#51  
Old 08-09-2015, 10:17 AM
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DavidSauls DavidSauls is offline
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Originally Posted by blazerico View Post
another thing to consider is most of the high level p2p have the owners living on site, so the initial investment is for their home and land, which they have to buy anyway in order to have a place to live and raise a family; therefore, your initial calculation may be way off.
True but, in respect to the O.P., he was asking a different question. How much would it take to get a 10% return on investment for someone buying land to build a course, without consideration of other uses or income? The answer is that it's probably impossible. So, nobody's going to invest in land for a disc golf course, with the expectation that disc golf will give a return on that investment.

In addition to the private courses on already-owned land, there are people on this site who bought land with the intent of building a course---but also building a home. The hope is that the disc golf pays for the course or perhaps, if things work out, contributes a little bit to the land cost. And, of course, those owners get, not only a place to live, but the opportunity to live with lots of room around them, and to live on a disc golf course.
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  #52  
Old 08-09-2015, 02:05 PM
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InnocentCrook InnocentCrook is offline
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^^^ Yeah, I gotta get going on the house as we just outgrew our barndominium 3 hours ago with the arrival of daughter #2.(Mom and baby are doing great.)

Like David said, we were already planning on buying land for a house, but we did end up buying a little more than originally planned because we found a beautiful spot for a great price. We had some help with some close family buying a chunk of it with us to create a little family village so to speak. Plus my bro in law is splitting much of the course costs (equipment, baskets, labor, etc.) which helps immensely.

We'd be building trails and stuff anyway, so anything that we happen to make off the course is just gonna be gravy.
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  #53  
Old 08-09-2015, 03:14 PM
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^^^ Yeah, I gotta get going on the house as we just outgrew our barndominium 3 hours ago with the arrival of daughter #2.(Mom and baby are doing great.)
......and coursework grounds to a halt....
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  #54  
Old 08-09-2015, 03:17 PM
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Originally Posted by reposado View Post
Or you might have a profitable beer garden that has a disc golf course out back
That's the spirit! And after the third drink, the course is free to play until sunset!
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Old 08-10-2015, 11:53 AM
reposado reposado is offline
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Originally Posted by DavidSauls View Post
True but, in respect to the O.P., he was asking a different question. How much would it take to get a 10% return on investment for someone buying land to build a course, without consideration of other uses or income? The answer is that it's probably impossible. So, nobody's going to invest in land for a disc golf course, with the expectation that disc golf will give a return on that investment.

In addition to the private courses on already-owned land, there are people on this site who bought land with the intent of building a course---but also building a home. The hope is that the disc golf pays for the course or perhaps, if things work out, contributes a little bit to the land cost. And, of course, those owners get, not only a place to live, but the opportunity to live with lots of room around them, and to live on a disc golf course.
i glossed over that 10% bit. yeah that is not likely to happen regardless. if anyoen has a business that will generate 10% profits, please let me know before everyone else finds out....
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Old 08-10-2015, 12:01 PM
keith johnson keith johnson is offline
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Your mom and pop gas stations.........raking in 20-30% for last 3-5 years and counting.
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Old 08-10-2015, 01:52 PM
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It will take some time to break even and even longer to get profitable.

Even though I'm still building my 24-27 hole course, I have 18 holes playable with at least 2-3 tees each. Not all of those 18 holes are a finished product but most are pretty close and just need a couple trees taken down to open it up a little more for the beginners.

Since it's not "finished", I haven't had a whole lot of people play this summer. To be honest, I've had more families (mom, dad and their teenage kids playing disc for the very first time) out here than disc golfers. Thank God I designed red tees into the course because they'd be screwed if playing the whites or blues

The families have also been some of the most generous in donations. Very common for them to donate $10-$20 EACH PERSON. As far as disc golfers go, $5 and a challenging course seem to be too much for them. Don't take that the wrong way. There have been many good people and discers come through here during the building process and a bunch of them have helped or donated $10-20 each too, but they are few and far between. The ones that get my head scratching are the dudes with the $100+ disc golf bags filled with 20+ discs at $15-30 bucks per disc that scoff at paying to play, or in my course's case, don't even donate a dime (unless they consider their empty beer cans a donated dime with 10 cent return) or a "thank you for having us out to your private course" type of players. Are we really that cheap? I can see how it would add up if you played everyday but that's still pretty cheap for 2-3 hrs of entertainment.

We were blessed and found a home with a barn and 30 acres. Turned the barn into a clubhouse/proshop/equip building/storage I already had over 20 baskets from my old course that I bought one at a time from selling off my old disc golf discs. I didn't make a killing selling them off but was able to buy a basket here and there every year since 2006. Will I ever make a profit? Hopefully, but I knew well before I put up my life's savings on the down payment that this wasn't going to make me rich with money. It's a hobby that I hope to sustain it's self. I'd rather not turn it into a business. I've gone that route years ago in another profession and it totally sucked the life and passion out of it for me. So let's just say that I have a private disc golf course at my house instead of saying I have $XXX,XXX.XX amount of dollars invested in disc golf. I'd also advise against buying land for "disc golf only" if you were not going to live there too. The money is just not there yet to justify building a stand-alone disc golf course.
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Old 01-18-2022, 03:34 PM
hanger129 hanger129 is offline
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Digging this thread back up. I'm curious to know people's opinions on this topic now that disc golf has seen a large boom during the pandemic. In today's DG landscape, how likely is it that a truly great course could break even, or be profitable, from entry fees alone?

A friend has the opportunity to build a disc golf course on private land that is owned by an interested party, so land cost is not an issue. He hopes to work with an experienced course designer in the hopes of having a truly great course right from the get-go. The property is within an hour of a major city that has a well-established disc golf scene.
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Old 01-18-2022, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by hanger129 View Post
Digging this thread back up. I'm curious to know people's opinions on this topic now that disc golf has seen a large boom during the pandemic. In today's DG landscape, how likely is it that a truly great course could break even, or be profitable, from entry fees alone?

A friend has the opportunity to build a disc golf course on private land that is owned by an interested party, so land cost is not an issue. He hopes to work with an experienced course designer in the hopes of having a truly great course right from the get-go. The property is within an hour of a major city that has a well-established disc golf scene.
This experienced course designer has yet to see an example where a single course installation on any scale could be profitable by itself. In some combination of pro shop, bar, campgrounds, daily leagues, other skill games, alternate seasonal use (like ski hill), dispensary (where legal), it might be possible. The best profitable single course has been Morley Field in San Diego, but that model would be hard to duplicate anywhere else considering the 365 days good weather, nearby population and lack of competition there over the years. A short tiki type course where the broader public market could immediately be successful throwing Frisbees/Super Class discs might have the best chance like the Tiki course at the Blockhouse (VA) or Flying Armadillo (TX).

Any of the course owners who post here would probably agree that owning and running your course is still a matter of loving the game and the players. You might be able to break even on a cash basis but likely not come close to paying yourself a decent income for the work you and volunteers have put in to build it and later maintain it.

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  #60  
Old 01-18-2022, 04:44 PM
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By "profitable", do we mean covering expenses, or generating enough income to live on?

If the land is already owned, and the owner (or someone) doing the maintenance work, the right course could make a profit. That is, cover expenses and put a little cash in his pocket.

The covid boom helps, but all of the other hurdles mentioned 5 years ago, still apply.

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