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Old 09-01-2013, 10:44 AM
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Default Muscle Soreness

Hey guys, this question is kind of audience specific. Today I am addressing the players that were forehand dominant for at least 3 years and learned to backhand. How did you deal with muscle soreness? Did you ever have it in your beginning stages when you were really solidifying your form and getting distance? Is it happening because of the lack of form? Or is it something else? I will try to get someone to film me driving backhand so I can get some critique, but man after two rounds yesterday, my right pec and shoulder are pretty sore. Any insight into this?
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Old 09-01-2013, 11:08 AM
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As long as it's soreness and not pain, I'd say it's normal. Like any other sport or activity that's new to your body, it's just not used to it. Cleaning up your form will certainly help. It's more than probable that you're strong-arming your throw which would isolate a lot of that soreness in those areas. For point of reference, I started playing again this July after 12 years of not throwing at all. I was a little sore after for about two weeks, but then I could play 36 holes a day and be tired, but the soreness is gone. I'm 32, and I've noticed more soreness and whatnot doing a lot of things nowadays, but backhanding golf discs isn't one of them. Yet.
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Old 09-01-2013, 11:14 AM
MikeTheBlueCow MikeTheBlueCow is offline
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I may not have been forehand dominant for 3+ years and then switched to backhand... but when I first started playing (end of last summer/beginning of this summer) I started with backhand and had some slight muscle soreness in my right pec. I got over it pretty quickly (as in it stopped getting sore after I played), probably your body just needs to get used to the motion. It could be that you're strong arming it too much and trying to rely on your strength instead of concentrating on putting spin on it, which takes less strength and more finesse and therefore shouldn't really cause much soreness unless you do it an abnormal amount in one day. So I would say it is due to the lack of form, from my experiences, but I don't know if it is exaggerated because of your long stint in forehand, because it wasn't that pronounced for me when I started backhand.
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Old 09-01-2013, 11:57 AM
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I haven't been playing (seriously) for 3+ years but I did play in the 90s for about 3 years and that was all FH. When I started to play again a couple of years back, I picked up where I left off over a decade ago and played FH only. I think that qualifies? Anyway, last fall I started to do some field work and try to develop a BH. Being 39 and being FH only could really wear my elbow out and cut my DG playing short. I remember some soreness in the pec close to the shoulder for a couple or four weeks when in the development stages. The soreness went away after that muscle group became used to the full motion of the throw. I now throw about 50/50 (RHFH/RHBH) off the tee and I don't have any issues with the upper body. However, now that I've started to increase speed and utilizing more weight shift in my BH throw, my right quad group has been getting sore. This is likely due to using that muscle group a lot more than I have been over the last 15 years.

In your case, I would make sure that you aren't strong-arming and you aren't tense. The looser the muscles are, the more flexible they will become and you will be less likely to really damage yourself. Be smooth and focus on technique as much as possible.

When your muscles get sore and the soreness lingers, take a few days of rest to let the muscles heal. Once they've healed, they will be stronger and more flexible.
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Old 09-01-2013, 12:17 PM
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Thanks for the help guys. I do feel like I am strong arming a little, but I am really focusing on increasing my acceleration through my hit point. I picked up an Air lucid trespass and a fury yesterday...it was disappointing to see the lack of spin on the fury to a point where it would go straight with a somewhat hard fade...not really that hard but, it just wasn't getting out to where i wanted it. When I realized that I started to focus on how fast I was trying to accelerate at the right time during my throw. i did a little field work after the rounds and was impressed with how my throw was improving with each throw. I had done this before when I was developing forehand and never had this soreness so I was a bit concerned. I really appreciate the insight into this
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Old 09-01-2013, 12:36 PM
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I too didn't notice any real soreness (unless it was due to 4+ rounds in a day) while developing my FH a couple of years ago. There just wasn't as much full-body movement with the FH. BH, though, a lot more movement and use of dormant muscle groups. It's not difficult for me to hit 300' with a standstill FH (technique, not strong-arm), but for BH, there is a lot more body involvement.
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Old 09-01-2013, 01:06 PM
krooster krooster is offline
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If the soreness is intense enough to come here for advice, it may be related to insufficient follow-through. At the end of a backhand drive your chest should be pointed to the right, with your throwing hand pointing 180 degrees away from the target.

I've had horrible tendinitis in my shoulder for three years after injuring my shoulder playing too much disc golf in one weekend. I attribute the injury to not learning a proper follow-through, though I can't know for sure. I finally started playing again this year, and while it still hurts a little, working on my follow-through has at least made it so I can play a lot of disc golf without the shoulder getting worse.

Dan Beato's right pec drill has been instrumental in helping me learn a proper follow-through. It's linked to in one of the stickies in this forum.
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Old 09-01-2013, 01:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krooster View Post
If the soreness is intense enough to come here for advice, it may be related to insufficient follow-through. At the end of a backhand drive your chest should be pointed to the right, with your throwing hand pointing 180 degrees away from the target.

I've had horrible tendinitis in my shoulder for three years after injuring my shoulder playing too much disc golf in one weekend. I attribute the injury to not learning a proper follow-through, though I can't know for sure. I finally started playing again this year, and while it still hurts a little, working on my follow-through has at least made it so I can play a lot of disc golf without the shoulder getting worse.

Dan Beato's right pec drill has been instrumental in helping me learn a proper follow-through. It's linked to in one of the stickies in this forum.
It's not that bad, just getting insight into it and how I should approach the upcoming week with golf
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Old 09-01-2013, 02:00 PM
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I was FH only for a year or two. When I first started backhand I kept straining my tricep, trap, and neck with terrible form. Since my form has gotten better I tend to get some muscle soreness in the right pec and a few times some bicep tendonitis after throwing a ton.
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