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Old 04-09-2019, 12:52 PM
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SuperWookie SuperWookie is offline
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I'm sure some of you have heard this same post a thousand times. But I'm new, so....

I recently placed a few orders with some disc companies so I could get into Disc Golf. The discs look great and I'm really looking forward to getting into this sport. But right off the bat, Im experiencing some problems that probably most people also experience, and its super frustrating. TLDR is at the bottom if you dont want to read all this.

Ive played frisbee my whole life, Im a low handicap golfer, great softball player, great tennis player, basically any sport I play, Im good to really good. Im athletic, strong, tall, etc. So I have the arm speed to throw a disc really far, as well as the ability to learn difficult movements for specific sports. But so far, its going really bad, haha. And I know it will take months or years until I get really good. But it's just a disc. It looks so stupid simple to throw it far, and it doesn't do that. I can throw a frisbee just about as far, but much straighter than any of these discs! Ive been out to a HS football field near me a few times and played a round and its just sooo frustrating, haha.

I've watched TONS of videos on how to throw and watched every single video of Will Shusterick teaching how to throw. And read quite a few articles people have suggested. And I'll keep watching more videos, reading more posts, and continue to practice until I get better. But it isn't getting any better at all right now. I did a little more research about the discs I purchased, and this problem I'm having, and realize I might have purchased all the wrong sorts of discs for my first set. I know form is going to be more important than any discs, but the proper discs will help. And I got all discs that are neutral to just barely understable or barely overstable. Which, once Im much better, Im sure Ill love them! But right now, not so much, haha.

I got a Krait Champion, Axiom Insanity Prototype Prism Proton (just because it looked SO cool), Thunderbird Champion, TL Champion, Leopard3 Champion, + a Discraft Buzzz. All great discs in their own right from what Im told by a friend that has been playing a long time. I got them because they all seem like they would go really straight when thrown well. But they all go high and left when I throw them, and it feels like its really hard to get them to go far. My freaking putter goes almost as far, but straighter, haha. Because I cant throw straight or level yet, haha.

So after doing more research, it looks like I might have been better off with just 2, maybe 3 total discs other than my putter for now, and get used to how to throw better and more on plane, until I get the hang of this crazy throwing action. And in addition, it seems as if a very understable disc might be the best way to get my discs going straighter/longer until I can throw with better mechanics. Is that correct? Something like a -3/1, -4/1, -5/1 or something along those lines?

Im guessing that these super understable discs will turn over mid flight, head right, and then just barely ease their way back to the middle? Even if I throw them straight or a little left with some hyzer angle? Everyone says that beginners will get more distance and straighter throws with very understable discs, as we cant throw flat yet. Is that correct? What numbers should I be looking for? -3, -4, -5 for turn? Should I be looking at something more like an Innova Mamba or is -3/-4 good enough? And is more or less glide going to help me in the beginning to get more distance? I mean, I feel like more glide is always going to give more distance in a perfect world, but maybe with my problem of throwing so high, it wont?

I have no idea! Im throwing everything SOO high, and then it fades sooo hard left, its almost impossible to throw straight and flat. Its extremely frustrating to know how far I can hit or throw other things in sports, but these discs are just insanely difficult to use right now. I feel like their almost doing the opposite of what their supposed to be doing, haha. I think total out of a few hundred throws, 2-3 have been what I would call good or decent, not even great!

TLDR:
So my question is which of these discs below would you recommend for me? My friend who got me into the sport was recommending a Katana for me right off the bat, because he said I have a huge arm and will just destroy. He said the S glide it has will make it go forever with my arm speed. But that is NOT the case at all right now! Im barely throwing 250 most of the time and WAY left and high, haha. And should I also look at really understable control fairway drivers and approach discs as well? With -3/-4/-5 numbers to help me straighten out my throws for now, until I get better? Like an Innova Archangel, DGA Tremor, or Discraft Archer, etc?

Prodigy D4 12/6/-3/2
Prodigy D5 12/6/-4/2
Prodigy D6 12/6/-4/1
MVP Impulse 11/5/-3/1
Axiom Discs Virus 11-5/-3.5/1
Innova Mystere 11/6/-3/2
Millennium Aries 11/6/-4/2
Innova Monarch 10/5/-4/1
Millennium Aquarius 10/5/-4/2
Discraft Avenger SS 10/5/-3-1
Discmania TD2 10/5/-4/1
Legacy Nemesis 10/6/-4/2
Viking Berserker 10/5/-4/1


Thanks everyone!
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  #2  
Old 04-09-2019, 12:59 PM
jakebake91 jakebake91 is offline
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If discs are sailing way high and ending way left, it's mostly a form issue and less a disc thing. Try posting over in the form help section. Some really great dudes there to help you out with that.

