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Old 03-11-2017, 11:54 AM
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GoobyPls GoobyPls is offline
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Default Stuck at 260'

I've been throwing around 260' on average and can't seem to figure out what do to next. So this week, I finally got around to filming myself at field practice. Looking at the results, I can already see for the first set of throws I wasn't keeping my left arm down. But beyond that, I could use some feedback. Go ahead and let me have it, it's not going to bruise my ego or anything

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Last edited by GoobyPls; 03-11-2017 at 11:56 AM. Reason: Working on video embedding
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Old 03-11-2017, 12:01 PM
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Lumberjack504 Lumberjack504 is offline
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You're definitely rounding or curling your arm and disc in the reachback/backswing. Need to turn those shoulders and hips and get the body out of the way of the backswing and keep the arm out wide. I'm sure others with better experience will chime in (my form is a work in progress as well), but that's the main thing I noticed.


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Old 03-11-2017, 12:03 PM
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Lynn LeFey Lynn LeFey is offline
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I've only been playing a little while, so take this with a grain of salt, but...

It looks to me like you're throwing nose-up and all your discs are climbing hard once they leave your grip. This might cause them to climb and stall prematurely.

I hope someone more knowledgeable comes along and either confirms what I'm seeing or gives you a better explanation.

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Old 03-11-2017, 12:19 PM
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GoobyPls GoobyPls is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn LeFey View Post
I've only been playing a little while, so take this with a grain of salt, but...

It looks to me like you're throwing nose-up and all your discs are climbing hard once they leave your grip. This might cause them to climb and stall prematurely.

I hope someone more knowledgeable comes along and either confirms what I'm seeing or gives you a better explanation.
You're right in this case, and a big part of that was that I was throwing into a headwind. Normally I prefer a crosswind for field practice, but that was the only spot where I could throw away from other people at the park and still have concrete under me the entire runup.
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Old 03-11-2017, 01:31 PM
Zphix Zphix is offline
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I'm still working on my form and over the last few days I think I've had some breakthroughs but take what I say with that in mind. I see a lot of the same issues I've had within your video.

Rounding was already addressed so I won't beat a dead horse. Although, I think you're rounding because of how you're planting your feet - planting open straight onto your heel means you can't turn your shoulder fully/reachback in a straight line without putting strain on your front knee causing you to round.

Also, because you're planting into an open stance your weight is tipping over your front leg (same problem I'm dealing with right now!). In your case, though, it looks like you're planting your foot long before your reachback is done so by the time you actually start to throw all you have is your upper body. When you throw, you want to swing inside your posture, and you want to be finishing your reachback as your front toes are coming down.

Last bit of advice is to slow wwwaaayyyy down if you're trying to improve your form. Simon Lizotte said it best; slow feet, fast hands.






and I'd also recommend starting out with stand-still form; throwing from a standstill doesn't drain any power you have and I've hit over 350' from stand-still.



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Old 03-11-2017, 01:32 PM
treekickluv treekickluv is offline
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A fine example of strong arming.
Your reachback is basicly your arm.
you should be turning your hips and shoulders back in an axis. While having the disc in a straight line towards where you are throwing.

Begin the throw with your weight on the backfoot.(on your toes)

Then as you turn your shoulders and hips back begin to stride forward to plant your front fot.. and push your weight with your hips into your front leg.

The throwing motion allways begins with your hips.

Shoulder is what finshes your throw.

And bend your knees. your falling like a lamppost
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Old 03-12-2017, 11:06 AM
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I'd go ahead and pack up your speed 7 discs and above, and completely stop running up. You need to get the fundamentals of the reach back and pull through down before you move any further. You have a lot of issues with your x-step and balance, but it's useless to work on if you can't pull on a straight line. Do the one step throws seen in Loopghost's feet together drill, and combine this with the Beto drill to hold onto the disc (with your hand on the outside of the disc [NOT CURLING YOUR ARM AROUND IT]) as long as you can before releasing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pleUjYKwf0g

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nED7gcXobEo
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Old 03-12-2017, 02:51 PM
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I agree with first getting the arm motion right from a standstill, as there's still enough aspects you have to concentrate on. You don't want to have all the variables from an X-step when you try to focus on a single aspect of your arm motion. I at least had a lot of success throwing from a standstill first ... later moving the right foot only one step to the front. Now I slowly start adding the X-step. I think it's most important to allow you to concentrate on a single aspect of the overall throwing motion in each training session. The more variables you can eliminate the better for your training success.
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Old 03-12-2017, 03:27 PM
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I would say it's fine to start with the one step.
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Old 03-12-2017, 07:56 PM
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All that stuff above and...
http://web.archive.org/web/201604082...61618cc3635d51

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