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-   -   The Twitch of the Hips (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=137717)

ru4por 10-09-2020 04:03 PM

You could not have had the same discussion for dozens of posts, in the thread with dozens of the same posts in it already?

RoDeO 10-09-2020 05:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RandyC (Post 3642103)
I am not sure how many times do I need to say this, hips rotate shoulders.

Yes, we both agree that the hips/ torso rotate the shoulders. That's not what we have been debating. What we are discussing is that the hips lead the shoulders in rotation and that rotation of the hips begin before strong brace.

seedlings 10-09-2020 05:41 PM

The hips (wiggle/move/twitch/rock) SHIFT weight to the lead leg, then hips rotate on the lead leg. Weight is shifting ALREADY, then the power rotation occurs. Nanoseconds early/late are outliers, not the rule. There are also stylistic differences between players, but the body mechanics determine the essentials of pull/throw. Players are free to wiggle their whatevers and throw however they please. But until I get the proper body mechanics, I’ll never reach my individual max. If I am rotating my hips before my lead foot is braced, I will always be short of my max.

RoDeO 10-09-2020 05:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by seedlings (Post 3642143)
The hips (wiggle/move/twitch/rock) SHIFT weight to the lead leg, then hips rotate on the lead leg. Weight is shifting ALREADY, then the power rotation occurs. Nanoseconds early/late are outliers, not the rule. There are also stylistic differences between players, but the body mechanics determine the essentials of pull/throw. Players are free to wiggle their whatevers and throw however they please. But until I get the proper body mechanics, I’ll never reach my individual max. If I am rotating my hips before my lead foot is braced, I will always be short of my max.

Well, whether you think you do or not, the only way you will ever throw like every pro player, is to get the hip rotation initiated before strong brace (full weight shift) because that's what every pro does. I started throwing RHBH and I swore I was using my hips. I found out after I started LHBH that I was never using my hips, it was all arm. It's funny now that my right arm is healed that I use it for my layup shots within 250 feet and just basically strong arm the disc. I try to use my hips more on the right but in general it's all arm. Throwing LHBH is super easy and the discs fly really easy. I can actually feel my hips and torso torquing the shoulder and arm and whipping it. You can get to where you can feel that torque loading up from hip rotation as you pull the disc into the power pocket before the shoulders rotate the disc into release.

sidewinder22 10-09-2020 05:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3642132)
Yes, we both agree that the hips/ torso rotate the shoulders. That's not what we have been debating. What we are discussing is that the hips lead the shoulders in rotation and that rotation of the hips begin before strong brace.

These guys are maxing around 300' and clearly rotating their hips before "strong brace moment".
They should be throwing over them mountains according to your philosophy.


RoDeO 10-09-2020 06:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sidewinder22 (Post 3642152)
These guys are maxing around 300' and clearly rotating their hips before "strong brace moment".
They should be throwing over them mountains according to your philosophy.


Let me ask you something- when you first started were you throwing at 300 feet or below or did you just puck up a disc one day and your first throws were 300+?
Also, not to be rude but I doubt you threw well at all when you first started. Oh yeah, you broke your back and leg, I forgot.

seedlings 10-09-2020 07:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3642163)
Let me ask you something- when you first started were you throwing at 300 feet or below or did you just puck up a disc one day and your first throws were 300+?
Also, not to be rude but I doubt you threw well at all when you first started. Oh yeah, you broke your back and leg, I forgot.

Iím interested in your comments on the form in those videos.

dreadlock86 10-09-2020 07:13 PM

haha, move the goal post!

NoseDownKing 10-09-2020 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3642163)
Let me ask you something- when you first started were you throwing at 300 feet or below or did you just puck up a disc one day and your first throws were 300+?

Also, not to be rude but I doubt you threw well at all when you first started. Oh yeah, you broke your back and leg, I forgot.

Holy f**k dude. No one cares how far someone throws when they first started. How does this have anything to do with your philosophy of throwing?

Absolutely no one throws far when they first start throwing. The difference is that some people have the ability to think straight and try and learn regular good form. They will be throwing further as they improve their form. Your philosophy breaks the standard laws of form.

Think about running. You push forward with your leg to land forward with your other leg and push with that leg to land on the other etc... Everytime you land on either leg, the hips swivel to the direction of which leg you land on. You can try slowmotion running.

Now try to rotate to that direction BEFORE the leg has landed on it. Not a lot of power/speed coming out of that now huh?

Sent from my SM-G981B using Tapatalk

RoDeO 10-09-2020 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by seedlings (Post 3642165)
Iím interested in your comments on the form in those videos.

Well, it clearly looks like two new guys learning how to throw. The guy on top is better than the guy on the bottom, he mostly just needs to get quicker muscle firings. The guy on the bottom just needs to watch some pros throwing for a while and start over.


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