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Old 04-09-2019, 01:00 PM
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You have all the discs you need. Take the Leopard and/or Thunderbird, Buzzz, and a putter and figure out how to get those to go straight and far. Once you're there, the Insanity will be the understable disc you can mix in for max distance.

Buying discs is fun and all, but if you're interested in improving your game you need to learn fundamentals and improve your form.

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Old 04-09-2019, 01:07 PM
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Reniger Reniger is offline
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Well, first off, forget the notion that abilities with frisbees directly translate to disc golf. A beach frisbee or Ultimate is a completely different tool from a golf disc. The flight numbers of a disc are only accurate if the disc is actually thrown with the form to achieve that first number - the speed. I know a lot of Ultimate players who can forehand an Ultimate disc 100 yards easily, but cannot get a golf driver up to 200' when they first start. Personally, I had a lot of confidence when I started because I grew up playing with frisbees, but learning disc golf was like trying to translate my ability as a guitar player into playing clarinet. Yes, it's music, but it's a completely different tool. It's very common for new players to want the fastest speed, thinking that means longest distance, but before learning the proper form, that is wholly incorrect. I still don't throw anything faster than a 10-speed with 380' of power.

The best recommendation for new disc golfers always remains to get a neutral midrange and learn to control speed, nose angle, and axis release angles. This is to teach you the mechanics of how a golf disc flies much different than any other flying disc (Ultimate or beach frisbee) Discs like the Innova Roc, Discraft Buzzz, and Prodigy M4 are great places to start. At high levels in the sport, these discs are easily capable of reaching 400' and even as a moderate player myself, my mids can reach 300'

Learning mechanics, timing, release angles, and form will benefit you the most. Almost universally, the advice for new players is to leave drivers alone for a period when you begin. Having to compensate for inappropriate form to force a disc to do what you want only teaches you bad lessons that only hinder progress in the long run. Typically it's advised to stick to 7-speed and below for a couple months while learning the new tools. After over 15 years of playing, I still take breaks and throw putter-only rounds to keep my form in check after hiatus.

Welcome to the sport, it's a blast!


Last edited by Reniger; 04-09-2019 at 01:11 PM.
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Old 04-09-2019, 01:39 PM
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wolfmandragon wolfmandragon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperWookie View Post
I'm sure some of you have heard this same post a thousand times. But I'm new, so....

I recently placed a few orders with some disc companies so I could get into Disc Golf. The discs look great and I'm really looking forward to getting into this sport. But right off the bat, I’m experiencing some problems that probably most people also experience, and it’s super frustrating. TLDR is at the bottom if you don’t want to read all this.

I’ve played frisbee my whole life, I’m a low handicap golfer, great softball player, great tennis player, basically any sport I play, I’m good to really good. I’m athletic, strong, tall, etc. So I have the arm speed to throw a disc really far, as well as the ability to learn difficult movements for specific sports. But so far, it’s going really bad, haha. And I know it will take months or years until I get really good. But it's just a disc. It looks so stupid simple to throw it far, and it doesn't do that. I can throw a frisbee just about as far, but much straighter than any of these discs! I’ve been out to a HS football field near me a few times and played a round and it’s just sooo frustrating, haha.

I've watched TONS of videos on how to throw and watched every single video of Will Shusterick teaching how to throw. And read quite a few articles people have suggested. And I'll keep watching more videos, reading more posts, and continue to practice until I get better. But it isn't getting any better at all right now. I did a little more research about the discs I purchased, and this problem I'm having, and realize I might have purchased all the wrong sorts of discs for my first set. I know form is going to be more important than any discs, but the proper discs will help. And I got all discs that are neutral to just barely understable or barely overstable. Which, once I’m much better, I’m sure I’ll love them! But right now, not so much, haha.

I got a Krait Champion, Axiom Insanity Prototype Prism Proton (just because it looked SO cool), Thunderbird Champion, TL Champion, Leopard3 Champion, + a Discraft Buzzz. All great discs in their own right from what I’m told by a friend that has been playing a long time. I got them because they all seem like they would go really straight when thrown well. But they all go high and left when I throw them, and it feels like it’s really hard to get them to go far. My freaking putter goes almost as far, but straighter, haha. Because I can’t throw straight or level yet, haha.

