#11  
Old 09-15-2020, 10:22 AM
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krupicka krupicka is offline
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The other option is to just embrace the water and play in a good pair of waterproof sandals.
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  #12  
Old 09-15-2020, 10:25 AM
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Old 09-15-2020, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krupicka View Post
The other option is to just embrace the water and play in a good pair of waterproof sandals.
You must be a fairway hitter. I’m a tree and thorn bush hitter. I do have wide duck-feet, but they’re not ogre-feet. But I practice in the backyard in sandals. And just so I don’t give the wrong impression about manliness, I also mow and weed-eat in sandals. But I can control the trimmer WAaaAY better than a disc.

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Old 09-15-2020, 10:40 AM
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Bring an extra pair of shoes and socks for your second round. Get used to the idea of playing your first round with wet shoes and socks. I did, doesn't bother me anymore. The right gear and some experience will make this easier. I have found that polyester socks and light no gortex/no waterproofing are the best kind of shoes for this. Waterproof shoes will just eventually get wet and not breathe or dry well, get hot and soaked/heavy with all the extra material.

I like regular trail running shoes, I use the Adidas Terrex without gortex, and any old poly socks you can buy anywhere.

I have Gortex Terrexes as well, but I don't bust those out until day temps get colder, like under 50. When it starts to get that cold we tend not to have as much morning dew and it's basically fall.

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Old 09-15-2020, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by seedlings View Post
Back when I used to ball golf, the shoes were waterproof so that I never remember this problem.
Go buy ball golf shoes without spikes. They make some pretty athletic ones nowadays.

Otherwise I recommend buying a shoe marketed as a "trail running" shoe; these -should- be waterproof up a significant part of the sidewall. You should be able to see visually exactly how far the waterproofing goes. If you see holes it isn't waterproof.

Last advice is to take higher steps. Dragging your feet will get your feet wet no matter what you wear.
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Old 09-15-2020, 11:17 AM
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We had 74 days of measurable precipitation where I live from June 1-August 31. You could say I’m experienced at playing in wet. Hiking shoes with a waterproof membrane help, better if they have a real leather outer that you can oil up to repel water. Best thing honestly is to put on good socks and just roll with it. And by good socks I don’t mean waterproof, you want to breathe, just something that wicks like wool.

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Old 09-15-2020, 11:25 AM
oldmandiscer oldmandiscer is offline
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Waterproof sandals? I think he meant water sandals. Being sandals it would be tough to make them waterproof.

Anyways, any lightweight hiking, trail runner with GoreTex could be good. I'm liking a pair of Merrel Moab's Goretex the best right now. I got probably 8 pairs of waterproof shoes and these are the best for dryness, durability and combination of lightness/mobility.

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Old 09-15-2020, 11:27 AM
oldmandiscer oldmandiscer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingus View Post
Go buy ball golf shoes without spikes. They make some pretty athletic ones nowadays.

Otherwise I recommend buying a shoe marketed as a "trail running" shoe; these -should- be waterproof up a significant part of the sidewall. You should be able to see visually exactly how far the waterproofing goes. If you see holes it isn't waterproof.

Last advice is to take higher steps. Dragging your feet will get your feet wet no matter what you wear.
I thought about that as well (spikeless golf shoes), however I was concerned about the durability on concrete and the traction as well.
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Old 09-15-2020, 11:27 AM
BillFleming BillFleming is offline
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I like the Merrill Glove shoes. They are the "barefoot/minimalist" type of shoe. I have the Move Glove version and wouldn't recommend it....it does keep my feet dry, but the stink afterwards is awful. The other versions have something else added to help kill the smell.
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  #20  
Old 09-15-2020, 11:31 AM
oldmandiscer oldmandiscer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Pacific View Post
Bring an extra pair of shoes and socks for your second round. Get used to the idea of playing your first round with wet shoes and socks. I did, doesn't bother me anymore. The right gear and some experience will make this easier. I have found that polyester socks and light no gortex/no waterproofing are the best kind of shoes for this. Waterproof shoes will just eventually get wet and not breathe or dry well, get hot and soaked/heavy with all the extra material.

I like regular trail running shoes, I use the Adidas Terrex without gortex, and any old poly socks you can buy anywhere.

I have Gortex Terrexes as well, but I don't bust those out until day temps get colder, like under 50. When it starts to get that cold we tend not to have as much morning dew and it's basically fall.
You can wash your waterproof shoes and they will regain most of the newness of waterproofing. I think that dirt and sweaty oils/whatever gets into the membrane or onto the shoe itself and it makes the membrane soak through much easier. The membrane doesn't work well if it's dirty.

Take the laces out, wash them on gentle cycle, the dry them in the sun. Oh and take the inserts out too to wash together but dry separately.

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