#31  
Old 08-27-2020, 01:08 PM
Central Scrutinizer Central Scrutinizer is offline
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I'm a 47-year-old am masters guy rated around 900 now (probably would be exactly 900 if not for one O.B. throw that led to a six!). In my practice field I have a basket on flat ground at 200' before a large berm goes up behind it. I'll take a stack of driving putters and be up and down on that basket with tap-ins of 20' and under probably 75% of the time, and out of a dozen I'll throw one or two so badly they're outside of c2. I make about 60% of my 30-footers on a good day. My short game is my relative strength.

I'll reliably throw my mids 30' past the basket in similar fashion and efficacy that land in the middle of that upslope berm.

My drivers, unfortunately, aren't as reliable and not much longer than that. When I'm not working 50-60 hours I plan to address this and hopefully be better. Maybe a year from now I'll see palpable improvement. I hope.

20-25 years ago I'd just throw a bomb forehand and be under the pin at 300' with a speed 6 Whippet or something. That ain't happening anymore. I can get my 165 Pro Valk with a forehand to a reliable 250' but I'd better not throw too many in one day or I'll pay the price with some elbow soreness. I save them for when I really need them.

All the good stuff happens 250' on in for me. That's why I took 6th place out of 9 in my first sanctioned event in 14 years a couple of weekends ago despite only missing one putt inside 30' all day when everybody else missed many. They were parking 300' holes with ease.
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  #32  
Old 08-27-2020, 01:12 PM
kinger kinger is offline
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Internet distance, or actual distance?
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  #33  
Old 08-27-2020, 01:28 PM
Dingus Dingus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LateWesternSky View Post
That's an elevated basket. And it's surrounded by OB, which could add a level of complexity to the shot, and could also change the shot type you choose. I have no idea if it was windy at that event.

Change it to a wide open 300 foot hole with a normal basket and no OB, I bet you see the scores change.
I gave you the C1 %, so the elevated basket doesn't matter. I also don't know how the OB changes anything. If nothing else people had to play straight for C1 even more intently as bailing out or going long was OB. I don't know how you could ask for a better case study for a 300' wide open shot. I even selected a favorable year. This year was 76% C1, but otherwise it looks like the C1 rate is usually lower than 70%.

Where you would probably see scores change is when people aren't under pressure to perform at a major tournament. Unfortunately we don't have data for that. I will say this, if you compare a DGPT open player during a DGPT event, I bet they shoot better than most DGCR players playing a casual round. As such I am willing to bet that for the vast majority of people, their 90% up and down range is significantly shorter than a wide open 300 foot hole with a normal basket and no OB
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  #34  
Old 08-27-2020, 03:40 PM
LateWesternSky LateWesternSky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingus View Post
I gave you the C1 %, so the elevated basket doesn't matter. I also don't know how the OB changes anything. If nothing else people had to play straight for C1 even more intently as bailing out or going long was OB. I don't know how you could ask for a better case study for a 300' wide open shot. I even selected a favorable year. This year was 76% C1, but otherwise it looks like the C1 rate is usually lower than 70%.

Where you would probably see scores change is when people aren't under pressure to perform at a major tournament. Unfortunately we don't have data for that. I will say this, if you compare a DGPT open player during a DGPT event, I bet they shoot better than most DGCR players playing a casual round. As such I am willing to bet that for the vast majority of people, their 90% up and down range is significantly shorter than a wide open 300 foot hole with a normal basket and no OB
Is any part of the circle on that hole OB? From what I remember, it is at least close.

OB definitely changes things. Are you going to throw a shot that carries OB the whole way, or are you going to throw the shot that at least gives you a par putt if you end up OB?

Also, and more importantly, those stats are absolutely not from "tour caliber players" or whatever wording you used. Like 60% of the field was rated under 1000.
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  #35  
Old 08-27-2020, 04:05 PM
Dingus Dingus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LateWesternSky View Post
Is any part of the circle on that hole OB? From what I remember, it is at least close.

OB definitely changes things. Are you going to throw a shot that carries OB the whole way, or are you going to throw the shot that at least gives you a par putt if you end up OB?

Also, and more importantly, those stats are absolutely not from "tour caliber players" or whatever wording you used. Like 60% of the field was rated under 1000.
You are really digging in hard on this one. Regardless of how you want to parse it, your notion that a 300’. hyzer in a field is easy to get nine out of 10 inside the circle is ridiculous. If you personally find it easy, good for you. You should tour. The rest of us shouldn’t feel bad because you overachieve.
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  #36  
Old 08-27-2020, 05:26 PM
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azplaya25 azplaya25 is offline
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Originally Posted by txmxer View Post
I am still very new to the sport--I've only played 2 courses total--one several rounds, the other twice. Fortunately, the one I play most is very diverse (Z-Boaz for those in DFW area). A few long open holes, big elevation changes, and some gnarly wooded holes with no true "line". Of course there are lines, but it's really difficult to visualize a 200' line that has to bend around a dozen trees in a specific manner. OTO, it also has a handful of long holes that are fairly open. Far beyond my range. I frequently find myself between 50' and 150' out depending on the hole. Playing skins the other day, I was ~60' out...I threw for the pin and ended up rolling away 30' out. 3 throws from the upshot. Allowed someone to tie me on the hole. I throw a 2 and he has to score from 100+ awkward spot. He laid up and dropped in. I was a dummy.

sooo...when I asked this question, I'm thinking strategy for improving my outcome. Playing smarter. Playing within my skill set rather than swinging for the fences hoping for a great shot.