So after doing more research, it looks like I might have been better off with just 2, maybe 3 total discs other than my putter for now, and get used to how to throw better and more on plane, until I get the hang of this crazy throwing action. And in addition, it seems as if a very understable disc might be the best way to get my discs going straighter/longer until I can throw with better mechanics. Is that correct? Something like a -3/1, -4/1, -5/1 or something along those lines?

I’m guessing that these super understable discs will turn over mid flight, head right, and then just barely ease their way back to the middle? Even if I throw them straight or a little left with some hyzer angle? Everyone says that beginners will get more distance and straighter throws with very understable discs, as we can’t throw flat yet. Is that correct? What numbers should I be looking for? -3, -4, -5 for turn? Should I be looking at something more like an Innova Mamba or is -3/-4 good enough? And is more or less glide going to help me in the beginning to get more distance? I mean, I feel like more glide is always going to give more distance in a perfect world, but maybe with my problem of throwing so high, it won’t?

I have no idea! I’m throwing everything SOO high, and then it fades sooo hard left, it’s almost impossible to throw straight and flat. It’s extremely frustrating to know how far I can hit or throw other things in sports, but these discs are just insanely difficult to use right now. I feel like their almost doing the opposite of what their supposed to be doing, haha. I think total out of a few hundred throws, 2-3 have been what I would call good or decent, not even great!

TLDR:
So my question is which of these discs below would you recommend for me? My friend who got me into the sport was recommending a Katana for me right off the bat, because he said I have a huge arm and will just destroy. He said the S glide it has will make it go forever with my arm speed. But that is NOT the case at all right now! I’m barely throwing 250 most of the time and WAY left and high, haha. And should I also look at really understable control fairway drivers and approach discs as well? With -3/-4/-5 numbers to help me straighten out my throws for now, until I get better? Like an Innova Archangel, DGA Tremor, or Discraft Archer, etc?

Prodigy D4 – 12/6/-3/2
Prodigy D5 – 12/6/-4/2
Prodigy D6 – 12/6/-4/1
MVP Impulse – 11/5/-3/1
Axiom Discs Virus – 11-5/-3.5/1
Innova Mystere – 11/6/-3/2
Millennium Aries – 11/6/-4/2
Innova Monarch – 10/5/-4/1
Millennium Aquarius – 10/5/-4/2
Discraft Avenger SS – 10/5/-3-1
Discmania TD2 – 10/5/-4/1
Legacy Nemesis – 10/6/-4/2
Viking Berserker – 10/5/-4/1


Thanks everyone!

None of these. You probably will do better with touch discs from your frisbee background.

Discraft Comet
Innova Condor
Lat64 River
MVP Ion
MVP Plasma Volt
Axiom Envy


Speed 8(Volt) will go longer than your form can throw. Work with these, then step up to the fast discs.

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Old 04-09-2019, 01:42 PM
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Bogey B.O.B. Bogey B.O.B. is offline
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Heres a few quick thoughts.

There are no magical discs. Pick a few different single digit speed discs with high turn and low fade. Stick with them until they fly similar to the numbers. The relatively subtle differences between discs are not useful until you have good form, power and understanding.

Throw low. Think line drive. Yes, pros throw big bombs that can get quite high but you are not them.

Dont be afraid to throw your putter. It will help you understand how discs fly and how the release angle affects the flight.

As long as youre not throwing discs that are too fast and or over stable, its not the disc, its you.

Try to refrain from spending money on discs. Instead, spend time learning to throw.

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Old 04-09-2019, 02:20 PM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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What you're seeing is called the "noob hyzer". It's when you throw nose up so the disc just climbs straight up high, stalls out, and crashes left. This is a nose angle and form issue, every disc will do this if you throw it incorrectly.

You need to grip the disc so it is nose down of the forearm. This article should help: https://www.dgcoursereview.com/dgr/r...ttoripit.shtml

Stick to neutral and slower discs for learning, they are more forgiving of nose angle issues and will also glide better at low to moderate speed. Neutral putters, your Buzzz, Leo, and TL are perfect. Putters/mids will go straighter and glide better at lower power, and the TL/Leo will teach you more about nose angles and will eventually have that S-flight.

Don't expect to see the listed flight number style flights out of discs until you are throwing mids at least 250' and fairways at least 300'. Honestly I think the flight numbers are more true at 300' for mids and 330' for fairways, but many players who have played for years don't even throw those distances.

Also post video in the form analysis section if you want more direct advice. Try to balance like you would for a tennis BH or lefty baseball swing. It's about balance and leverage, not crushing with your arm.

