Disc Golf Course Review

Disc Golf Course Review (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/index.php)
-   Technique & Strategy (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=4)
-   -   The Twitch of the Hips (https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=137717)

RoDeO 10-16-2020 01:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RandyC (Post 3644646)
Okay. You are cut in half from the pelvis up. The only way to turn your shoulders 90 degrees would be to lift yourself up with your arms. That is because if you do not have hips the rotating system in our body would be the ballsocket in our shoulders but they are not located under the torso thus they cannot really turn the torso unless you lift yourself.

So to say that shoulders turn before the hips is impossible because hips are the ballsocket system that turns the shoulders get it?

Yeah I understand what you are saying- hips rotate the shoulders. In the video of the swivel door he is pulling the door with his arms and his shoulders turn first.

RandyC 10-16-2020 02:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3644648)
Yeah I understand what you are saying- hips rotate the shoulders. In the video of the swivel door he is pulling the door with his arms and his shoulders turn first.

That would be only possible if he was turning from the rear leg, that would be "leading" with the shoulders.

sidewinder22 10-16-2020 04:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3644599)
Just remember in the swivel door drill that the arm isn't pulling the disc like you do in the door.

https://media.giphy.com/media/h4Z6RfuQycdiM/giphy.gif

RoDeO 10-16-2020 08:33 AM

The door drill actually perfectly illustrates our misconceptions with the kinetic sequence. Even though it's a different action of pulling the door to swivel around I can demonstrate that to turn it forcefully and powerfully there must be a transition phase of weight shift between the rear to front leg and that during that transition you need to start turning/rotating the hip before you start to powerfully pull on the door. The hips allow the kinetic sequence to happen as you first engage the hip rotation which then turn the torso and shoulders. The weight shift occurs during that sequence so that you generate the most power. One could begin to pull from the front leg with all the weight shifted, without any hipbrotation, as seen in the video, but there isn't nearly as much leverage or power in that. Basically, you are just using all arm. It's why I said it may be the perfect drill to help others realize the difference between proper hip engagement vs. all arming the disc.

azplaya25 10-16-2020 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3644680)
The door drill actually perfectly illustrates our misconceptions with the kinetic sequence. Even though it's a different action of pulling the door to swivel around I can demonstrate that to turn it forcefully and powerfully there must be a transition phase of weight shift between the rear to front leg and that during that transition you need to start turning/rotating the hip before you start to powerfully pull on the door. The hips allow the kinetic sequence to happen as you first engage the hip rotation which then turn the torso and shoulders. The weight shift occurs during that sequence so that you generate the most power. One could begin to pull from the front leg with all the weight shifted, without any hipbrotation, as seen in the video, but there isn't nearly as much leverage or power in that. Basically, you are just using all arm. It's why I said it may be the perfect drill to help others realize the difference between proper hip engagement vs. all arming the disc.


This is so inaccurate and I donít understand why you preach this nonsense like it is gospel. It this video, he is pulling with his lats while braced against the front side. This is way different than strong arming.
What you are implying is that he should walk up to that door and start rotating his hips as he moves his weight from front to back, while holding on to the door but not pulling it until his weight transfers? Why donít you try that? Find a rotating door and try to swing it using your strategy, then do it the way heís describing in this video, and see which way is more powerful.

Between you with your delusions about hip rotation and Casey with his delusions about molds and plastics, people are going to have a hard time wading through all the fake news around here.

GoobyPls 10-16-2020 11:26 AM

I'm in the middle of blowing up my form and starting from scratch, and decided to visit this forum for a refresher. What the hell did I just read in this thread.

In Rodeo's defense, I will say that there are very rarely some tips from pros that are flat out wrong. For example, Uli put out a forehand video this week where he says to keep the elbow tucked close to the body. Then in his demonstration, his elbow is away from his body, because he doesn't actually throw like that (even though he probably thinks he does). Jessica Weese said and did the exact same thing in her forehand tips video a couple of years ago. I definitely don't think that's what's going on in this thread, but let's not pretend like it never happens at all.


