in the baseball swing your weight gets transferred and braced against the front foot it's the rear foot and leg that powerfully starts the hip and torso rotation.

azplaya25 08-26-2020 12:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3623809)
So, I've see this one leg drill and decided to give it a try to see what it's all about. Stupid question here but- how is one supposed to draw energy to throw from their hips if the rear leg can't initiate the motion? When I do the one leg drill it seems like all I am doing is balancing on my front leg and using my arm motion (all arm) to pull my hips through. The transfer weight point from the rear to the front brace leg is the hip initiate point which starts the acceleration kinetic chain. I think this is best felt with a baseball swing. Ever try to balance on your front leg and swing a bat for power? Forget it. Even though in the baseball swing your weight gets transferred and braced against the front foot it's the rear foot and leg that powerfully starts the hip and torso rotation.


Pretend like you are starting a lawnmower while balanced on your front foot. Can you feel how you can still generate power with your hip?


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sidewinder22 08-26-2020 01:25 PM

Taking it too literal. The feel is that your weight pressure mostly remains on the front leg. There will be some weight pressure in the backswing on the rear foot to post up/leverage against and redirect/transition you back forward.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mpp7ZFLHK90#t=1m35s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DMwiBkvrkg#t=3m33s

https://media.giphy.com/media/kG9dBl...iO3T/giphy.gif



RoDeO 08-26-2020 02:35 PM

So, it's not really a true stand on one leg and throw? I have seen other videos online of people standing literally on one foot and throwing. If it's to teach the feeling of the brace or weight on the front leg then I get it. The only way I can do it and have it feel powerful is to start with my weight on both legs and then initiate hip rotation first with the back leg and then shift the weight forward onto the front leg. If I don't do this then it feels like my arm is pulling my hips through rather than having my hips and torso powerfully pulling my arm through.

ballgolfconvert 08-26-2020 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3623867)
So, it's not really a true stand on one leg and throw? I have seen other videos online of people standing literally on one foot and throwing. If it's to teach the feeling of the brace or weight on the front leg then I get it. The only way I can do it and have it feel powerful is to start with my weight on both legs and then initiate hip rotation first with the back leg and then shift the weight forward onto the front leg. If I don't do this then it feels like my arm is pulling my hips through rather than having my hips and torso powerfully pulling my arm through.

It should be called the finish on one leg drill.

sidewinder22 08-26-2020 03:00 PM

When I see people throwing only on one leg I tell them the same thing I said above. Too literal and not actually listening or paying attention to the details.

It's like throwing from a "standstill" you don't actually stand still statically, you need to shift and move between your two feet dynamically.

sidewinder22 08-26-2020 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ballgolfconvert (Post 3623872)
It should be called the finish on one leg drill.

Or maybe start and finish on one leg and bounce off the rear leg.

Most people try to start all weight back which is death.

RoDeO 08-26-2020 03:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sidewinder22 (Post 3623878)
When I see people throwing only on one leg I tell them the same thing I said above. Too literal and not actually listening or paying attention to the details.

It's like throwing from a "standstill" you don't actually stand still statically, you need to shift and move between your two feet dynamically.

Ah, I see. That makes more sense.

RocHucker 08-26-2020 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sidewinder22 (Post 3623879)
Most people try to start all weight back which is death.

Is this only true of the one leg drill specifically, or true of the actual full throw as well? Obviously during the x-step you are on the rear leg at points, but should the weight *feel* centered over the front leg or hip throughout the throw motion?

During the backswing I have been really feeling like my weight is over the rear foot and coiled into the rear leg... is that wrong?

azplaya25 08-26-2020 06:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RocHucker (Post 3624009)
Is this only true of the one leg drill specifically, or true of the actual full throw as well? Obviously during the x-step you are on the rear leg at points, but should the weight *feel* centered over the front leg or hip throughout the throw motion?

During the backswing I have been really feeling like my weight is over the rear foot and coiled into the rear leg... is that wrong?


Watch the power of posture video from the technique stick, best video out there about this


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