#11  
Old 08-29-2016, 12:06 PM
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Putt for D'oh Putt for D'oh is offline
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Originally Posted by HyzerUniBomber View Post

This is to say that when I see players lining up the disc out front of themselves, I understand that they're working out the where the disc line is headed and the trajectory - but that's different than lining up the body to avoid over-opening the shoulders.
When I see this it always makes me think of a little kid, like Tee Ball age, aiming the baseball like its he's throwing darts then goes through a giant wind up and hucks the ball way high and right.
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  #12  
Old 08-30-2016, 10:17 AM
timothy42b timothy42b is offline
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Originally Posted by HyzerUniBomber View Post
.

This is to say that when I see players lining up the disc out front of themselves, I understand that they're working out the where the disc line is headed and the trajectory - but that's different than lining up the body to avoid over-opening the shoulders.
So they're looking at an imagined release point that is a couple feet past their actual release point?
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Old 08-30-2016, 10:19 AM
timothy42b timothy42b is offline
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Originally Posted by ohtobediscing View Post
I certainly don't waste the time and effort of "pointing" the disc at the target and then reaching it back several times. .
I see a LOT of people do this putting - sometimes 20 times. Or until they're slowing down play.
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Old 08-30-2016, 11:07 AM
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HyzerUniBomber HyzerUniBomber is offline
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Originally Posted by timothy42b View Post
So they're looking at an imagined release point that is a couple feet past their actual release point?
Further out. I can only speak for myself, but if I will sometimes try to work out my trajectory and disc angles for the apex of the flight.
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Old 08-30-2016, 12:07 PM
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TheBeardedFatGuy TheBeardedFatGuy is offline
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Keep in mind that the extension of the arm doesn't extend towards the target while the disc is in your hand. This picture shows the shoulder alignment with the forearm extension along with the line he's actually throwing on.

This is to say that when I see players lining up the disc out front of themselves, I understand that they're working out the where the disc line is headed and the trajectory - but that's different than lining up the body to avoid over-opening the shoulders.
Remember, I did say I do a standing throw, so my body is turned 90 degrees, with my throwing shoulder towards the target, so extending my arm towards the target does simulate the release point give or take a few degrees. I've seen the footage of the pros, and I know their release point is much sooner than you expect it to be (which seems odd when you watch it because it seems to go against logic), but you can't argue with results. And that's really my point - I don't extend my arm towards my line arbitrarily. I know pretty much how the disc is going to go from experience. What would be the point in extending my arm on one line, and have the disc go out on a completely different one? Why would anyone do that over and over and continue to think it will work 'this' time? I mean, come on.
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Old 08-31-2016, 05:43 AM
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rhatton1 rhatton1 is offline
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Originally Posted by TheBeardedFatGuy View Post
Remember, I did say I do a standing throw, so my body is turned 90 degrees, with my throwing shoulder towards the target, so extending my arm towards the target does simulate the release point give or take a few degrees. I've seen the footage of the pros, and I know their release point is much sooner than you expect it to be (which seems odd when you watch it because it seems to go against logic), but you can't argue with results. And that's really my point - I don't extend my arm towards my line arbitrarily. I know pretty much how the disc is going to go from experience. What would be the point in extending my arm on one line, and have the disc go out on a completely different one? Why would anyone do that over and over and continue to think it will work 'this' time? I mean, come on.
Should make no difference, X step is just adding momentum and making the standstill throw more dynamic - it shouldn't change the angles you are trying to achieve.

If your release/contact point is out in front of your body on a line to the target, you are rounding and slipping and every now and again probably "hitting" it and griplocking big out to the right. If you've practiced this motion enough you might not even get the griplocks.

Their (pros/big drivers) release point is not "sooner" their body angles mean they are extending the contact point as far forward and late as possible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeardedFatGuy View Post
Why would anyone do that over and over and continue to think it will work 'this' time? I mean, come on.
Because the disc slips out early, they don't get a full "hit", the disc goes in the right direction, their internet distance estimate tells them it was a massive throw and a negative feedback loop is created making them do the same thing over and over without realising their is a better and more efficient way to throw more repeatably accurately and far.

Last edited by rhatton1; 08-31-2016 at 05:43 AM. Reason: For grammarz and stuff.
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Old 08-31-2016, 05:52 AM
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Originally Posted by HyzerUniBomber View Post

Love this image.

Disc will be released halfway between disc one and disc two in the picture so at release the arms still got about 45 degrees to move before hitting the target line.

If you're lining up the disc straight ahead you're doing yourself a disservice, a this in no way replicates a good body position.

(seeing this is a pet peeve)
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Old 08-31-2016, 09:33 AM
timothy42b timothy42b is offline
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Originally Posted by HyzerUniBomber View Post
Further out. I can only speak for myself, but if I will sometimes try to work out my trajectory and disc angles for the apex of the flight.
I see I didn't explain well.

If I point my arm toward the target before throwing, and think that is going to be the release point (remember from the hit backwards) then I'm dead wrong.

The real release point should be long before the arm gets pointing at the target? I think I've misunderstood this all along.
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Old 08-31-2016, 09:37 AM
timothy42b timothy42b is offline
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Originally Posted by rhatton1 View Post

If your release/contact point is out in front of your body on a line to the target, you are rounding and slipping and every now and again probably "hitting" it and griplocking big out to the right.
Light bulb! That makes sense to me. My longest throws have been those that go right, now I maybe see why.

Trying to pull close to my chest is the confusing part of this.
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  #20  
Old 09-02-2016, 08:34 AM
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rhatton1 rhatton1 is offline
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Originally Posted by timothy42b View Post

Trying to pull close to my chest is the confusing part of this.
This isn't perfect but might help you visualise it. Stand up as though you're going to drive.

Make a right angle between your upper arm and your chest.

Keep this angle stationary throughout, don't extend or collapse the upper arm/chest angle at any point.

Now attempt to reach back and slowly pull through and extend the lower arm into the hit whilst keeping that upper arm angle the whole way (back,forwards and only releasing in the follow through)

To do this you have to use your hips, as you settle your weight and the hips come forward the disc will move into the chest, as the hips brace and you begin to open up forward the lower arm will start swinging outwards, it will feel like the disc is going on an out/in/out arc but in fact it will be moving nearly straight.

Don't try to throw like this just do it to get the concept. A lot of rounding comes from collapsing that upper arm angle and then the shoulders then get in front of the throw.
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