#31  
Old 08-23-2019, 12:16 AM
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sidewinder22 sidewinder22 is offline
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Originally Posted by R-Ogre View Post
I have a hypothesis that with good form spin rate mostly correlates with arm speed. As evidence, let’s look at the 500’ putter throws. The only way to get a putter out that far without turn and burn is if there’s a lot more spin on it than you and I can do-it would be like throwing into a 30+ mph headwind.
I agree spin rate mostly correlates to speed as spin is a byproduct of leverage, but think you are neglecting other more important variables like trajectory, nose angle, and wobble.
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  #32  
Old 08-23-2019, 07:44 AM
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As far as measuring spin rate for tee shots, you could set up a camera above the disc just after release, e.g. from one of those DGPT structures. With high enough frame rate, measuring spin would be pretty easy.

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Old 08-23-2019, 10:34 AM
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Originally Posted by sidewinder22 View Post
Avery had this bar on the disc to measure spin rate and JR from DGR said it was 19.7 RPS or almost 1200 RPM on a 500' Teebird shot.

Probably the best advice I ever got from Avery was... "It is most important to lock your wrist when throwing, very little movement only slight wrist bend back and forth. Never pre-cock the wrist, trying to spin the disc is very different from throwing the disc. I grip the disc very firm and tight when throwing, you never want the disc to slip out early or any other time. Nice firm grip. Small amount of wrist extension. but at the right time."

How do you keep the hand on the outside of the disc if you dont cock the wrist? I certainly have to cock mine. Not that I'm actively opening it up during my throws.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:57 AM
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My flippant tone aside, point was and is that too many people are overthinking small elements of the throw. Things like "how much spin do I need on this shot" that make it more difficult than it ought to be to work out proper mechanics.

If your mechanics are sound, you're putting the right amount of spin on a throw.

Once you are there, sure, think about a little extra spin on a jumper around a tree or a little patent pending upshot. Until then, work on clean mechanics, get out of your head, and the rest mostly takes care of itself.

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Old 08-23-2019, 12:38 PM
DiscFifty DiscFifty is offline
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Originally Posted by wims View Post
How do you keep the hand on the outside of the disc if you dont cock the wrist? I certainly have to cock mine. Not that I'm actively opening it up during my throws.
Imop....cocking the wrist is a given, but exactly WHEN to cock is up for debate. My research has lead me to cock it full, right before the snap to get the "tendon bounce, sling shot, snap, whip, etc, etc" thingamagoob.
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  #36  
Old 08-23-2019, 12:41 PM
Hoosierhodge Hoosierhodge is offline
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I've thought about doing this and it would be a fun project for an engineering student. Design a test rig and/or software to measure lateral and rotational speed. My personal preference would use a high speed camera to capture data and write software to parse the results. We're doing more and more with high speed cameras to measure vibration on components in the field. Even a cell phone can measure 960 fps and the rest comes down to math & software programming. Otherwise a small accelerometer on a disc would be easy to implement but would likely affect flight and only be useful "in the lab".
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  #37  
Old 08-23-2019, 01:25 PM
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Didn't Westside launch a disc that could take a sensor a couple of years ago? The Destiny maybe?
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  #38  
Old 08-23-2019, 06:47 PM
cjman cjman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ODRB View Post
My flippant tone aside, point was and is that too many people are overthinking small elements of the throw. Things like "how much spin do I need on this shot" that make it more difficult than it ought to be to work out proper mechanics.

If your mechanics are sound, you're putting the right amount of spin on a throw.

Once you are there, sure, think about a little extra spin on a jumper around a tree or a little patent pending upshot. Until then, work on clean mechanics, get out of your head, and the rest mostly takes care of itself.
My mentor taught me to throw with reduced rpms when throwing understable discs into a headwind. There's more to this than simply "putting the right amount of spin on a throw". Disc can be simple, KISS, or you can get into the nitty gritty and learn discs and various throws.
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Old 08-23-2019, 07:18 PM
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R-Ogre R-Ogre is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjman View Post
My mentor taught me to throw with reduced rpms when throwing understable discs into a headwind. There's more to this than simply "putting the right amount of spin on a throw". Disc can be simple, KISS, or you can get into the nitty gritty and learn discs and various throws.
That seems bassackward. If you do the same throw headwind vs tailwind it seems that lower spin:speed ratio makes the disc more understable, which is opposite of what you want.

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  #40  
Old 08-23-2019, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wims View Post
How do you keep the hand on the outside of the disc if you dont cock the wrist? I certainly have to cock mine. Not that I'm actively opening it up during my throws.
Turn further back and swing from the Inside-Out.







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