#11  
Old 11-25-2020, 01:59 PM
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Jukeshoe Jukeshoe is offline
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Originally Posted by HyzerUniBomber View Post
99% you should focus on: learning to swing and throw from your plant leg.

1% that new players focus on: throwing hard or buying plastic.
Perfect answer. /thread
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  #12  
Old 11-25-2020, 02:08 PM
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armiller armiller is offline
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There are many things in the 1%. I think reachback is one of those things. Throwing hard is definitely in there too. But come on, buying plastic is part of the fun! You can't totally nix that, even though you should definitely focus on trying some putters/mids or low speed fairways to start.

My summary for the 99% would be that you should focus on the lower body, particularly hips and weight shift. All these things we talk about are generating power from the ground up, but newer players try to start from the top.
[/RESTART THREAD...maybe]

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Originally Posted by Halbrust View Post
In every hobby/sport/skill that I've done in the past there is always the 99% you should focus on, and the 1% that most everyone (especially new people) focus on.
I'm curious what other 99%-1% examples you're thinking of, because I have never really thought this about any sport or hobby previously.

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Old 11-25-2020, 02:26 PM
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[Restart Thread]
There are many things in the 1%. I think reachback is one of those things. Throwing hard is definitely in there too. But come on, buying plastic is part of the fun! You can't totally nix that, even though you should definitely focus on trying some putters/mids or low speed fairways to start.

My summary for the 99% would be that you should focus on the lower body, particularly hips and weight shift. All these things we talk about are generating power from the ground up, but newer players try to start from the top.
[/RESTART THREAD...maybe]



I'm curious what other 99%-1% examples you're thinking of, because I have never really thought this about any sport or hobby previously.
I think there is a fairly universal pattern that applies to this phenomenon. Flashy end-game results attract a noob's attention, but the noob does not possess the 'sight' to even understand what they are looking at.

I started bouldering when I was about 18, and quickly concentrated on strength. One armed pull-ups! Holding full body levers/flags for as long as I can! Get ripped!

Only to watch a slender 15 year old female come absolutely crush a problem I can't do with footwork, leverage, and technical finesse. Yes, eventually all of these aspects become important, pure strength included, but ignorance can cause extreme imbalances in one's perception of what contributes to a skill.

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  #14  
Old 11-25-2020, 02:31 PM
Halbrust Halbrust is offline
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I'm curious what other 99%-1% examples you're thinking of, because I have never really thought this about any sport or hobby previously.
Beer brewing, weight lifting/body building, and jiu jitsu are the first three that come to mind.

In brewing people seem to focus on the possible problems rather than good process. I hear a lot of talk about hot side aeration, autolysis, and oxygenation. When you can ignore that and make great beer 99.99% of the time as long as you use good ingredients, good water, and good sanitation. Even water chemistry can be put into that 1%.

In weight training way too much focus is put on secondary and tertiary lifts. i.e. The angle of the bar when doing tricep extensions rather than bench press form. The three big lifts are called the big three for a reason, but people want to skip past that and do all the variations.

In Jiu Jitsu the 1% is the flying and rolling submissions, or the complex guards. Even though the arm bar and rear naked choke are what's winning world championships. It's the things that are taught on day one, and then practiced ten thousand times that are the most effective. The really cool moves work for a select few, or on a select occasions.

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Old 11-25-2020, 02:45 PM
UhhNegative UhhNegative is offline
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Originally Posted by Halbrust View Post

In weight training way too much focus is put on secondary and tertiary lifts. i.e. The angle of the bar when doing tricep extensions rather than bench press form. The three big lifts are called the big three for a reason, but people want to skip past that and do all the variations.
I would say for weight training, supplements is the 1%. All people want to talk about in the gym is what pre-workout they are taking, what type of new-fangled creatine complex they just found, or what the best protein powder is. But they don't know about training program philosophy (basic things like progressive overload) or tracking macros. But hey, what do I know, haven't been to the gym in months...
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Old 11-25-2020, 02:51 PM
Halbrust Halbrust is offline
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I would say for weight training, supplements is the 1%. All people want to talk about in the gym is what pre-workout they are taking, what type of new-fangled creatine complex they just found, or what the best protein powder is. But they don't know about training program philosophy (basic things like progressive overload) or tracking macros. But hey, what do I know, haven't been to the gym in months...
I would put supplements on the 1% of diet. But, yeah.
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  #17  
Old 11-25-2020, 02:51 PM
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Countchunkula Countchunkula is offline
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Originally Posted by Jukeshoe View Post
Perfect answer. /thread
I like the new avatar and sig line, Juke. The phrase "massive headwind Harry" used to be in pretty common usage in our dg group.
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  #18  
Old 11-25-2020, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by UhhNegative View Post
I would say for weight training, supplements is the 1%. All people want to talk about in the gym is what pre-workout they are taking, what type of new-fangled creatine complex they just found, or what the best protein powder is. But they don't know about training program philosophy (basic things like progressive overload) or tracking macros. But hey, what do I know, haven't been to the gym in months...
Haha, that's a great example. It just seems like human nature to seek out magic bullets that will eliminate the need for disciplined, incremental progress.

Talking about things, spending money on things, anything but sitting there throwing mids into a pile 130 feet away!

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  #19  
Old 11-25-2020, 03:05 PM
UhhNegative UhhNegative is offline
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Originally Posted by RowingBoats View Post
Haha, that's a great example. It just seems like human nature to seek out magic bullets that will eliminate the need for disciplined, incremental progress.

Talking about things, spending money on things, anything but sitting there throwing mids into a pile 130 feet away!
Who throws a mid from 130 feet? But I get what you are saying.

Or the fact that I've spent far more hours on this forum than actually throwing, at least in the last few years, but its fun... sometimes.

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  #20  
Old 11-25-2020, 03:21 PM
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azplaya25 azplaya25 is offline
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Originally Posted by Halbrust View Post
In every hobby/sport/skill that I've done in the past there is always the 99% you should focus on, and the 1% that most everyone (especially new people) focus on.

I haven't quite honed in on that in disc golf yet.

Is DG the unicorn that doesn't have this?

The 99% is feeling the weight of the disc, and using gravity/momentum to propel that weight. 1% is picking up the disc and throw it as hard as you can, and believing that you can throw it further by just trying harder or being stronger.
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