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Old 11-23-2020, 02:05 PM
RoDeO RoDeO is offline
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Let me know what I can improve on. Any advice welcome. I'm averaging around 350 right now with my max around 380. Been playing 5 months.

https://youtu.be/F0tA2GW8JHo
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Old 11-23-2020, 02:27 PM
bsammons bsammons is offline
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It may be tricky with the positioning of the net, but views from the front are a little easier to see the majority of the mechanics of someone’s throw - not complaining just giving a bit of advice.

It looks like you have decent power but you aren’t leveraging your body with your brace. The momentum you built up is sliding through, but your brace is just directing the momentum, not adding power if that makes sense. With a proper brace, if the leg suddenly disappears the thrower would fall on his behind - if your brace were to disappear you would fall forward, facing the target and face/stomach first.

That’s the biggest thing from that angle, but from another angle it might be easier to see what your arm/shoulder/foot positioning/release look like.
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Old 11-23-2020, 03:27 PM
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seedlings seedlings is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsammons View Post
It may be tricky with the positioning of the net, but views from the front are a little easier to see the majority of the mechanics of someone’s throw - not complaining just giving a bit of advice.

It looks like you have decent power but you aren’t leveraging your body with your brace. The momentum you built up is sliding through, but your brace is just directing the momentum, not adding power if that makes sense. With a proper brace, if the leg suddenly disappears the thrower would fall on his behind - if your brace were to disappear you would fall forward, facing the target and face/stomach first.

That’s the biggest thing from that angle, but from another angle it might be easier to see what your arm/shoulder/foot positioning/release look like.
Yes. This video was directed at someone else, but the information will be helpful to describe proper hip positioning:

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Old 11-23-2020, 03:34 PM
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Editing fail. Also this:

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Old 11-23-2020, 03:52 PM
UhhNegative UhhNegative is offline
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From my post on the other thread, my take:

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Originally Posted by UhhNegative View Post
Little hard to see here but Paul at toes down vs Rodeo at toes down:





Easier to see in motion but Paul's rear heel is moving targetward and Rodeo's is spinning in place. And Paul's disc hasn't really started moving forward yet while Rodeo's has started moving a solid 10+ frames earlier.
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Old 11-23-2020, 05:26 PM
twistedraven twistedraven is offline
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First and foremost, you want to stop x-stepping backwards. Take a waaay smaller x-step, this will help with keeping the x-step foot more perpendicular to your line, which will allow you to shift your hips smoothly as you follow though, instead of torqueing your upper body around from being backwards too early. This isn't necessarily about power either, it's bout being accurate on the course. You shouldn't be looking away from your target for the majority of your throw.

Also, take a video from your front, not back.

Last edited by twistedraven; 11-23-2020 at 05:30 PM.
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Old 11-23-2020, 05:52 PM
UhhNegative UhhNegative is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedraven View Post
First and foremost, you want to stop x-stepping backwards. Take a waaay smaller x-step, this will help with keeping the x-step foot more perpendicular to your line, which will allow you to shift your hips smoothly as you follow though, instead of torqueing your upper body around from being backwards too early. This isn't necessarily about power either, it's bout being accurate on the course. You shouldn't be looking away from your target for the majority of your throw.

Also, take a video from your front, not back.
I feel like this is the number 1 thing I see among all throwers. Everyone wants to do the backswing too early at first.
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Old 11-23-2020, 10:12 PM
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ChrisWoj ChrisWoj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedraven View Post
First and foremost, you want to stop x-stepping backwards. Take a waaay smaller x-step, this will help with keeping the x-step foot more perpendicular to your line, which will allow you to shift your hips smoothly as you follow though, instead of torqueing your upper body around from being backwards too early. This isn't necessarily about power either, it's bout being accurate on the course. You shouldn't be looking away from your target for the majority of your throw.

Also, take a video from your front, not back.
This is in line with what I was telling him in the thread this discussion began in. He's so far backward that, basically, his hips are completely done with their pulling action before he gets into moving through the lower back. His plant foot comes down and sets short of the appropriate angle. The hips complete their work. And only then does he begin to pull through with the lower back (hence the lower back soreness he's mentioned in the other thread). And then what he sees as continued hip movement is the hips being pulled along by the upper body overtaking them and dragging them along for the ride.

In the video he posted above in this thread it isn't so bad, but it it's still there as evidenced by the lead foot still being behind the action. If many of his throws are like the other video he posted in the other thread - that's why the back pain occurs. He's clearly making progress if he can do what he's doing in this video.

RoDeO - how many of your throws are more like the original slo-mo posted in the other thread, and how many are more like this one?
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Old 11-23-2020, 10:54 PM
RoDeO RoDeO is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWoj View Post
This is in line with what I was telling him in the thread this discussion began in. He's so far backward that, basically, his hips are completely done with their pulling action before he gets into moving through the lower back. His plant foot comes down and sets short of the appropriate angle. The hips complete their work. And only then does he begin to pull through with the lower back (hence the lower back soreness he's mentioned in the other thread). And then what he sees as continued hip movement is the hips being pulled along by the upper body overtaking them and dragging them along for the ride.

In the video he posted above in this thread it isn't so bad, but it it's still there as evidenced by the lead foot still being behind the action. If many of his throws are like the other video he posted in the other thread - that's why the back pain occurs. He's clearly making progress if he can do what he's doing in this video.

RoDeO - how many of your throws are more like the original slo-mo posted in the other thread, and how many are more like this one?
Most of my throws are like the one I posted in this thread. Just to be clear about the back- it gets tired, not sore. Sorry if I was painting a picture of soreness. I throw a lot. Probably around two hundred on average a day. I'm 47 years old and I think between the quantity of throws and my age my back gets tired. I am in excellent health though.
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Old 11-23-2020, 11:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoDeO View Post
Most of my throws are like the one I posted in this thread. Just to be clear about the back- it gets tired, not sore. Sorry if I was painting a picture of soreness. I throw a lot. Probably around two hundred on average a day. I'm 47 years old and I think between the quantity of throws and my age my back gets tired. I am in excellent health though.
Tired. Sore. Either way - that should be coming from the upper legs and glutes, not the back. You should feel tired below the hips, not above them.
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