Welcome to the sport! I live in Round Rock, so I’m really familiar with courses like Z-Boaz. There are so many sick courses in central Texas.

Couple things I’d recommend if your open to some advice. First off, it’s easy to get results oriented when stuff like bad roll aways happen. Roll aways sometimes are just bad luck, you see them happen all the time to pros. Also, I’ve had just as many roll aways happen when trying to “lay up” as I have when running the chains. Point is, don’t let that roll away shake your confidence.

The sticky “Craigs Corner” is fantastic. One thing he talks about is being chain high and on the way down. This philosophy has helped my short game so much. Basically, you want your disc on the way down at the pin. I practice throwing slight hyzers, both forehand and backhand, that fade out at the basket. I practice these shots more than anything besides putting. Also suggest practicing upshots from awkward stances, from a knee, stepping out around a tree, etc.

Last thing - consistency is key in this sport, and especially with putting and upshots. I’d recommend finding a couple of molds you like and sticking with them. There’s different strategies around mold selection but my suggestion would be to just get good with your putter out to 150ish(or more if your comfortable), then find a mold that handles the wind well. For example, I use a dx aviar as often as possible, and just started throwing a Rhyno for windy shots. Some people just go putter then utility driver for the wind. Some go putter and beefy mid. Just find a couple you like and stick with them.
Also, I’d suggest a pre shot routine. I am so money with my approach game when I practice, then I get in a tourney, my heart is pounding, and it all falls apart. Getting a nice pre shot routine and building muscle memory has really helped in high pressure situations.


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  #37  
Old 08-27-2020, 07:58 PM
LateWesternSky LateWesternSky is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingus View Post
You are really digging in hard on this one. Regardless of how you want to parse it, your notion that a 300’. hyzer in a field is easy to get nine out of 10 inside the circle is ridiculous. If you personally find it easy, good for you. You should tour. The rest of us shouldn’t feel bad because you overachieve.
I never said it's easy for everyone to get up and down from 300 with no obstacles. I said that is my 2 shot distance.

Its strange you assume someone who can throw a 300 ft hyzer well also has all the other skills it would take to tour. A wide open 300 ft hole is a rarity at the pro level.
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  #38  
Old 08-27-2020, 08:35 PM
scooby snack scooby snack is offline
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I agree with others advising you to practice your putting. If you need to be within 15 feet of the basket to make 90% of your putts, you have a very small landing zone for approach shots.

Practice longer putts, from 20 - 25 ft. This not only benefits you when facing a big putt, it also increases your landing zone on approach shots from further out.

If you do this and continue working in approach shots, you should be able to shave some strokes off your rounds.

Last edited by scooby snack; 08-27-2020 at 08:37 PM.
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  #39  
Old 08-28-2020, 12:16 AM
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ThrowaEnvy ThrowaEnvy is offline
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Practice everything!!!

The more confident your putting, the harder you can approach. Psyching yourself into "layups" will usually psyche yourself out.

Don't Rambo a laser (or nothing) shot everytime if you can't make your comeback. The trick is knowing your limits and percentages on what you can do, don't take risks your arm can't cash. Pick the flattest line, slowest disc you can throw and the most open line (focusing on first gap).

I like this idea/thread... figure out your landing zone and try to get there and how often can you hit it...

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  #40  
Old 09-02-2020, 01:50 PM
txmxer txmxer is offline
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I played Z-Boaz the other day with the notion of using control off the tee and not overly aggressive on upshots and putts. My scores weren't especially great as I still struggle with consistency (things like grip lock), but I felt good about my round and my play. What we called fairway golf when I played ball golf.

On the long putts, I'm trying to emulate Barsby (where it's an option) to throw a high flattish shot that's sinking towards the basket--similar to azplaya25 description.

Practicing in the backyard, I find I can throw at the basket from 30+ but I probably don't make 1 in 10 and if I'm trying to make the putt (throwing a spin putt that's fairly level), I'm more likely to have a "tester" for the next shot.

I'm sure with practice, I'll get better and this will evolve, but remembering to tone down aggressive play is really improving my game.

From my experience and what I see on here, new players are always thinking about ripping big shots. It's like a right of passage.
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