#11  
Old Yesterday, 08:17 AM
biscoe biscoe is online now
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: spotsylvania, va
Years Playing: 24.4
Courses Played: 94
Posts: 6,529
Niced 1,844 Times in 789 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nnewms View Post
When designing a course, is this a thought or does it just kind of happen as you survey and understand the land you are working with? Just curious thanks for the input!
It is a thought but not a primary directive.

Directive 1 is to design for the wants/needs/intended audience of the customer/land owner. After that the land gets to tell you what to do so to speak.

Thrown Disc Golf has 5 courses currently in process- their pars will wind up being (give or take a stroke or two) 56, 60, 61, 65 and 67. Given ideal property and allowed to do what I please I would tend to land in the 63-65 area more often than not. Of course few properties are ideal and there is seldom a design without some sort of other concerns encroaching upon it.
Sponsored Links

Niced: (2)
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old Yesterday, 06:39 PM
Steve West Steve West is offline
Par Delusionary
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Years Playing: 45.4
Courses Played: 360
Posts: 4,940
Niced 1,656 Times in 814 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidSauls View Post
He just posted so he could throw that Par 2 in there.
Maaaybe. Now I suppose I have to make something up to justify the rest of that post. So, here goes:

Most of the holes should be par 3 (or easier). That's what makes the game fun.

I like to have an ace run on the course. You don't have to call it a par 2, but "Par 2" induces a special kind of stress on players - like the drop on a free fall ride, they hate to see it coming, but giggle when it's over.

Par 4s and 5s (if there is room) offer a whole different thought process than "always try to land by the target". They will make the course feel like a real grown-up serious course. Even if they are Rec-level 4s and 5s on a Rec course. At least one hole of these holes should give players a chance to throw really far. These holes should provide lots of scramble opportunities. That's where real shot creativity is learned.

After about 63 throws, the scales tip from looking forward to throwing more to counting down how many throws until you are done. Only paid pros should be asked to do more. Players will also skip longer courses when time is short.

Niced: (3)
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old Yesterday, 08:03 PM
keepitfun keepitfun is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 9
Niced 2 Times in 2 Posts
Default

I have always thought the sweet spot is somewhere in the low to mid 60s.....land definitely dictates the course but once you get close to 70 and above it gets to be a grind with not enough non-grinders sprinkled in to keep it fun and to keep the round interesting

once you hit par 68 it becomes a battle of attrition and weathering bogies instead of a battle of birdies and scoring
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old Today, 06:14 AM
rhatton1's Avatar
rhatton1 rhatton1 is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Years Playing: 12.5
Courses Played: 27
Posts: 878
Niced 496 Times in 203 Posts
Default

As stated above, every land and design is different but we're talking hypotheticals so my ideal is high 60's. This is for a tournament layout course and for players that want to test their abilities and play for the challenge of Disc Golf.

I'd have a couple of par 5's in there and more 4's than threes, i'd have at least one hole that Steve calls a par 2 and I call a must get par 3. I like multi shot holes though, I find them more fun than 3's if they are well designed with a distinct challenge set on each throw. I like more chances to throw great shots.

As there aren't many serious golfers or tournament level players out there, you have to design for the majority so my ideal course of 18 holes would probably be split into two loops of 12 or even 18 holes, or most likely one loop of 12 and one 18. The twelve would retain some 4's and split the par 5 and at least one four into 3's (one of the Gold threes might get redesignated into a 4 for the level of play) and the 18 would split all the 5's and 4's into distinct par threes. The 18 would be set with par around 920.

The 12 would be looking more at 950 rated The 18 would be a fun birdie fest for a good player but a challenge to the majority with chances of 2's but lots of places to mess up. I would also have a 9 or 12 hole beginner layout somewhere near the clubhouse, which would still be fun to play for experienced players.

This gives more players more chances to be on the course at the same time and gives them a helluva variety over the same bit of land. There would be a red/green, White, Blue and Gold course to play , or a mix of the three big ones. I really like hearing the question "which layout should we play today" variety is the spice of life and everyone has different time constraints and holes that appeal/don't appeal to them.

As long as planning permission is successful I'm making one like this at the moment, i'm excited to see how it comes out and Steve will be glad to hear the Golds are aimed to be set for 1000 rated play and not "British" par I suspect the majority of rounds will be played on the British par layouts though.
Reply With Quote
 

  #15  
Old Today, 06:22 AM
DavidSauls's Avatar
DavidSauls DavidSauls is online now
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Newberry, SC
Years Playing: 24.3
Courses Played: 125
Posts: 15,095
Niced 3,290 Times in 1,455 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidSauls View Post
He just posted so he could throw that Par 2 in there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve West View Post
Maaaybe. Now I suppose I have to make something up to justify the rest of that post. So, here goes:

Most of the holes should be par 3 (or easier). That's what makes the game fun.

I like to have an ace run on the course. You don't have to call it a par 2, but "Par 2" induces a special kind of stress on players - like the drop on a free fall ride, they hate to see it coming, but giggle when it's over.

Par 4s and 5s (if there is room) offer a whole different thought process than "always try to land by the target". They will make the course feel like a real grown-up serious course. Even if they are Rec-level 4s and 5s on a Rec course. At least one hole of these holes should give players a chance to throw really far. These holes should provide lots of scramble opportunities. That's where real shot creativity is learned.

After about 63 throws, the scales tip from looking forward to throwing more to counting down how many throws until you are done. Only paid pros should be asked to do more. Players will also skip longer courses when time is short.
Mine was a lighthearted jab, because of the time you've spent elsewhere are par 2, that you just had to stick it in. I agree with you about them.

I also agree with your post here, and particularly that it's good to have one or two holes where there's pressure to get a 2. By whatever name.

Except skipping longer courses when time is short. Well, that part's true, of course, but whether it's a consideration depends on the intent of the owner. I think people will travel further to play longer courses, too. They fit a different niche in our world.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How is Par For a Hole Determined? greg_lange Course Design 55 09-10-2019 10:56 AM
Most strokes under par in an 18 hole round Twmccoy General Disc Golf Chat 31 02-22-2017 11:16 AM
Poorly designed par 4,5,and par 6 holes and bad high par courses optidiscic Course Design 159 09-12-2014 10:53 AM
Deuce or die par 3's or play for par, par 3's? BrotherDave Disc Golf Courses 14 04-29-2011 12:04 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.