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Old 09-09-2020, 09:06 PM
txmxer txmxer is offline
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Default Newb ? Beat in

I have some older discs that I inherited as my starter set. I have some newer discs that are less expensive/softer plastics that are a bit nicked up.

So, what do you mean when you say a disc is beat in? Seems that some use the term to describe a disc that has transitioned from stable to less stable in general--meaning the disc had a more stable flight when it was newer.

Is this the expectation for when a disc is beat in? How long does it take to properly beat in a disc? Say a premium plastic fairway driver? How much work do you expect to do with a disc before you will bag it for play (casual/rec/tournament?)
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Old 09-09-2020, 09:36 PM
DanJon DanJon is offline
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A "beat in" disc is one that no longer flies like its fresh counterpart.

Some discs beat in differently than others, but let's focus on the classics, like a DX or KC Roc.

Rocs have a lot of high speed stability, or resistance to turn when new.

As they beat in, they generally lose their low speed stability (or fade) first.

So when beat in, you can still throw them hard and they will fly straight without fading out or turning over too much.

Once they get really beat in, then you can move into turnover territory, where you see the nice RHBH slow right turning/finishing shot.

As for beating in premium plastic, that can take years depending on the manufacturer.

A star type plastic generally beats in faster than a champion type.

All of my discs have been in my bag for years, so I can't really answer the last question, but I have no issues with bagging a fresh OS mold since I know what I want it to do.

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Old 09-09-2020, 10:26 PM
oldmandiscer oldmandiscer is offline
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DanJon is correct.

I will add that some base/cheapest plastic can beat in on one single tree hit. More so if it's a wider rim like a distance driver. Though I have had plenty of base line putters taco and warp on a single tree (XT/DX/ProD/etc..). It's going to change the flight quickly.

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Old 09-09-2020, 10:49 PM
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dreadlock86 dreadlock86 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txmxer View Post
I have some older discs that I inherited as my starter set. I have some newer discs that are less expensive/softer plastics that are a bit nicked up.

So, what do you mean when you say a disc is beat in? Seems that some use the term to describe a disc that has transitioned from stable to less stable in general--meaning the disc had a more stable flight when it was newer.

Is this the expectation for when a disc is beat in? How long does it take to properly beat in a disc? Say a premium plastic fairway driver? How much work do you expect to do with a disc before you will bag it for play (casual/rec/tournament?)
you are correct.
but there is no specific time range. and a disc will progressively get less and less stable as it continues to beat in. obviously the more durable the plastic, the longer the process will take. DX, Pro, Star, Champ; increasingly durable in that order. not sure where Echo Star, Gstar, or some of the other more novel plastics fall on that spectrum.

different molds also beat in differently. the DX Roc example already given is a good one. some discs lose HSS first, some lose LSS first.

a disc doesn't need to be beaten in or owned long for me to bag it. so long as i know what it does and that it's a flight or shot that i need, i'm gonna bag it.



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Originally Posted by oldmandiscer View Post
I will add that some base/cheapest plastic can beat in on one single tree hit. More so if it's a wider rim like a distance driver.

this is possible but is also typically wildly exaggerated.
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Old 09-09-2020, 11:04 PM
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armiller armiller is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txmxer View Post
I have some older discs that I inherited as my starter set. I have some newer discs that are less expensive/softer plastics that are a bit nicked up.

So, what do you mean when you say a disc is beat in? Seems that some use the term to describe a disc that has transitioned from stable to less stable in general--meaning the disc had a more stable flight when it was newer.

Is this the expectation for when a disc is beat in? How long does it take to properly beat in a disc? Say a premium plastic fairway driver? How much work do you expect to do with a disc before you will bag it for play (casual/rec/tournament?)
First of all, there's no problem at all in playing with a fresh disc that is not beat in.

Personally, I have always preferred premium plastics and like to find discs that fly in a useful manner fresh off the shelf. In general, that means they start out a little bit overstable. However, as they do beat in during the course of normal use, you tend to grow with the disc. And you'll find that molds with some inherent overstability (Champion Teebird or even Firebird) are some of the most magical with use, though it takes years for them to get to that point. So, for me, I almost never buy a disc with the intention of working with it to make it worth bagging. In general, if I'm only throwing it to beat it up, I don't buy it.

And yes, being "beat in" generally means it loses high speed stability (gains turn) and loses low speed stability (loses fade). I hear rumors of discs that get more overstable with use, but I haven't seen it myself and am skeptical.

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Last edited by armiller; 09-09-2020 at 11:08 PM.
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Old 09-10-2020, 12:24 AM
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dreadlock86 dreadlock86 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armiller View Post
I hear rumors of discs that get more overstable with use, but I haven't seen it myself and am skeptical.
never heard of this but it is most certainly wrong
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Old 09-10-2020, 01:30 AM
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wolfhaley wolfhaley is offline
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^Agreed. How would that even be possible?
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Old 09-10-2020, 03:01 AM
txmxer txmxer is offline
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Thanks for the replies!
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Old 09-10-2020, 06:50 AM
oldmandiscer oldmandiscer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreadlock86 View Post
you are correct.
but there is no specific time range. and a disc will progressively get less and less stable as it continues to beat in. obviously the more durable the plastic, the longer the process will take. DX, Pro, Star, Champ; increasingly durable in that order. not sure where Echo Star, Gstar, or some of the other more novel plastics fall on that spectrum.

different molds also beat in differently. the DX Roc example already given is a good one. some discs lose HSS first, some lose LSS first.

a disc doesn't need to be beaten in or owned long for me to bag it. so long as i know what it does and that it's a flight or shot that i need, i'm gonna bag it.






this is possible but is also typically wildly exaggerated.
I should show you a picture (if I had it) after I hit first available with an XT Roc. It was in the shape of a taco. I had to bend it back. OK it wasn't completely folded in half, but it was approx. 10-20 degrees warped. That's where taco comes from.
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Old 09-10-2020, 07:24 AM
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mojorooks mojorooks is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txmxer View Post
I have some older discs that I inherited as my starter set. I have some newer discs that are less expensive/softer plastics that are a bit nicked up.

So, what do you mean when you say a disc is beat in? Seems that some use the term to describe a disc that has transitioned from stable to less stable in general--meaning the disc had a more stable flight when it was newer.

Is this the expectation for when a disc is beat in? How long does it take to properly beat in a disc? Say a premium plastic fairway driver? How much work do you expect to do with a disc before you will bag it for play (casual/rec/tournament?)
'Beat in' is just like it sounds. Beating the heck out of a disc aka tree bounces, scuffing on concrete etc. All discs start more stable and as they take abuse, become understable.

Some discs fly like they are supposed to right off the shelf, others don't.

I recently aquired and threw a Star Wraith, Valkyrie, roadrunner and a Gstar Mystere. The Wraith and Mystere flew like I expected them to but the Valk and roadrunner flew overstable which they are not so some beating in is needed. It seems to have a lot to do with the flashing on the inside of the rim. The wraith and Mystere have none while the valk and RR have it.

Different plastics have different rates at which they beat in. I recently stopped buying DX type plastics because my home course is heavily wooded and one pointblank tree bounce and the flight of the disc changes.

Hope this helps
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