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Old 04-15-2021, 06:20 PM
itsRudy itsRudy is offline
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Default What are the Pros/Cons of Learning opposite hand Backhand vs dominant Forehand?

My forehand is miserable but I've been improving lately thanks to Scott Stokely videos. However, it's nothing coming natural to me and in my early days I learned and practiced backhands for both hands and while I dropped it to concentrate on my dominant hand (RHBH), it's something I feel ready to pick up again.

Iow, I'm basically at the same starting point for both, with a slight advantage in distance for LHBH. I also have no problems throwing low shots with RHBH, in fact I often skim the grass too low with my shots.

The reason I ask is forehand seems really prone to injuries.
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Old 04-15-2021, 06:27 PM
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Horsman Horsman is offline
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I would argue that the forehand would be more useful. For me its useful to have a forehand when you are in a position without a run up and need to generate a lot of power. I feel like the forehand is a better compliment to a sturdy backhand over opposite hand backhand

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Old 04-15-2021, 06:31 PM
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sidewinder22 sidewinder22 is offline
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I think FH is especially prone to injury if it doesn't come naturally from other sports or skipping stones.

I think the only cons to BH is when in tight spaces, you need more range of motion. And on FH it's much easier to keep your eyes on the target.

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Old 04-15-2021, 08:34 PM
nothinbuttree nothinbuttree is offline
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If your dominant hand ever gets injured, you will be able to keep playing at a reasonable level having developed your off hand. Without a lengthy learning curve.

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Old 04-15-2021, 10:33 PM
txmxer txmxer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nothinbuttree View Post
If your dominant hand ever gets injured, you will be able to keep playing at a reasonable level having developed your off hand. Without a lengthy learning curve.
almost posted a story on this. My buddies that got me started in DG did this. One of the guys injured his bicep. They decided to commiserate and everyone threw offhand. Before my time, but they still throw LHBH on certain pins/throws. Great tool when needed.

I'm working on a serviceable RHFH, but planning to do some work on a LHBH some time this year.

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Old 04-16-2021, 08:37 AM
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Gyroscopic Gyroscopic is offline
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Your off hand will of course be way clumsier naturally. Some people have an easier time learning than others. I learned due to injuries.

Like Sidewinder22 says, you can hurt yourself easier with poor forehand technique than you can with poor backhand technique.

It may be a good idea to use the forehand for upshots until you get really good at them. Adding a little power should be safe if you develop a smooth motion.

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Last edited by Gyroscopic; 04-16-2021 at 08:38 AM. Reason: Forgot something
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Old 04-16-2021, 08:43 AM
oldmandiscer oldmandiscer is offline
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The BH is naturally more powerful because of the added spin. Straighter lines, more control.

I feel like a total noob trying to throw lefty BH and I don't think I could ever become good at it. So I just rely on FH. I'm like 90/10 backhand.

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Old 04-16-2021, 09:00 AM
autocrosscrx autocrosscrx is offline
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Some of the forehand lines that are relatively basic (flexes, late fade, etc) are far more advanced backhand techniques.

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Old 04-16-2021, 09:47 AM
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I'd argue that most people that have elbow problems are a combination of poor form, no warmup, and forearm tightness.

As a 50/50 BH-FH player I would say one the best things for my game, and keeping my elbow/shoulder healthy, is a good warmup combined with post-round stretching. I'll include the 5 minute warm-up video, I perform every day, below. It really gets your elbow/shoulder ready to throw. If you're properly warmed up, and stretch after throwing, you'll be significantly better off and be able to keep that elbow and shoulder healthy.



And here is the stretching I do every night. My elbow used to have a little pain/discomfort before doing these warmups and stretches. They are essential to my longevity.



Last edited by Lemur; 04-16-2021 at 09:50 AM.
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Old 04-19-2021, 07:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsRudy View Post
My forehand is miserable but I've been improving lately thanks to Scott Stokely videos. However, it's nothing coming natural to me and in my early days I learned and practiced backhands for both hands and while I dropped it to concentrate on my dominant hand (RHBH), it's something I feel ready to pick up again.

Iow, I'm basically at the same starting point for both, with a slight advantage in distance for LHBH. I also have no problems throwing low shots with RHBH, in fact I often skim the grass too low with my shots.

The reason I ask is forehand seems really prone to injuries.
Although teaching people to become ambidextrous has been popular for centuries, this practice does not appear to improve brain function, and it may even harm our neural development.

Calls for ambidexterity were especially prominent in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. For instance, in the early 20th century English propagandist John Jackson established the Ambidextral Culture Society in pursuit of universal ambidexterity and “two-brainedness” for the betterment of society.

This hype died down in the mid-20th century as benefits of being ambidextrous failed to materialize. Given that handedness is apparent early in life and the vast majority of people are right-handed, we are almost certainly dextral by nature. Recent evidence even associated being ambidextrous from birth with developmental problems, including reading disability and stuttering. A study of 11-year-olds in England showed that those who are naturally ambidextrous are slightly more prone to academic difficulties than either left- or right-handers. Research in Sweden found ambidextrous children to be at a greater risk for developmental conditions such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Another study, which my colleagues and I conducted, revealed that ambidextrous children and adults both performed worse than left- or right-handers on a range of skills, especially in math, memory retrieval and logical reasoning.

These effects are slight, but the risks of training to become ambidextrous may cause similar difficulties. The two hemispheres of the brain are not interchangeable. The left hemisphere, for example, is typically responsible for language processing, whereas the right hemisphere often handles nonverbal activities. These asymmetries probably evolved to allow the two sides of the brain to specialize. To attempt to undo or tamper with this efficient setup may invite psychological problems.

It is possible to train your nondominant hand to become more proficient. A concert pianist demonstrates superb skill with both hands, but this mastery is complementary rather than competitive. The visual arts may enhance right-brain function, though not at the expense of verbal specialization in the left hemisphere. A cooperative brain seems to work better than one in which the two sides compete.
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