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Old 08-19-2016, 09:01 PM
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Blobfish Blobfish is offline
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Default Roller disc physics

I've seen many posts which say things like, "such and such would make a good roller after it gets beat in" but wouldn't the ideal roller disc be a stable disc with the largest possible moment of inertia?


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Old 08-19-2016, 09:46 PM
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armiller armiller is offline
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Lots of factors. First, I assume you're talking backhand rollers. I think when people say that they simply mean that the disc is flippy enough that you can get some good "yoink" on it to make it land on its edge. In my experience, people don't usually think much beyond that, though maybe you roll with better players than I do.

I suppose a large moment of inertia would theoretically mean more resistance to deceleration. In practice, I don't think there's a big enough difference between discs for this to be a big factor. Instead, maybe the biggest thing is where the center of mass is. E.g. if the center of mass is directly above the edge that contacts the ground while rolling, there is no torque on the disc. That means the disc will experience less precession and should theoretically roll farther.

That's basically me thinking out loud. I don't think it's glaringly wrong...
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Old 08-19-2016, 10:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armiller View Post
Lots of factors. First, I assume you're talking backhand rollers. I think when people say that they simply mean that the disc is flippy enough that you can get some good "yoink" on it to make it land on its edge. In my experience, people don't usually think much beyond that, though maybe you roll with better players than I do.

I suppose a large moment of inertia would theoretically mean more resistance to deceleration. In practice, I don't think there's a big enough difference between discs for this to be a big factor. Instead, maybe the biggest thing is where the center of mass is. E.g. if the center of mass is directly above the edge that contacts the ground while rolling, there is no torque on the disc. That means the disc will experience less precession and should theoretically roll farther.

That's basically me thinking out loud. I don't think it's glaringly wrong...


Nah, I don't roll with anyone haha, I was just trying to understand the roller shot. The further out the mass is from center--like you said, right over the rolling edge--the greater the moment of inertia, that's why I thought that maximizing it was key.

I thought the roller was a throw specifically designed to get most of its distance on the ground?


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Old 08-19-2016, 11:40 PM
Pbmercil Pbmercil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indy View Post
I thought the roller was a throw specifically designed to get most of its distance on the ground?
It can be, but not always. There are lots of different ways to roll a disc. Players with great roller games can and will throw them 300+ before they hit the ground.

A more useful way to think of a roller is a way to get a backhand throw to finish hard to the right (right hand backhand)

Most Players want to get their rollers to finish to the right, and a roller does this by falling on its flight plate. Its much much more difficult to get a stable disc to hit the ground, stand up, and fall onto its flight plate. It's not impossible, and it can be useful. But they need a huge anny angle, a lot of height, and they finish pretty straight. It's much easier to do that with an understsble disc.

I realize you were asking more about the physics then the technique, which isn't really my cup of tea.
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