#21  
Old 11-30-2019, 02:20 PM
DiscFifty DiscFifty is offline
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Originally Posted by disco40 View Post
It would be nice to put down thoughts while getting through these noob stages of development, to maybe inspire or amuse others and to have something to reflect on.
I took notes for a quite a while when I first found myself taking the sport serious. I was writing down distances for every disc, how they flew, etc, etc. Years later, I do the same thing a few times a year just to get an exact understanding how far all of my discs are flying. I think it's a great tool, especially if you track your distance potential with each disc.
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  #22  
Old 12-03-2019, 12:13 PM
disco40 disco40 is online now
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Originally Posted by Odedge View Post
Good to hear the progress is continuing. I can relate to the fact that when you throw far, it usually doesn't take that much effort, but form and timing. I can easily throw a 200' bad throw that is physically harder than a 330' parked near a basket.

After about a year, I have finally settled on a general putting style and found a putter [DD Warden] that seems to work well for me. I was in the zone for about a week or two were I was making 40-50' that didn't seem that hard. This week has been slightly different.

I relate to your area of regression as I don't watch my bad shots either. I think the reason is that it's hard for me to know why some of them are bad. I have a bad issue of early releasing and without video evidence or someone knowledgable watching me, it's a guessing game.

Regarding your "shank", it's probably what you mentioned and maybe having your reach back a little too high and you bring it down a bit too much? I actually had a shot like that this week and it wasn't a pretty drive.

A true hyzer shot [right hand back hand] should have the disc going from a lower reach back to a higher release while bent at the waist. It usually involves a back left to a front right line if you are doing an x-step. It usually involves an overstable disc for your "arm speed".

A hyzer flip should probably be thrown like a flat shot, but slightly bent at the waist. You are still reach "straight" back and following flatter than a true hyzer shot. You are usually going in a "straight" line down the tee pad. You should use a disc that can flip/turn right for you.

The purpose of a hyzer flip isn't really to make the disc flight to the right. Its purpose is to make a disc that would normally turn to the right go straight. This happens when you release on that "slight" hyzer angle and the disc turns from that angle into a "flat" angle while it's turning or flipping over.

If done properly you can make a disc with no fade go very straight [Innova Mako3 or DD Warrant for me] or a disc with little fade [Innova Leopard3 or Lattitude 64 River] go very straight and then fade a little at the end.

You might want to watch this Physics of Flight video [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XGzv7dUYeuA] about the nine basic shot shapes you can make. It helped me to understand what you can do and the terminology as well.
Ah, thank you for your description of the hyzer flip, that makes sense. And thanks for the video series, it has given me a few things to work on and made some more sense out of the terms.

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Originally Posted by Mocheez View Post
I am 40 as well. Stretching has become necessary before I play, especially hips, shoulders and hamstrings. Disc golf only puts torque on the spine if you have poor form. I use to have occasional lower back issues but have felt great over the last couple of years as my form has improved and my hips have loosened up.
Glad to hear your back issues and stuff are getting better long-term with improved form at our age, I'm hoping for the same. I started with what I thought was a strong, healthy back, but it turns out that it really wasn't up to the task of playing disc golf 3-4x a week.

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Originally Posted by DiscFifty View Post
I took notes for a quite a while when I first found myself taking the sport serious. I was writing down distances for every disc, how they flew, etc, etc. Years later, I do the same thing a few times a year just to get an exact understanding how far all of my discs are flying. I think it's a great tool, especially if you track your distance potential with each disc.
I didn't intentionally make my username so close to yours lol. I'd like to find a reliable practice field for this, it seems like a good idea that will help me know my discs better and cut down on the guessing.
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  #23  
Old 12-05-2019, 06:39 PM
disco40 disco40 is online now
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Dropping in for another "stoked" post about my round today. Playing Endicott Park in north St. Louis lately, because it has way more shot-shaping challenges than Carrollton Park and I can reach many of the holes.

Parked back to back holes playing about 270' each, with different discs and shot shapes. First was a low flex shot with my Leopard that had to hyzer back at a rather specific distance beyond a far tree, and the second was something between an S shot and a hyzer flip down a tight low line with my TL. Both shots flew just the way I wanted them to, and both were tap-ins.

The rest of the round was meh, and I lost a bright pink disc (Star Teebird) in the leaves in the middle of the fairway (searched more than 30 minutes lol).

I'm also getting used to a straddle putt that I'm still terrible at, but that is much more consistent for me right now. I may change my putting style several times, but this is great to learn on because it forces me to drive the motion with my legs. I can already tell that it's going to be difficult to add spin to this putt.

It's nice to have progressed from struggling to execute a reasonably serviceable, straight shot to having a specific flight path in mind. I only hit my line maybe 1/3 of the time at this point, with another 1/3 being acceptable misses and 1/3 being howlers, but I'm also working in some shots that seem quite technical for my current skill level, so the progress is exciting.

Like, there's a distinction for me now between a shot that turns over late and one that turns over early, and I'm more able to control how much hyzer I'm going for. I'm also spending some time debating some finer points about which disc best suits each throw.

Of course, sometimes I go through a deep internal shot-selection process and then just go ahead and toss it directly into a creek. Still stoked!

