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Old 07-12-2011, 09:11 AM
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Hey, Chuck. Thanks for pointing out that feature on the PDGA website. I searched by it in my area, and the courses I was thinking of came up and a couple of others I had forgotten, or haven't played yet. One course surprised me when it came upp, but then I thought about the back nine certainly being accessible, just like a couple of others I was already imagining we could play just the back nine or just the front nine.

If my friend really gets into it, I'm wondering if there is any way, realistically, for him to participate in tournaments at those courses. Could there be an "accessibility enabled" division or something like that, where he and a couple of friends play just the part of the course that is accessible to them, using special rules for casual relief?
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  #22  
Old 07-12-2011, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by keith johnson View Post
I'm pretty sure he meant to say sight impaired, not deaf.
Yup, brain fart.

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Originally Posted by prerube View Post
saying "Mentally disabled" is actually more offensive than saying blind now, the PC term of the week is "intellectually impaired"
For the word "blind" depends upon how it is used. It is not taboo like midget, but it is more appropriate to use person first terms, so "Blind dude" is not acceptable where the guy who is blind would be more appropriate. "The guy with a visual impairment" is most appropriate.
If you want to offend someone who is blind or deaf, ask them why they don't compete in the Special Olympics, that will offend them!...I have heard it happen multiple times.
Person first language is a nice thought, and mandatory if you're in academic circles. In the real world, many disabled people (and those who care for them) prefer not to be referred to in "person first" terms. Here's one article on why. I can't find the other article I'd like to share with you where the president of a national group for college students with autism speaks out about wanting to define his own identity (which for him includes being autistic) rather than being defined by the labels academics say are the least offensive.
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:19 AM
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There's no accessibility division accommodation available in regular PDGA events. But it would be simple to sanction as an X-tier and have special rules parameters established for one or more divisions.
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by mashnut View Post
Yup, brain fart.



Person first language is a nice thought, and mandatory if you're in academic circles. In the real world, many disabled people (and those who care for them) prefer not to be referred to in "person first" terms. Here's one article on why. I can't find the other article I'd like to share with you where the president of a national group for college students with autism speaks out about wanting to define his own identity (which for him includes being autistic) rather than being defined by the labels academics say are the least offensive.
I had a student that insisted on me calling him "Blind boy" instead of his name, each person has their own preferences.
You are correct, I have to use this style because I am in academic circles. No one can keep up with how fast PC language is changing, so the best thing to call them is....their name

I do agree with many points in the article, sometimes person first feels very patronizing.

Last edited by prerube; 07-12-2011 at 09:28 AM.
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:27 AM
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he can't get a proper stance
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:31 AM
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I would say anything he can't get a proper stance on call casual. If you are in a wheel chair the actually fairway is considerable smaller because there are only so many places you can go.
you are used to NC courses. Clearly courses like Quaker's Challenge and Renny Gold are not accessable, but a shorter open course like Goucher or many school courses would be easily playable.
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:45 AM
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There's no accessibility division accommodation available in regular PDGA events. But it would be simple to sanction as an X-tier and have special rules parameters established for one or more divisions.
That's too bad. What I'd really like to be able to do is contact the TD of a local A, B, or C tier and say, "we have three people, one of whom is a wheelchair user, and we'd like to form this division in your tournament."

If the PDGA made tournaments accessible to wheelchair users in a way that allowed them to compete with non-wheelchair users on equal and fair terms, that would make disc golf even more the perfect sport. And who knows how many players would come out of the woodwork?

I imagine a TD who really wants to could schedule an X-tier simultaneously with his or her A or B tier, but that isn't something that can be done the morning of the tournament. Nor would the TD be required under the rules to hold the X-tier, as he or she would be required to permit a division if three or more players wanted it.
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Old 07-12-2011, 09:53 AM
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a course that is accessible is often not tournament caliber. Every sport has issued trying to even the playing field. Right now track and feild is trying to figure out how to do it since in the 100 meter dash an athlete in a wheelchair has no chance, but in the 2 mile the wheelchair athlete will win by 2 full minutes.
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Old 07-12-2011, 10:04 AM
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The PDGA already allows more physically challenged players to compete in the same division as those less physically challenged simply based on their overall skill/rating. For example, we have a one legged player in Minnesota and another GM player with poor eyesight played in Am Worlds for several years with his nephew providing a line using his voice. These players compete under the same course rules as others in their division.

I don't see any sport making rule accommodations for some people and not others competing in the same division other than score handicaps which can be established in advance (i.e. USDGC 2011). The spectrum of physical challenges each player might present would make this difficult to judge for TDs (Bobby isn't challenged enough to get the special relief rules but Billy does get to use them). However, I'm suggesting that having special rules for a division where everyone is say wheelchair bound would be possible and more fair.
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  #30  
Old 07-12-2011, 10:41 AM
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allowing the voice line or putting a beeper in a basket are great modifications. Other players may feel it is a distraction, but really it is no different than birds chirping or sirens going off in the distance.
My profession is teaching sports to kids with disabilities and I adapt just about any sport for any disability. Disc golf is actually one of the harder sports to modify because:
1. the terrain is set, I can not remove dirt trails and dense uphil fairways. (obviously my school course is 90% flat and wide open)
2. adding a beeper to a disc changes the flight path significantly. It is often easier to let the student throw, then place the beeper on the lie.
3. Kids with more severe disabilities have trouble crossing the midline of the body to throw a frisbee. Others have grip issues. If you break down disc golf into easier skills eventually all you get is tossing a frisbee.
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