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View Poll Results: What is the highest speed you consider to be a fairway driver?
Speed 7 38 29.23%
Speed 8 50 38.46%
Speed 9 32 24.62%
Speed 10 8 6.15%
Other 2 1.54%
Voters: 130. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 03-14-2012, 01:31 PM
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Default Max Speed Cut-off for Fairway Drivers

There have been quite a few threads here lately about fairway drivers. I am curious what everyone's opinion is on this subject.

With the new warp speeders out there going up to "14," where does that put the cut-off for true fairway drivers? Personally, I am using anything higher than a 7 as a Max D, but I think this is all dependent on your strength/speed.

So, what do you all think? Weigh in on the poll and let's come to a consensus about the speed range we are talking about when we talk about fairways.
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  #2  
Old 03-14-2012, 01:37 PM
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I went with other. Most flight ratings are fuzzy at best, speed included. Combine that with a very gray line between what is considered a "fairway" driver and a "Max D" driver and you have a very nebulous answer.
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Old 03-14-2012, 01:47 PM
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8. warp speeds should start gettin their own catergory instead of pushing up other types speed.
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Old 03-14-2012, 01:57 PM
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Innova considers anything 9 or above a distance driver. I'm good with that. I'd be fine with them raising the bar to 10.

I might also point out that some discs have have their speed numbers adjusted a notch. The Eagle and Teebird I believe were both 8's back in the time when 10 was the top of the scale and there was no distinction between a fairway driver and a distance driver. They were all distance drivers or "ultra long range drivers". I want to also say the Firebird was a speed 10, but can't confirm it.

In all honestly, I think we're doing new players trying to find the right disc for them a disservice when we insist the speed and stability ratings for a disc can be put into nice neat categories that they can count on as being gospel. In practice, things aren't so nice and neat. Disc charts should be considered a relative guideline, nothing more.
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Old 03-14-2012, 02:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scarpfish View Post
In all honestly, I think we're doing new players trying to find the right disc for them a disservice when we insist the speed and stability ratings for a disc can be put into nice neat categories that they can count on as being gospel. In practice, things aren't so nice and neat. Disc charts should be considered a relative guideline, nothing more.
Having just started playing last year, I agree with you 100%. Way more education of new players is needed to make sure they don't waste their money on discs they can't handle. I take that as my responsibility when introducing someone new to the sport. However, the disc companies could be a little more responsible with what they stock at the big box stores, too. I have never found a Leopard or Teebird at my local sporting goods store, but I for damn sure can find a ton of Destroyers.
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Old 03-14-2012, 02:12 PM
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I voted 8 and I'm very confident with that.

Once you start getting to the 1.9cm rim width the discs seem to get more nose angle sensitive and harder to control than the 1.7cm discs. There aren't that many 1.8cm discs and whether or not they're as controllable as the 1.7cm discs or a bit more on the tougher to control side like the 1.9cm discs is kind of split.

If you're going to categorize discs into "speed" classes like fairway driver and distance driver then it makes sense to have a definite cut off. Someone may use a slow distance driver as their "control" driver, but that doesn't mean it should be in the same speed class as other, slower discs.
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Old 03-14-2012, 02:14 PM
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Id say from 6-9 with a couple hybrid exceptions on both ends
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Old 03-14-2012, 02:19 PM
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I think the definition is a little arbitrary, and as courses grow longer following the newer, faster, longer drivers that are available, the definition (distancewise) of a fairway driver changes to suit, somewhat. I think the relative speed ratings, as they relate to power, are more helpful than name classifications...definitely agree with Scarp's input here.

Innova has four categories including "Fairway"....Discraft has five, with no mention of "Fairway" (but three levels of drivers).

Given that speed classifications can vary somewhat, I'd say that it's not super important either way, but if I had to give numbers, I'd say that 6-8 should be fairway. Above that I'd put it into two other driver categories. So maybe something like this: Putt, Approach/Putt, Mids, Fairway, Distance Drivers, and Long Range Drivers. The problem here is all of the tweener discs, and the fact that the longer distance that some understable discs can give underpowered throwers can blur the lines a bit as far as named categories - to newer players, anyway. The names are helpful for marketing, and they're simple, but I'd much rather people just learn the speeds and ratings instead. That's a bit complex for new players and chucker types, though.
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Old 03-14-2012, 02:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garublador View Post
If you're going to categorize discs into "speed" classes like fairway driver and distance driver then it makes sense to have a definite cut off. Someone may use a slow distance driver as their "control" driver, but that doesn't mean it should be in the same speed class as other, slower discs.
I like the idea of using the disc measurements more openly, because that is what it seems like things are based off of, anyway. I just wish it were listed on the disc instead of having to hunt through the PDGA specs sheet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oklahyzer View Post
The names are helpful for marketing, and they're simple, but I'd much rather people just learn the speeds and ratings instead. That's a bit complex for new players and chucker types, though.
I agree with you on this, but I would be willing to bet there are experienced players on here who are confused about the line, as well. Or maybe there just doesn't need to be a hard line.

Either way, this is all good conversation. Keep it coming.
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  #10  
Old 03-14-2012, 02:49 PM
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The speed you use for a Fairway driver is totally dependent on your skill level.
I've seen guys throwing Bosses from the fairway and they should've been throwing Rocs or even a putter.
I use Cheetahs (Spd 6) for most of my fairway distance throws, but if it's wide open or if I can "see" the line and I'm confident in it, I'll pull out a beat-in JLS (Spd 9).
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