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  #41  
Old 09-26-2017, 11:49 PM
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Nasty Nate Nasty Nate is offline
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Well, not that I have anything figured out but I played tonight and had some pretty good rips on the forehand! I released them on a good hyzer and I could feel the follow-through with my shoulder. I basically tried to keep the disc on a straight line when I threw and it seemed to make a difference. I didn't have a chance to get any video because it was late and we had to hurry.

I just wanted to say something because even though my putting was terrible I made some pretty good shots with my forehand! Arm feels alright but I could still feel a very slight usage after playing ~20 holes with a handful+ or forehand drives and ups. I probably made like 10 FH shots or something. I ended up -1 from the shorts. I'll do better next time. My friend almost hit a few aces! He had some great lines.
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  #42  
Old 10-01-2017, 09:33 PM
gammaxgoblin gammaxgoblin is offline
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Originally Posted by Nasty Nate View Post
It feels like it's around my elbow... kind of front and back. I'm not quite sure how to describe it. Maybe part of my bicep and tricep? I dunno. Doesn't feel good.
I get this when I try to throw too much with my arm and/or when my arm isn't warmed up. To get past this I've had to learn to throw it more betterly correct. One thing which helps me alot is to really start the forward motion slow, like it feels like it will go 20 feet, bit then accelerate to release. It feels to me what I see when I watch Hokom through. So slow to start then smooth accelerate. Also I've found that dipping my right shoulder, allows me to get my elbow further out in front which also takes some stress off the elbow for me. Fwiw, just my recent thinking.

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  #43  
Old 10-08-2017, 02:52 PM
Primal Primal is offline
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Thanks for the tips.

So I've played a few times the last 10 years or so but only recently have taken it seriously. Really been reviewing form and discs and such. Wanted to first off ask is it weird to have wayyyyy better forehand drives than backhands? (I'm righty if that matters at all)
Idk if it's just more natural for me or if my tech is way better that way but it's pretty clearly a better drive for me. More power, more distance, more accuracy, more everything except elbow pain lol.
Yesterday I uncorked the best shot I've ever had. 320 ft par 3, using a shryke and let loose a beauty. Down the alley with trees on both sides, over the ravine...perfect fade right at the hole too, landed about 10 ft short of the chains for an easy birdie (my first!).

I feel like the longest I can throw backhand is about 250 and I'm absolutely a loose cannon. Mid range, approach and putts I feel confident either way but my backhand is smoother. Driving, I'm just so much better with forehands.

Also about grip, I only use middle and pointer on the rim inside with my middle finger pretty straight. I dont know if there's a better way but that really works for me.
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  #44  
Old 10-08-2017, 03:07 PM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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I think it's a lot easier for many people to break 300' with FH than BH when getting used to things. Especially if you have a baseball or throwing background. Backhand has more distance potential at the top end, and the shot has more consistency/room for error in many instances I feel like. But I agree that it was quicker for me to learn to throw FH over 325' than backhand over 325', relatively. But I do throw backhand farther, and all the top pro's throw backhand farther.

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  #45  
Old 10-08-2017, 03:54 PM
Primal Primal is offline
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I think it's a lot easier for many people to break 300' with FH than BH when getting used to things. Especially if you have a baseball or throwing background. Backhand has more distance potential at the top end, and the shot has more consistency/room for error in many instances I feel like. But I agree that it was quicker for me to learn to throw FH over 325' than backhand over 325', relatively. But I do throw backhand farther, and all the top pro's throw backhand farther.
Fair enough. BH definitely has more power coming from the low body and wind up but I'm lacking the form I guess. I should probably make a video and get some input from veterans on it. There's only about 6 throws on my "home" course that open up longer than that anyway.
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  #46  
Old 10-08-2017, 05:21 PM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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There's only about 6 throws on my "home" course that open up longer than that anyway.
The other advantage I find with BH is it's easier for me to throw a slower disc cleanly. I can throw a putter or straight/understable midrange much farther BH than FH. If I need a dead straight shot 300' I can throw a BH midrange, whereas with a FH I'd have to hyzer flip a fairway driver or something like that and hope it doesn't go too long, turn too much, or show some fade.

The better your backhand is, you'll start to use more putter or mid shots in that inbetween range when you need the straightest shot possible. That being said of course you can throw putters and mids FH, I do all the time, I just feel like I have less room for error if I put more than 60-70% power on ones that aren't overstable.

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  #47  
Old 10-09-2017, 08:25 PM
Primal Primal is offline
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Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post
The other advantage I find with BH is it's easier for me to throw a slower disc cleanly. I can throw a putter or straight/understable midrange much farther BH than FH. If I need a dead straight shot 300' I can throw a BH midrange, whereas with a FH I'd have to hyzer flip a fairway driver or something like that and hope it doesn't go too long, turn too much, or show some fade.

The better your backhand is, you'll start to use more putter or mid shots in that inbetween range when you need the straightest shot possible. That being said of course you can throw putters and mids FH, I do all the time, I just feel like I have less room for error if I put more than 60-70% power on ones that aren't overstable.
I definitely go BH on mids and putts unless there's an obstacle! The drive motion for BH is just foreign to me at the moment.
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  #48  
Old 10-12-2017, 02:50 PM
tmoody tmoody is offline
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Since I've been working on the FH throw as well, I've also been paying attention to various details in how the best forehanders do their thing. One such detail is the extent of the tilt of the upper body over the throwing hand. In the Wysocki video...

https://youtu.be/gSrK8x8OlPc

...the upper body tilt is enough to put a fair amount of daylight between his elbow and torso. For some people this is just a natural athletic way to move, but for others (such as myself) not so much. Failure to get this tilt would, in my judgment, put a lot more strain on the elbow, forcing it to swing like a saloon door.

At the 0:0:10 point in that video, Wysocki's upper arm is pretty much vertical, but his torso is angled away at about 30 degrees. For comparison purposes, if I stand straight up and angle my upper arm 30 degrees away from my body and do a throwing motion, I feel a lot less strain than if I keep my upper arm parallel to my body.

Wysocki holds that tilt all the way through the release and into the follow-through.

And check out Eric Oakley's body tilt here, at 1:55 for example. His shoulder line is almost vertical as his arm passes his body

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQT8X5SVNBY
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