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  #24  
Old 12-08-2019, 01:40 AM
disco40 disco40 is online now
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Want to record my history of disc purchases and reasoning (maybe this will be helpful to others?):


1. Let's play disc golf!

Innova DX starter pack (cheap investment to try the game)
DX Beast (had to know what a driver was like...lol)

2. Wanted to try some nicer plastic, an understable midrange, plus find a fairway driver

Ti BuzzSS (great disc that I throw well, but feels a little gummy)
Star Teebird3 (still too fast for my noob arm)
Luna (Paul McBeth fanboyism and fortunately I happen to love the feel)

3. Needed to disc down a little on my fairway (tee, for me) driver and try a new plastic

ESP BuzzSS (wanted to try ESP plastic, love the feel)
Star TL (a tick slower than Teebird3, perfect speed for me, but a little "domey" and can lift too much)
Champion Leopard (even slower "driver" whose great noob reputation is well earned)
Luna (more putters is better, means I throw more putts on the course)

4. Now that I can throw straighter, I need more stability in my bag

Ti Buzz (love the BuzzSS so I'm trying its stable brother)
Star RocX3 (this rounds out my midranges with an overstable one)
Luna (two putters are nice, but three would be better, plus my oldest Luna is now more of a beat up approach disc)


Current bag:

Putter/Approach: Luna (x3)
Midrange: BuzzSS (x2), Buzz, RocX3
Driver: TL, Leopard



I really love Innova's Star and Champion (it's not even that slick) plastics, and Discraft's ESP. I find Discraft's Titanium to be a little uncomfortable and gummy, yet I throw it well regardless, so I'll stick with it.


My discs range from 168g-172g, and a little heavier for putters. I would like to buy something lighter and something heavier next purchase, just to see how they feel, but 168-172 feels like it's in my wheelhouse.


Question: If I'm going to learn to throw a forehand next month, are any of my discs above good choices in your opinion, or should I look for something different?
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  #25  
Old 12-09-2019, 04:52 PM
DiscFifty DiscFifty is offline
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Originally Posted by disco40 View Post
Question: If I'm going to learn to throw a forehand next month, are any of my discs above good choices in your opinion, or should I look for something different?
Before the flood of "use overstable" discs for fh, since you are "learning" how to throw fh, consider learning with an understable disc and learning how to hyzer flip it via fh. Your future fh throwing self will look back and thank you.

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  #26  
Old 12-14-2019, 01:57 PM
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Bardu Bardu is online now
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A Buzzz is good for forehand. I personally am one of those people that use an overstable disc as a crutch for forehand, so I prefer a Firebird.

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  #27  
Old 12-15-2019, 03:13 AM
disco40 disco40 is online now
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Originally Posted by DiscFifty View Post
Before the flood of "use overstable" discs for fh, since you are "learning" how to throw fh, consider learning with an understable disc and learning how to hyzer flip it via fh. Your future fh throwing self will look back and thank you.
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Originally Posted by Bardu View Post
A Buzzz is good for forehand. I personally am one of those people that use an overstable disc as a crutch for forehand, so I prefer a Firebird.
Decided I'm going to try to learn with both overstable and understable discs, equal work on each type. Question is whether to learn on a midrange or something else. Would it be crazy to take, say, a Buzz, a BuzzOS, and a BuzzSS and just drill with those three?

I picked up a Destroyer on the cheap that feels so good in my forehand grip. Is this common, that a thicker rim feels very comfortable and a thinner rim feels like I'm holding a paper plate? Very different feel than backhanded.

On that note, boy do I throw that Destroyer consistently backhanded. It's noodle distance for sure, but I can roll over my wrist and throw it to the same damn spot every time, about 220 feet with a steep crashing finish. I know that's not what the disc is meant for and I risk hurting my form, but it's tempting to keep that in my bag for when that shot is useful.
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  #28  
Old 12-15-2019, 03:38 AM
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Odedge Odedge is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disco40 View Post
Decided I'm going to try to learn with both overstable and understable discs, equal work on each type. Question is whether to learn on a midrange or something else. Would it be crazy to take, say, a Buzz, a BuzzOS, and a BuzzSS and just drill with those three?
I wouldn't go anything higher than a midrange, so those assortments of Buzzzzes should work well. I would work with them until you can at least throw them 250' fairly consistently. Each type of stability has its purpose, the key is to learn how to throw each disc correctly.

If you try to learn how to throw a BuzzOS to land fairly straight and not realizing what it's doing to your form, you will probably create bad habits. When you can throw each one "flat" and let the disc do the work, you are starting to throw the disc at the proper speed and form.

After that, then you can start shaping more shorts by manipulating these discs with more hyzer or anhyzer.

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  #29  
Old 12-19-2019, 08:00 AM
DiscFifty DiscFifty is offline
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Originally Posted by disco40 View Post
On that note, boy do I throw that Destroyer consistently backhanded. It's noodle distance for sure, but I can roll over my wrist and throw it to the same damn spot every time, about 220 feet with a steep crashing finish. I know that's not what the disc is meant for and I risk hurting my form, but it's tempting to keep that in my bag for when that shot is useful.
All kinds of no in that post. Throw it on a hyzer for a meat hook crash and burn....sure! But don't roll the wrist...at least not on purpose in this early stage of learning how to throw. Like the above user said, throw flat as often as possible and let the discs do what they are intended to do. Learn to throw correctly now, shape shots later.

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  #30  
Old 12-26-2019, 03:10 PM
disco40 disco40 is online now
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Originally Posted by DiscFifty View Post
All kinds of no in that post. Throw it on a hyzer for a meat hook crash and burn....sure! But don't roll the wrist...at least not on purpose in this early stage of learning how to throw. Like the above user said, throw flat as often as possible and let the discs do what they are intended to do. Learn to throw correctly now, shape shots later.
The rebuke is appreciated, lol. I really like the feel of wider rims (even though I don't have large hands), but I'm definitely not ready for them. I've left them out of my bag the last few times.
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