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Old 04-12-2019, 12:35 PM
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Doofenshmirtz Doofenshmirtz is offline
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Default Tee box dimension and other design questions.

In trying to cut a few cost corners - hopefully intelligently - I was trying to figure out how to vary tee box size so as not to "waste" money on tee boxes that were larger than necessary for short holes.

One local course has 5'x12' tee boxes for all holes between 180 and 1000 feet. That is what I have generally viewed as a standard size. For the course I'm putting in over the next several months (fingers crossed that it doesn't take a year) I'd like to use 5-6'x12' for holes requiring full power throws off the tee (only about 4-5 holes) and maybe bring that down to 4'x10' for holes under about 250' or so.

I don't want to shorten the tee box too much for less powerful players who may want a run-up even on shorter holes, and I certainly know my preferences, but would like some input as to where to draw the line. The parameters to work with are 4'-6' in width and 8'-12' in length. My initial idea is to consider any hole under 225' to be a "standstill" hole with the smallest tee box and only consider a hole to be full power if the throw from the tee is over 300'. Does this need to be adjusted?

Additionally, I may have a source for free railroad cross ties to frame the tee boxes with. I've never put in paver tee boxes before, but if I can get the ties, I plan to partially sink them and use them to frame the paver tee boxes with the ties slightly higher than the level of the pavers. Does anyone anticipate any problems with this?
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Old 04-12-2019, 12:43 PM
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Horsman Horsman is offline
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Pavers are slick imo and should be avoided. I prefer large tee-pads since my 6'6" frame has difficulties with short tee-pads, but most of those difficulties are solved if the tee pads are flush with the ground and there is room behind the tee that is the same level as the tee. Also I think labeling a short hole as a "standstill" hole might be true for you and others but lower power players will still be throwing full power shots and require a full length tee pad for their shot. IMO you should keep the tees consistent in size and materials.

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Old 04-12-2019, 02:29 PM
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Golden Tuna Golden Tuna is offline
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Personal Opinion: I like course continuity. So, if you're going to invest in tee pads, I would suggest "doing it right the first time" as I prefer to see 18 "identical" pads.

I am going through the same thing at the course I manage... We are about to install tee pads and corner cutting is tempting, but in the long run, you're not doing yourself any favors...

Every local course I've played (regularly) has evolved from the first time I played it to today. Some evolved quickly (within a year) other took a decade to get pads or good tee signs, benches, etc.

My perspective: course design is not a sprint, it is a marathon. There can be sprints within the marathon, but it takes a long time OR a lot of money to "finish" a course. So, take your time, do it right, and allow yourself the time it requires to get it right...

**Side Note: I know course design, installation, etc. are a lot of work. Thanks for the effort you're putting into the land to make it a course. Maybe someday, I'll pass through your town and get the opportunity to enjoy it.

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Old 04-12-2019, 02:57 PM
JC17393 JC17393 is offline
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My course's tee pads vary in size based on hole length. Under 300 feet are 4x8, 300-400 feet are 4x10, over 400 feet are 5x12. Also have two holes sub 200 that are 4x6 (downhill that really shouldn't require a run up at all). I'm a firm believer in teepads being just another element of design. Just like well placed trees can force a certain line or shot type, and basket placement on a green can favor an approach from one side versus the other (or one spin versus another), I think tee size should vary to fit the size and style of the hole.

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Old 04-12-2019, 03:44 PM
biscoe biscoe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsman View Post
Pavers are slick imo and should be avoided. I prefer large tee-pads since my 6'6" frame has difficulties with short tee-pads, but most of those difficulties are solved if the tee pads are flush with the ground and there is room behind the tee that is the same level as the tee. Also I think labeling a short hole as a "standstill" hole might be true for you and others but lower power players will still be throwing full power shots and require a full length tee pad for their shot. IMO you should keep the tees consistent in size and materials.
I don't like pavers either. Too slick and too much potential to become uneven over time.

I also agree on tee length although not just because of "low power" players. James Conrad, for instance, takes his full runup pretty much every tee shot regardless of length of hole.
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Old 04-12-2019, 04:09 PM
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chevis chevis is offline
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definitely try to get the pad flush with the ground; some players have a diagonal runup; some will trip off the front, a lot will trip watching their drive.

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Old 04-12-2019, 04:46 PM
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ru4por ru4por is offline
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Another vote for full size pads, regardless of hole length. Others have brought to light my reasons. I also would consider that the life of RR ties is likely less than the life of concrete.
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Old 04-12-2019, 06:15 PM
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Doofenshmirtz Doofenshmirtz is offline
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Another vote for full size pads, regardless of hole length. Others have brought to light my reasons. I also would consider that the life of RR ties is likely less than the life of concrete.
While I agree, generally speaking, that concrete will outlast wooden cross ties, concrete is not an available option.

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Old 04-12-2019, 06:27 PM
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Doofenshmirtz Doofenshmirtz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horsman View Post
Pavers are slick imo and should be avoided. I prefer large tee-pads since my 6'6" frame has difficulties with short tee-pads, but most of those difficulties are solved if the tee pads are flush with the ground and there is room behind the tee that is the same level as the tee. Also I think labeling a short hole as a "standstill" hole might be true for you and others but lower power players will still be throwing full power shots and require a full length tee pad for their shot. IMO you should keep the tees consistent in size and materials.
Pavers are not my first choice, but will likely be used anyway. Here are some parameters:

Must be able to be carried over rough terrain by hand or wheelbarrow.
Must be durable.
Must be able to install by hand without lifting equipment.
Must not be much more expensive than pavers.

Whatcha got? Turf maybe? Seriously, no purchases have been made yet. I can probably get free cross ties for framing and free sand (and possibly gravel) for a foundation and only have to pay $1.25/square foot for the pavers plus about $20 for polymeric sand per tee box. I cannot pour concrete unless the city changes its mind (not likely but not utterly impossible either).

Incidentally, I have played on pavers that are not slick and have played on poured concrete that was extremely slick. The former was what informed the current decision to use pavers. I'm probably going to use pavers, but am still open to other ideas.
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Old 04-13-2019, 07:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doofenshmirtz View Post
Pavers are not my first choice, but will likely be used anyway. Here are some parameters:

Must be able to be carried over rough terrain by hand or wheelbarrow.
Must be durable.
Must be able to install by hand without lifting equipment.
Must not be much more expensive than pavers.

Whatcha got? Turf maybe? Seriously, no purchases have been made yet. I can probably get free cross ties for framing and free sand (and possibly gravel) for a foundation and only have to pay $1.25/square foot for the pavers plus about $20 for polymeric sand per tee box. I cannot pour concrete unless the city changes its mind (not likely but not utterly impossible either).

Incidentally, I have played on pavers that are not slick and have played on poured concrete that was extremely slick. The former was what informed the current decision to use pavers. I'm probably going to use pavers, but am still open to other ideas.
Since concrete is a no go I think I would lean towards natural tees (personal preference) since they are less slick then turf and pavers for me usually. If its between turf and pavers I chose turf. Because if 1 paver gets out of wack then it will have an exposed edge that can and will catch peoples shoes when they play (ive had it happen). Id rather take lumpy turf over hard edges of pavers.
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