#1  
Old 12-01-2020, 04:08 PM
KUSwaff KUSwaff is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 1
Niced 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Ball Golf/Disc Golf Correlation

I'm currently re-learning to throw after a decade or so layoff from the game. I learned after a few years of trial and error playing ball golf, that all that matters is how the club comes into the ball at impact, and the 18 or so inches post impact. There are endless ways to get there, but if you look at any tour pro, that 2-3 foot impact window looks identical.

Is the same true in disc golf? Is all that matters is the disc gets to center chest with the hand on the outside (9:00 position), elbow up and pointing forward, ready to drive (facing 12:00), and the arm extends to about 10:00 for release, with the hand moving from 9:00 to 3:00 around the disc?

If that's really all there is, then I need to completely start over, just working on that (Beato drill), and very slowly and gradually adding more momentum to that action (brace, hips, x-step).

I want to start playing in tournaments in the spring. Is this the thing to focus on?
Sponsored Links
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-01-2020, 04:23 PM
DiscFifty DiscFifty is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Years Playing: 9.8
Courses Played: 20
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 4,533
Niced 1,829 Times in 1,015 Posts
Default

Expect a flood of responses. But I would suggest just learning to throw a putter straight, level, about 6ft high. With distance goals of 100,150,200,250+.

Niced: (3)
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-01-2020, 06:51 PM
zontar zontar is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: lincoln ne
Courses Played: 53
Posts: 918
Niced 485 Times in 299 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiscFifty View Post
Expect a flood of responses. But I would suggest just learning to throw a putter straight, level, about 6ft high. With distance goals of 100,150,200,250+.
this. then a midrange. all you need to know!

Niced: (2)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-01-2020, 11:52 PM
Dingus Dingus is online now
Birdie Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Courses Played: 2
Posts: 475
Niced 371 Times in 176 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KUSwaff View Post
Is the same true in disc golf?
I would say no. Ball golf is much *easier* to *do* because as you said, all you have to do is make the simple machine hit the ball in the correct spot/plane. Of course the simple machine can be extremely finicky at its work, so the results can be catastrophic where as in disc golf a catastrophic result is rare.

To the heart of your question, if you want to get *good* fast, you need to learn how to convert on birdie or bust holes. That means accuracy under 300', and a high putting percentage. On a ball golf course your scoring opportunities are usually par 4's. Your real ability to score is dependent on your short irons and wedges and how well you can capitalize off a good drive, one-putting on the green. The same applies to disc golf, but in disc golf the wedge shot happens from the tee box. You need to be able to nail every ~200' hole with a putter drive, and most ~280' holes with a mid. And then you need to convert over half of your C1X putts.

If I were in your position I would focus on throwing straight, range accurate shots with a driving putter and a mid, maybe a fairway driver. I would spend half my time putting. I would leave wide rim drivers out of your bag, and approach any hole over ~350' as a layup or at the best a bonus hole.

Niced: (1)
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-02-2020, 09:44 AM
ru4por's Avatar
ru4por ru4por is online now
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Dearborn Michigan
Years Playing: 37.7
Courses Played: 250
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 5,496
Niced 5,095 Times in 1,747 Posts
Default

Sigh. Seems like the site is currently filled with technique threads, filled with absolutes. No doubt this will turn out the same. No, golf is not just about the ball strike. Like any sport/game, reproduction is key. Solid form not only allows for reproduction, it allows for a safe swing, easier distance and more dependable results. If simply striking the ball was all that was needed, any reasonably athletic schmuck, with a touch of eye/hand coordination, would be Tiger Woods.

There are no shortcuts. Practice. Make use of some of the older technique threads on here. There are some terrific drills that help breakdown the elements of the disc golf swing. Most aim to assist in building a solid, reproducible, dependable throw.

Want the real secret??

It ain't distance. Become the best putter in your area. You will be very pleased with your tournament results.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-14-2020, 05:04 AM
nomadic's Avatar
nomadic nomadic is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: SE Asia
Posts: 39
Niced 16 Times in 13 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingus View Post
I would say no. Ball golf is much *easier* to *do* because as you said, all you have to do is make the simple machine hit the ball in the correct spot/plane. Of course the simple machine can be extremely finicky at its work, so the results can be catastrophic where as in disc golf a catastrophic result is rare.

To the heart of your question, if you want to get *good* fast, you need to learn how to convert on birdie or bust holes. That means accuracy under 300', and a high putting percentage. On a ball golf course your scoring opportunities are usually par 4's. Your real ability to score is dependent on your short irons and wedges and how well you can capitalize off a good drive, one-putting on the green. The same applies to disc golf, but in disc golf the wedge shot happens from the tee box. You need to be able to nail every ~200' hole with a putter drive, and most ~280' holes with a mid. And then you need to convert over half of your C1X putts.

If I were in your position I would focus on throwing straight, range accurate shots with a driving putter and a mid, maybe a fairway driver. I would spend half my time putting. I would leave wide rim drivers out of your bag, and approach any hole over ~350' as a layup or at the best a bonus hole.
This is an interesting and well-articulated take. I see a lot of wisdom in what you've said.

I'm trying to reconcile this with my belief that the best time to develop your max distance potential is as early as possible. That is, build a canon as early as possible and then learn to shoot it, to grow that birdie or bust range.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-14-2020, 12:01 PM
BillFleming BillFleming is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Arizona
Years Playing: 2
Courses Played: 7
Throwing Style: RHFH
Posts: 593
Niced 362 Times in 216 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nomadic View Post
This is an interesting and well-articulated take. I see a lot of wisdom in what you've said.

I'm trying to reconcile this with my belief that the best time to develop your max distance potential is as early as possible. That is, build a canon as early as possible and then learn to shoot it, to grow that birdie or bust range.
That seems to be the way it should be.....but, going for the max/best right away is really the wrong thing to do in any sport - and practically anything.

Let's say you want to be a runner. Do you immediately go out and run a full marathon? No, you work your way up to it....you need time to develop the correct form and ability.

The same with disc golf - although this is a hard truth to accept - start with perfecting your form and then distance will begin to happen.

And to use your cannon example...you still need to start small. If you just go out and build a cannon with no experience...that cannon will probably blow up on you the first time you try it. You need to learn how to forge the metal and mold the cannon. Then you need to learn how to mix the ingredients to make the gunpowder. It's all one step at a time.
Reply With Quote
 

  #8  
Old 12-14-2020, 06:05 PM
txmxer txmxer is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Texas
Years Playing: 0.9
Courses Played: 4
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 715
Niced 569 Times in 279 Posts
Default

You cannot develop a cannon without good technique.

Like BG, DG has a lot of strategy to be successful. To be able to use strategy, you need to be confident/knowledgeable what you can and cannot do and be consistent in what you can do. This requires repetition.

You want to be able to throw specific lines--straight low or high, straight to right or straight to left at 100-200', etc.

Being able to fling a disc 500' in a random direction won't make you accurate. Accuracy is premier.

Niced: (1)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Disc Golf on ball golf courses managed by American Golf Whirlwind Disc Golf Disc Golf Courses 31 09-08-2019 01:58 PM
Disc Golf on Ball Golf Courses - Master List klay General Disc Golf Chat 43 09-26-2014 02:10 PM
Interesting News video Ball golf vs Disc golf Bamm General Disc Golf Chat 26 08-03-2013 02:15 PM
The amount of money I'll save if I give up ball golf for disc golf. toddy74 General Disc Golf Chat 38 10-25-2012 08:15 AM
Ball Golf Courses that turn into Disc Golf Course for half the day? sportfan187 Disc Golf Courses 8 06-02-2009 12:48 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.