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Old 09-23-2019, 12:01 PM
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Alexplz Alexplz is offline
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Default Artificial Wear

OK so, being the impatient type, but also the type to prefer premium plastics in drivers, I am tempted to experiment with beating in some S and GFDs artificially.

I tried a DX Roc in the dryer at one point in time, did not seems to accomplish much. I used 0 heat and didn't add any rocks or old shoes - next time could try a little heat and maybe at least put a few discs in at once.

I have also been thinking about taking a Brillo pad to the surface of a disc to muss up the gloss and possibly aid in spoiling laminar flow. The way I understand it, it's not actually well agreed upon that it's the changing of the PLH through wear that reduces HSS - could also just be the hundreds of nicks and abrasions, or a combination thereof.

I have considered heating them in sub-boiling water and allowing them to cool, possibly just on a flat surface with no weight. The FDs I'm considering doing this to have heartbeat domes, and I suspect that re-heating and allowing them to cool more slowly could reduce their stability to where it would have been without unusual molding circumstances.

Finally, there's the old reliable technique of... well basically playing disc golf with them. Thumbers and wooded courses, in addition to allowing them to pan and skitter on the flight plate or just driving them into woody bushes etc.



What in your experience works the best to reduce the HSS of a disc quickly?
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  #2  
Old 09-23-2019, 12:25 PM
Siriusbomb Siriusbomb is offline
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I've taken mine on the course and thrown a bunch of forehand rollers with it alongside my round. It's a fun skill to practice and seems to age them nicely.

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Old 09-23-2019, 12:27 PM
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At one point I wanted to invest in an old school paint can shaker and a reel-to-reel film canister for beating in discs. I never realized my designs. Rollers or the side of a trash can will be your best bet.
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Old 09-23-2019, 12:31 PM
rakamkram rakamkram is offline
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Find a concrete wall, prop something up against it like a blanket to prevent the concrete from destroying the outside of the disc, and throw the disc against the padded concrete wall a couple dozen times

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Old 09-23-2019, 12:34 PM
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If there is any noticeable flashing on the disc, sand it off. Typically can be found at the parting line and/or the bottom of the disc (where the lower surface of the wing meets the inner rim). Great way to jump start the break in process, and also improves the hand feel imho.

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Old 09-23-2019, 12:37 PM
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I always found the best way to do this is simply to hold the disc in my hand and flex the rim up and down while rotating the disc while watching TV or something. It's a slow process, but I just do it for a bit each night, throw it the next time I am out and test the stability.

No chunking of the rim, no sanding. Just slowly mimic the process of the disc impacting something.

I don't really do this anymore, but I found it to be the most linear, easy to control way to do this.
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Old 09-23-2019, 12:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThrowBot View Post
If there is any noticeable flashing on the disc, sand it off. Typically can be found at the parting line and/or the bottom of the disc (where the lower surface of the wing meets the inner rim). Great way to jump start the break in process, and also improves the hand feel imho.
This is especially true on Trilogy stuff. Just getting rid of the under flashing adds a -1.

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Old 09-23-2019, 01:10 PM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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Yeah get rid of the plastic flashing on the bottom. Just push the disc around on smooth concrete in circles until it's smooth.

I also like putting a towel down on the sidewalk, and you can hammer motion or FH it into that towel a bunch of times while constantly rotating the disc to kind of bang up the nose even-ish without any chipping. If you want more natural markings then do a bunch of FH rollers to the next teepad every time you hole out. Over the course of a casual round, that will add up I'm sure.

Discs always seem to feel and fly better after they have been found in a water hazard after an extended time...I have no idea why. Has anyone tried just leaving discs in a water bucket in their yard for a week or more? It sounds crazy but I definitely notice retrieved discs often feel great.

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Old 09-23-2019, 01:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post

Discs always seem to feel and fly better after they have been found in a water hazard after an extended time...I have no idea why. Has anyone tried just leaving discs in a water bucket in their yard for a week or more? It sounds crazy but I definitely notice retrieved discs often feel great.
No, no, no. They get too comfy in there, and then start seeking out water.

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Old 09-23-2019, 02:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post
Discs always seem to feel and fly better after they have been found in a water hazard after an extended time...I have no idea why. Has anyone tried just leaving discs in a water bucket in their yard for a week or more? It sounds crazy but I definitely notice retrieved discs often feel great.
I remember pulling some old champ discs out of the lake at Wakanda Park and thinking they felt great. They seemed a little more gummy than typical champ, more grip and a slight bit of extra flex.

Never went as far as deliberately aging discs in water, but it's not the craziest idea I've heard!
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