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Old 02-13-2018, 09:52 AM
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Default Tee Pad Costs

I know there are a couple of old threads on this topic, but I am hoping for a little more concrete, pun very much intended, information on the cost of installing tee pads.

First, I am looking for someone that has recently installed concrete tee pads. I am looking at installing 6-9 concrete tee pads, either 12x5 foot or 10x5 foot and would like to get a rough estimate on the cost. Through my research I have seen that the most cost effective way is to have the concrete delivered but I could only find that info for installing 18 tee pads. If I end up only installing 6 do they normally deliver smaller amounts, I was under the impression that most places have a required amount.

Those are some of my basic questions, but I am interested in any info, tips, etc from anyone that has installed concrete pads.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 02-13-2018, 10:05 AM
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A 12x5 teepad requires right around 3/4 of a cubic yard of concrete. Most trucks can carry around 9 cubic yards (I actually think that's the DOT limit in OH) so if you're doing 9 teepads you're going to be using close to a full load.

Right now, in N. KY, a cubic yard of concrete is going for right around $105/cubic yard give or take. (Delivered) That number can go up or down based on the precise mix you're going for. (PSI rating, air entrained or not, cold weather additives, etc.)
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Old 02-13-2018, 10:17 AM
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Obviously a large concrete truck can't drive all around most dg courses. If you have the equipment (skid steer, tractor, etc.) It might make more sense to pour all the slabs in a central, easily accessed location. Then after they cure move them into place with the equipment.

You'd definitely need to reinforce the slabs if you go this route. (I'd reinforce regardless.) A grid of welded wire mesh and/or #4 (1/2") rebar would do the job.

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Last edited by InnocentCrook; 02-13-2018 at 10:20 AM.
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:07 AM
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^Yea if you have a bad area for a concrete truck to move around in, it might be better to pour and move them later. But if you are worried about moving them, don't have the right equipment or are just want to pour them at the holes to make sure they fit it properly, you might be able to find someone that has a smaller mobile concrete mixer. Don't know what the cost difference might be, though...
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by brutalbrutus View Post
^Yea if you have a bad area for a concrete truck to move around in, it might be better to pour and move them later. But if you are worried about moving them, don't have the right equipment or are just want to pour them at the holes to make sure they fit it properly, you might be able to find someone that has a smaller mobile concrete mixer. Don't know what the cost difference might be, though...
There's also concrete buggies that you could rent. Little powerized dump carts that can hold about a pad's worth of concrete so you can shuttle it from the loading spot to the actual pad location.

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Old 02-13-2018, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by InnocentCrook View Post
There's also concrete buggies that you could rent. Little powerized dump carts that can hold about a pad's worth of concrete so you can shuttle it from the loading spot to the actual pad location.
This can also be done with a front end loader on a tractor of sufficient size.

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Old 02-13-2018, 11:27 AM
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This can also be done with a front end loader on a tractor of sufficient size.
Yep.

There's even concrete hopper attachments for skid steers that I've seen. The concrete guy that did the foundation work on my house used one for some of the frost footers.

Lots of ways to skin this cat.
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Old 02-13-2018, 07:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InnocentCrook View Post
A 12x5 teepad requires right around 3/4 of a cubic yard of concrete. Most trucks can carry around 9 cubic yards (I actually think that's the DOT limit in OH) so if you're doing 9 teepads you're going to be using close to a full load.

Right now, in N. KY, a cubic yard of concrete is going for right around $105/cubic yard give or take. (Delivered) That number can go up or down based on the precise mix you're going for. (PSI rating, air entrained or not, cold weather additives, etc.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by InnocentCrook View Post
Obviously a large concrete truck can't drive all around most dg courses. If you have the equipment (skid steer, tractor, etc.) It might make more sense to pour all the slabs in a central, easily accessed location. Then after they cure move them into place with the equipment.

You'd definitely need to reinforce the slabs if you go this route. (I'd reinforce regardless.) A grid of welded wire mesh and/or #4 (1/2") rebar would do the job.
I think we could do a central pour location and have them moved. The parks department has a couple of tractors and what not, and I have a decent relationship with the maintenance department after putting in a ton of work on the course last summer.

So if the prices are close to what you stated, I realize it will change by location and like you said the mix, but it sounds like I could prob do 9 tee pads for around $1000-$1200, does that sounds about right. Including the mesh/rebar and the 2x4s for the framing.
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by roadtripstuff View Post
I think we could do a central pour location and have them moved. The parks department has a couple of tractors and what not, and I have a decent relationship with the maintenance department after putting in a ton of work on the course last summer.

So if the prices are close to what you stated, I realize it will change by location and like you said the mix, but it sounds like I could prob do 9 tee pads for around $1000-$1200, does that sounds about right. Including the mesh/rebar and the 2x4s for the framing.
Probably in the right neighborhood.

Don't forget you'll want a nice level, compacted stone gravel base prepared when you go to put the pads in place. Some additional costs there too.
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Old 02-16-2018, 10:44 AM
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if you are only looking at only the raw materials cost then yea, sure, you might be in the neighborhood. But you really need to take into account all of the real costs. The amount of prep work for each teepad is a lot of time. Time is money. The tools required to move the concrete to the right spot on the course costs money. For a contractor to do everything, I've found it closer to ~$500-$750 per teepad neighborhood. Maybe a more upscale neighborhood. So, costs for teepads can vary widely depending on who is doing the work. For a public park you might be required (because of liability) to go with the more expensive options. Good luck!
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