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Old 06-28-2019, 05:39 PM
Billipo Billipo is offline
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Default Level Tee pads

Question - What is an acceptable slope on a tee pad (front to back).

Should all tee pads be all made level (minimal slope for drainage) or should they follow the lay of the land? This is assuming the tees area is fairly level.

Interested in thoughts.
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Old 06-28-2019, 05:47 PM
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Tee pads should be level, with allowance for drainage. PDGA guidance states:

Quote:
Tee areas should be level from left to right. They should not slope too sharply from front to back. . . . Beyond the front of each tee pad and either side should be adequate room for follow-thru so a player doesn't risk twisting an ankle, falling off a ledge or whacking their arm on a tree or sign. If possible, provide adequate level ground for a run-up behind each tee pad, especially on longer holes.
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Old 06-28-2019, 05:57 PM
Billipo Billipo is offline
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Really trying to understand what is considered "too sharply".


I don't think that I will have an issue, but just trying be complaint as I give reasonable direction to the park for the individuals pouring who don't play the sport.

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Old 06-28-2019, 06:09 PM
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When the grade goes downhill, I would suggest always making the tees level. When the tee is on a slope aiming uphill I think players are okay with some uphill slope to the pad, especially since installing the pad fully level might mean cutting into the hill too much so you end up with mud draining onto the front of the pad over time.

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Old 06-28-2019, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Cgkdisc View Post
When the grade goes downhill, I would suggest always making the tees level. When the tee is on a slope aiming uphill I think players are okay with some uphill slope to the pad, especially since installing the pad fully level might mean cutting into the hill too much so you end up with mud draining onto the front of the pad over time.
Just out of curiosity, has there ever been discussion on intentionally sloping pads to the L or R for added difficulty in championship level play? An entire course of this would be silly, and it would have to be a gentle slope for injury prevention, but I think it could be a feature on a hole or two to add an extra layer of challenge.

We all know how throwing off of side slopes affects the throw...
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Old 06-28-2019, 06:26 PM
Steve West Steve West is offline
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If the highest corner of the tee pad will be no more than 1 or 2 (maybe 3) inches higher than the lowest corner, I like to follow the lay of the land to make the tee pad just proud of flush on all sides.

The advantage of following the lay of the land is that you don't get buried corners where the ground is higher or step-ups to get on the pad where the ground is lower.

This will not come naturally to most pourers, they're trained to make it level.

You would think you could dig a flat spot around the pad so the pad was level AND flush, but gravity and rain will move the high side back down onto the tee pad. Unless you use a properly installed retaining wall.
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Old 06-28-2019, 07:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brutalbrutus View Post
Just out of curiosity, has there ever been discussion on intentionally sloping pads to the L or R for added difficulty in championship level play? An entire course of this would be silly, and it would have to be a gentle slope for injury prevention, but I think it could be a feature on a hole or two to add an extra layer of challenge.

We all know how throwing off of side slopes affects the throw...
No public discussion among designers that I'm aware of to intentionally slope the pads. It's enough of a challenge when the tees are natural and rutted, class 5 that needs repacking or rubber mats where the base has gotten contoured or was never smoothed out to begin with. The oddest level pads I've seen are on the Blue Valley course where the pads were poured to match the shape of each hole. Good thing there are no U-shaped doglegs.

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Old 06-28-2019, 07:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve West View Post
If the highest corner of the tee pad will be no more than 1 or 2 (maybe 3) inches higher than the lowest corner, I like to follow the lay of the land to make the tee pad just proud of flush on all sides.

The advantage of following the lay of the land is that you don't get buried corners where the ground is higher or step-ups to get on the pad where the ground is lower.

This will not come naturally to most pourers, they're trained to make it level.

You would think you could dig a flat spot around the pad so the pad was level AND flush, but gravity and rain will move the high side back down onto the tee pad. Unless you use a properly installed retaining wall.
So - maximum angle of 1.8 degrees from flat? That's calculated for an 8' pad, directly along a long edge, as opposed to corner to corner. If you mean up to 3 inches to opposing corners - maxing out at 1.7 degrees for an 8x4 pad. I feel like, anecdotally, I would be accepting of more than those limits as a player.
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Old 06-28-2019, 08:59 PM
Casey 1988 Casey 1988 is offline
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I have seen some Tee pads from a Disc golf course that they followed the land rather then make them level so one hole players had to play at a 20 degree angle. This was an course in California, a newer course that too the design rules literally and person who designed them thought the hole tee pad had to be made level to the ground so they went to the ground not to the player.

Worst have seen that was not natural or Asphalt in the case of all but one of the old pads at Tuthill park that were falling apart only a few years after the course was made were some of the ones on the Omaha course in Rapid City that had Quickcrete on top of some of the really worn/cracking concrete tee pad and they did not smooth out properly the Quickcreate was a tad lumpy, but smooth enough to play on. Now (have not seen it ) the Omaha course has new Tee pads I think? or the local club fixed the old tepads with Quickcreate correctly but has new baskets replacing the home made rebar for sure, the new baskets were old modern bottom catcher Mach III from the nearby Jackson course that got Mach V. I thought that the local Club was going to put the old Chainstar baskets on the Omaha course but I forgot those became club baskets for temporary courses.

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Old 07-10-2019, 06:18 PM
curmudgeonDwindle curmudgeonDwindle is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brutalbrutus View Post
Just out of curiosity, has there ever been discussion on intentionally sloping pads to the L or R for added difficulty in championship level play? An entire course of this would be silly, and it would have to be a gentle slope for injury prevention, but I think it could be a feature on a hole or two to add an extra layer of challenge.

We all know how throwing off of side slopes affects the throw...
For the OP: 2% grade is the rule of thumb for 'flat' drainage.

The idea of a 'tee pad', aside from having a designated place to start a hole, is that a tee-pad is the only place on the course where the designer gives the player the 'best lie' possible. Why? Because it is the only place where players are given the chance to execute the 'perfect' shot. Good tees reinforce the episodic 're-set' nature of the game - one looks forward (or takes for granted) a 'good' lie is coming (almost like levels in video games). Personally, as a player whose game was initially built on scrambling, this anticipation was sometimes a great relief...

This is an old idea and I don't know whether this understanding is an 'intuitive' one or a learned expectation, but judging by the amount of emphasis on tee-pads (2nd most used area of any course) and their quality, I believe it a fair one.

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