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Old 06-02-2021, 06:36 PM
crdiscgolf79 crdiscgolf79 is offline
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Default Question about inbounds disc golf flight ratings

http://www.inboundsdiscgolf.com/


When it refers to the amount of total feet that can be thrown if the disc is thrown as it should (for example take the teebird.....350 feet is around the upper limits of this disc) are these ratings referring to backhand distance or do they also include forehand distance as well?

I thought I read somewhere on this site in an older thread (I think sidewinder posted it) that the amount of the same type of effort to hit a backhand line (say 400 feet) is about the same amount of effort to hit a 300 foot forehand line. If this is true, would you minus about 100 feet off the inbounds flight chart for forehand throws?
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Old 06-02-2021, 07:31 PM
crdiscgolf79 crdiscgolf79 is offline
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Ok, looking at it again, it also notes if throwing for LHBH/RHFH or RHBH/LHFH.....so I would assume in theory you can get the same distance either way.

But I have mostly read the thought process is you can get more distance out of backhand compared to forehand because you can get more body into the throw and more rotation. Maybe it just depends on the person, form, and weather conditions.
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Old 06-03-2021, 01:32 PM
BillFleming BillFleming is offline
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I don't know that there is an exact distance difference....but I have seen enough videos where it does back up that all things equal (same disc, same speed, etc) a backhand goes farther than a forehand.

I seem to recall the reason was torque and that you get more torque on a backhand throw than you do on a forehand. It may also be due to the 'pull' length. A backhand throw travels a farther distance from the reachback to the point of release. A forehand is more of a wrist snap.
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Old 06-03-2021, 01:40 PM
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Horsman Horsman is offline
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Old 06-03-2021, 02:05 PM
BillFleming BillFleming is offline
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Ooppps...I realized that I used the wrong term in my post. Where I said the issue is more torque from a backhand...I meant more spin. Spin and torque aren't the same thing (as far as I know).
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Old 06-03-2021, 05:20 PM
Ahildy13 Ahildy13 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillFleming View Post
Ooppps...I realized that I used the wrong term in my post. Where I said the issue is more torque from a backhand...I meant more spin. Spin and torque aren't the same thing (as far as I know).
Torque creates the spin, spin creates stability (during the high speed portion of the flight).

The real difference is the direction of spin, and the gyroscopic effect. https://www.bartfactory.com/knowledg...ffect/?lang=en

A disc spinning clockwise (RHBH) has a torque vector pointing out of the bottom of the disc. The lift force on the wing then produces a torque to lift the nose (Which then creates the reaction torque tilting the disc right to create turn). This all adds up to a rotational momentum vector which in general points down, right, forwards.

A CCW spinning disc (RHFH) has a torque vector pointing up. The lift force on the wing then produces a torque to lift the nose (Which then creates the reaction torque tilting the disc left to create turn). This all adds up to a rotational momentum vector which in general points up, left, backwards.

I'm not going to claim this is a totally accurate breakdown, but it does make sense to me why all things equal a RHBH throw would go further than a RHFH, and why it now makes sense my lefty wife throws forehand further than backhand.

I would also be interested if any testing has ever been done to truly figure this out. Human's throwing simply have too many variables to get an accurate picture.

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Old 06-04-2021, 10:35 AM
BillFleming BillFleming is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ahildy13 View Post
I would also be interested if any testing has ever been done to truly figure this out. Human's throwing simply have too many variables to get an accurate picture.
Thanks for that explanation.

As for the testing, I wish someone would come up with a robotic disc tester like ball golf has. Then we might get accurate disc numbers across all brands instead of brands setting their own ratings, which then don't really match other brands (is. one brand's 9 speed isn't the same as another brand's 9 speed).

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Old 06-18-2021, 11:30 PM
crdiscgolf79 crdiscgolf79 is offline
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Kind of wanted to take another stab at this thread. So, all things being equal, say someone throws 250 feet forehand.....would that same amount of effort to throw something backhand be much greater in potential distance outcome in feet? In other words, is the forehand throw harder to achieve distance with compared to the backhand throw in the sense you have to have a higher degree of skill to achieve longer distances with that type of throw because of the limitations of the reach back in the forehand vs the backhand?
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Old 06-18-2021, 11:36 PM
crdiscgolf79 crdiscgolf79 is offline
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Taking a look at the world distance records in each type of throw, maybe there is something to this?

Backhand: 1030 feet
Forehand: 624 feet
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Old 06-18-2021, 11:49 PM
crdiscgolf79 crdiscgolf79 is offline
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To add, this is not to say forehand might not be easier to learn than backhand to start (as I have read beginners can do better with learning forehand over backhand to start)...but does top end forehand distance take more power/skill to achieve similar results to a very good backhand thrower?
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