#31  
Old 05-08-2012, 09:08 AM
Widdershins Widdershins is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IronJack View Post
On longer tunnels, where I just want my par, my strategy is that I throw whatever I believe has the highest percentage of staying true on my intended line for about 60% of the distance to the tee. Then I'll park with confidence. Takes out the possibility of birdie, but it keeps you at a par. I'd rather go for the birdie on holes with higher percentages.

For example: 350' tunnel. Much of your competition will try to bomb it down the gap. Some will get birdies, most will be lucky to get a par. You throw it 200 feet down the middle. Then pick up and approach 150 feet for the park job and drop in par. Easy peasy.

It's a very conservative strategy, but it works for my theory of winning by not making costly mistakes, playing for par, and picking up birdies where they present themselves.

The Opto Pure has been killing this part of my game for me lately.
I too am a fan of playing safe depending on the situation and the strength of the competition. In the Pro divisions many times a par loses a stroke to the field (even on a tight hole) so you have to accept the risk and go for it early in a match. However, on a long, two drive tunnel laying up to a landing zone may well be the smartest option.

There are some poorly designed holes where there is no clearly defined fairway. Here it makes no sense to try to play safe. Where there is no safe option don't worry about it, pray for the best and throw it hard enough to get there.

The key to tunnels is to hit the first gap cleanly. So rather than concentrating on how the drive might finish, I try to make sure it hits the first gap at the proper speed. To do this I imagine my target is the first gap, not the basket.

The surest way to miss a tunnel is to throw too hard. A controlled, balanced, smooth shot has a vastly better chance of success. The extra 20 feet an all out drive could potentially give you is not worth the much higher risk.
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  #32  
Old 05-08-2012, 09:09 AM
rexdp10 rexdp10 is offline
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when it is a straight tight fairway its usually comets and rocs looking for par, maybe making birdie. If there is a tight fairway with bends its generally PDs flicking or powered down backhand.
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  #33  
Old 05-08-2012, 09:11 AM
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BogeyNoMore BogeyNoMore is offline
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Tight and controlled doesn't always means straight.
Sometimes, a flippy leopard or comet, or an overstable drone will help you hold a tight line that snakes through the trees and shrubbery... all depends on the shot.

Keys are to:
1) throttle down and get a smooth release.
2) use a disc you can control predictably to execute the line you wanna hit.

Last edited by BogeyNoMore; 05-08-2012 at 09:15 AM.
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  #34  
Old 05-08-2012, 09:14 AM
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jtreadwell jtreadwell is offline
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My home course is tight as hell, so I learned really early that control > distance on all but the most open holes. I use my Mamba or SL for a hyzer flip if there's a little room, or my roc or banger for a backhand if there isn't.
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  #35  
Old 05-08-2012, 09:55 AM
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DiscJunkie DiscJunkie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Violets caddy View Post
Practice, practice, practice!
Tight fairways can be your best friend in a tournament because so much of the field is going to struggle.
Did someone say PRACTICE???
Where do you get off saying something like that?
All I need is a little advice...

No offense to the OP, but,

LOL
Seriously, practice, practice, practice.
Go and throw your whole bag on a tight tunnel, a few dozen times, to find out what works for you. And then practice some more.
No easy raod to excellence. You work your *ss off.
Seriously.
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  #36  
Old 05-08-2012, 10:52 AM
Stud Muffin Stud Muffin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leftyone View Post
Just curious to see what you guys use as far as strategy/technique and equipment when your playing a tournament with in your opinion tight fairways. I played one this weekend that was wide open for the first round and tight for the second round. I struggled quite a bit during round two.
First, I want to say if you have a forehand shot, work on that in tight areas.

Now if you are unable/unwilling to throw a lot of forehand shots, this takes some practice, but works quite well, though distance is drastically reduced.

I believe the reason forehand is so successful is simply because you are able to see the target as well as get good torque on the disc at the same time. Easier to develop eye/hand coordination.

So, I do a walk up and only turn my hips about 25% so that my throwing target is never out of my sight. It takes a lot off of throws, but you become very accurate with practice. Another good side effect is you really key in on your release point, and the more you do it, the more you will be willing to turn away from the target to the point you will make full backhand shots, x step included, into these tight spaces. That takes time to develop.

Because wooded areas are typically protected from wind, it is more common to throw a less stable disc with less low speed fade. Element & River get's a lot of play in those situations for me.

Last edited by Stud Muffin; 05-08-2012 at 10:55 AM.
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  #37  
Old 05-08-2012, 10:59 AM
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Dan Ensor Dan Ensor is offline
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Depends on the fairway. If there's a low ceiling, I'll throw a putter. If not, I'm probably throwing an overhand of some sort.
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  #38  
Old 05-08-2012, 11:08 AM
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discmeister discmeister is offline
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For tunnel shots ceilings, I throw/flip Fuses, Leos, light RRs, and Visions depending on the conditions and line.
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  #39  
Old 05-08-2012, 03:19 PM
leftyone leftyone is offline
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Thanks for all of the replies. This may shed a little more light on everything thing. I played intermediate (845 rating) the first round ob was not a stroke, basically drop where you went ob and play on. The second round we played with all the ob's as the open and advanced did. Basically everything outside of the fairway was ob. Took a 13 on one hole (it was stroke and distance).... just was never able to recover from it.
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  #40  
Old 05-08-2012, 03:34 PM
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sidewinding sidewinding is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BogeyNoMore View Post
Tight and controlled doesn't always means straight.
Sometimes, a flippy leopard or comet, or an overstable drone will help you hold a tight line that snakes through the trees and shrubbery... all depends on the shot.

Keys are to:
1) throttle down and get a smooth release.
2) use a disc you can control predictably to execute the line you wanna hit.
This is my favorite answer so far. Pretty much exactly what I wanted to say. I will add that you need to relax and be confident. If you are tense and afraid you'll hit a tree every time.
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