SaROCaM 10-16-2020 11:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3644680)
The door drill actually perfectly illustrates our misconceptions with the kinetic sequence. Even though it's a different action of pulling the door to swivel around I can demonstrate that to turn it forcefully and powerfully there must be a transition phase of weight shift between the rear to front leg and that during that transition you need to start turning/rotating the hip before you start to powerfully pull on the door. The hips allow the kinetic sequence to happen as you first engage the hip rotation which then turn the torso and shoulders. The weight shift occurs during that sequence so that you generate the most power. One could begin to pull from the front leg with all the weight shifted, without any hipbrotation, as seen in the video, but there isn't nearly as much leverage or power in that. Basically, you are just using all arm. It's why I said it may be the perfect drill to help others realize the difference between proper hip engagement vs. all arming the disc.

Let's have a 1v1 tug of war. Let's also assume we have equal strength and mass. I get to shift my weight in the direction I'm pulling and pull from there. You don't get to shift your weight in the direction you are pulling. You have to initiate your pulling with hip rotation. Who will win the tug of war?

RoDeO 10-16-2020 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by azplaya25 (Post 3644711)
This is so inaccurate and I donít understand why you preach this nonsense like it is gospel. It this video, he is pulling with his lats while braced against the front side. This is way different than strong arming.
What you are implying is that he should walk up to that door and start rotating his hips as he moves his weight from front to back, while holding on to the door but not pulling it until his weight transfers? Why donít you try that? Find a rotating door and try to swing it using your strategy, then do it the way heís describing in this video, and see which way is more powerful.

Between you with your delusions about hip rotation and Casey with his delusions about molds and plastics, people are going to have a hard time wading through all the fake news around here.

I was reading on another post where you said you have been playing 10 years and can't feel the brace, hit, etc. It probably occurred to you that your timing and sequence is off. I can understand where if you've been doing something for a decade how hard it is to feel something totally different.

When you start a lawnmower you start with your feet sideways and your torso rotated 90 degrees facing the pull string. As you go to make your pull your weight starts on the back leg and then as you transition to the front leg your hips begin to rotate while your torso lags behind. That load up creates the power to pull with your body not just your arm. It's the same with the revolving door. If you plant all your weight onto your front leg with no initial rotation before you pull you lose all your leverage of your body to rotate and pull the door.

This GIF may better illustrate what I trying to say. Watch the hips rotate through the weight shift.

https://i.makeagif.com/media/10-16-2020/hQm9TQ.gif

RoDeO 10-16-2020 12:17 PM

Here's Sidewinder in his door frame drill. Watch his hips turn as the weight transitions from rear to front foot while his pull and rotation of the upper body lags behind that rotation of the hips. This is what I'm talking about. Your weight doesn't fully shift to the front before the hips turn and you pull. The hips turn during weight shift and the upper body lags behind a bit creating that twist or torque and the it pulls through powerfully.

https://i.makeagif.com/media/10-16-2020/i53RrN.gif

azplaya25 10-16-2020 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RoDeO (Post 3644770)
I was reading on another post where you said you have been playing 10 years and can't feel the brace, hit, etc. It probably occurred to you that your timing and sequence is off. I can understand where if you've been doing something for a decade how hard it is to feel something totally different.

When you start a lawnmower you start with your feet sideways and your torso rotated 90 degrees facing the pull string. As you go to make your pull your weight starts on the back leg and then as you transition to the front leg your hips begin to rotate while your torso lags behind. That load up creates the power to pull with your body not just your arm. It's the same with the revolving door. If you plant all your weight onto your front leg with no initial rotation before you pull you lose all your leverage of your body to rotate and pull the door.

This GIF may better illustrate what I trying to say. Watch the hips rotate through the weight shift.

https://i.makeagif.com/media/10-16-2020/hQm9TQ.gif

Ha I saw you posting nonsense in my form thread and chose to ignore it.

Iíve been opening my hips early and trying to throw off my back leg since I discovered disc golf 10 years ago. Give it another 10 years and youíll be exactly where I am now.

Regarding your lawnmower example - you are saying to start pulling on the string while your weight is on your back leg?


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:43 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.