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Old 04-09-2019, 02:25 PM
Moose33 Moose33 is offline
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Grab that Leo3 and the Buzzz, go to a soccer or football field and work on throwing them level, with a clean release. When you can do that figure out how far they are going and come back. I’ll happily make you a dozen recommendations then.

Right now you just need to sail in the form. Dave Feldberg has some good backhand videos, and though he’s a lesser known masters player, I really began to understand the forehand technique better than just raw power watching Mark Ellis.

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Old 04-09-2019, 02:31 PM
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Some people will tell you to avoid drivers altogether - I'd say at least stick with your leopard. Slow drivers (as opposed to midranges and faster drivers) teach the importance of nose-down, but are more forgiving of errors than the faster stuff. Also, even as you start to outdrive your putter with other discs, don't stop driving off the tee with it, as this is a valuable shot and skill to have, and helps improve form. Keep in mind that for better or worse, putters do not mind being thrown nose-up... which will kill your distance and shot shaping with anything faster.

I'd leave any faster drivers behind when you're playing rounds.

One thing I might recommend if you cant resist shopping for shiny new plastic is an extremely understable disc. I like the Tremor you mentioned, or the old standby, a DX Stingray, both around 170g. Anything faster than those and you'll have a hard time getting a consistent understable flight. I think an understable disc is a necessity for anyone learning backhand as it's a surefire way to reduce frustration with those high fade shots you keep getting with you more stable stuff.

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Old 04-09-2019, 02:33 PM
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This is all great info, and some of it I already know. Form is obviously going to always be very important. And I will for sure go over to the form threads and keep reading and learning.

Plus, I should have mentioned this, but I don't throw EVERY single disc high and way left. That's just the avg throw as of right now. I have thrown a few good throws, and a handful of decent ones as well. A few that were about 10-15' off the ground and more or less straight right from my hand. But the common problem among all of those throws and all the bad ones is that the disc almost always turns left sooner than later (even on the few good throws I had) and just fizzles out. The best throw I had was actually with my Krait driver. It went about 10-15' off the ground dead straight for most of the way, then tailed off to the left about 10'. It was about 250 or maybe even longer! It was so cool. But even that one was with a Disc that is supposed to go RIGHT most of the way and gently come back to the middle and it didn't. If I throw any of my discs straight, it goes straight for a little bit, then starts cruising left most of the rest of the way and just looses tons of distance by curving left. It's really frustrating. And obviously some of that is form and some of that is the Disc.

So I'm just asking if a really understable disc will help with that or not? Because all of these disc companies say that a super understable disc is perfect for beginners to get more distance and straighter throws. So are they lying? I am obviously going to practice and practice and then practice more so that I can become a good player with good form. But the discs HAVE to make some sort of difference... right?

Just like in Golf. You can be a relative newbie, you can have a horrible swing, and not make very good contact, and not have proper lag in your swing. But if you give a newbie to the game a hard to hit unforgiving driver with an XX Stiff flex shaft that weighs 110g, and then a VERY forgiving driver with a R flex shaft that weighs 65g, guess which one their going to hit MUCH better WAY more often.....? The R flex shaft with the more forgiving head. Not every time, but overall, they will hit better shots more often and have more fun and learn the game sooner than if you gave them some club or shaft that is totally unsuited for them.

So it HAS to be the same in Disc Golf. Otherwise they wouldn't make all these different discs, right? There has to be some discs in the 6-11 speed range that I can have MORE success with than what I have currently, correct? Maybe not magical, or every throw going dead straight and far. But more throws will go farther and straighter than what I have. That seems like a VERY safe assumption.

Same goes for any sport where equipment is involved. I don't like how some people OVER simplify the sports and just blanket statement tell every newcomer to stop worrying about equipment and just practice. That is not the best answer for newcomers to any sport. Equipment plays a large part of most sports, as I'm sure it does in Disc Golf. Sure, the form is THE most important part of the equation. I already know that. But If a newcomer to golf, softball, hockey, rockclimbing, or any other sport I've played and been good at asked me equipment advice, I wouldn't just tell them to stop worrying about it and go practice forever with whatever equipment because it doesn't matter until they get good. That's ridiculous.

I'd tell them to find the easiest to use piece of equipment for their issues and go from there. That way, at least they have a piece of equipment that IS easier to use and help them learn the sport. And that is all I'm asking here in this thread. I will definitely be getting over into the form threads and reading and learning all the time. And I obviously will be practicing all the time to get better. I'm just asking some simple equipment questions here and wondering if anyone has any good suggestions for some EASIER to throw discs that will go farther and straighter overall than what I have. Thanks so much everyone!
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