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Old 11-28-2018, 01:48 PM
Dingus Dingus is offline
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Default Disc "Swing" Weight

Random thought I had on disc weight. Is there an equivalent for ball golf swing weight?

The concept of swing weight is how heavy the club feels to swing. Longer shafts make a clubhead feel heavier, while weighted grips do the opposite.

When comparing drivers to mids, does the swing weight have any impact? I traditionally buy 180g Rocs and 175g Teebirds. Would changing those Rocs down to 170g make any difference at all in release? According to my feeble maths, the Roc has a 3% diameter bump from a teebird, which would make a 170g Roc "swing" as heavy as a 175g teebird.

Of course I am not considering changes in flight due to the weight difference, just release mechanics.
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Old 11-28-2018, 02:22 PM
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Monocacy Monocacy is offline
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No math but I find that the following weights "feel" similar when thrown:

157 Drivers
166 Midranges
173 Putters
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Old 11-28-2018, 02:32 PM
Dingus Dingus is offline
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Originally Posted by Monocacy View Post
No math but I find that the following weights "feel" similar when thrown:

157 Drivers
166 Midranges
173 Putters
Which is weird because the mids are wider so maybe I'm completely wrong.

I just realized that measuring outside diameter wouldn't work, it would be inside because we hang onto the inside rim. So a roc with 1.3 cm rim would be 20.4 cm inside to outside, and a teebird 19.5. So in actuality it would be over 4% difference in diameter. That doesn't even account for the counter weighting of the rim you are holding onto...
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Old 11-28-2018, 02:42 PM
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I understand what you're saying, but I don't think there's a DG equivalent. Maybe a pro could tell differences in weight along the rim vs more in the center (which is what wold create that swing weight differential), but I doubt most of us really can.
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Old 11-28-2018, 02:44 PM
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JuanA JuanA is offline
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But are we actually feeling the "swing" of a disc, or is the total weight what we feel in the drive?
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Old 11-28-2018, 02:46 PM
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The weight distribution along the radius of the disc would determine how "heavy" it feels to "swing".

More mass distributed near the outside/rim make it feel "heavier" (in technical terms: higher mass moment of inertia).

This is the principle that MVP/Axiom discs achieve by using denser material in the disc rim and less dense material in the flight plate. (GYRO technology.) Similar story for the Wizard, which purportedly has a flight plate that is thicker near the rim and thinner in the middle.

Now, as far as feel in the hand during the throw, that's a very personal matter that relates to your throwing mechanics in many ways. Also remember that you are accelerating the disc forward in the linear sense, in addition to spinning it, so there are many ways that you may feel the discs inertia (weight) during the throw. But once you release the disc, the effects of MMoI and angular momentum are very straightforward.

The higher a disc's Mass Moment of Inertia (or "swing weight"), the more angular momentum it will have at any given rotational speed. When a disc is flying, angular momentum makes it 'stable' -- which is to say, resistant to both High Speed Turn and Low Speed Fade.
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Old 11-28-2018, 03:09 PM
Dingus Dingus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuanA View Post
But are we actually feeling the "swing" of a disc, or is the total weight what we feel in the drive?
Kinda my thought. If we are throwing it like a hammer, then yes, we would feel the swing. But if not, if we are getting it up to speed completely linearly it wouldn't matter.

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The weight distribution along the radius of the disc would determine how "heavy" it feels to "swing".

More mass distributed near the outside/rim make it feel "heavier" (in technical terms: higher mass moment of inertia).
I did think about this but there is no easy way to quantify this in my head, so I stuck with diameter being an easily quantifiable concept. But yes, the actual position of the mass would be necessary to determine precise swing weight.

Assuming we could quantify this mass positioning and determine the proper adjustment to disc weight to achieve similar swing weights, do you think it would make for more repeatable form?

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Old 11-28-2018, 03:32 PM
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No math here, but I feel like speed 9ish stuff for me can have the most rim-weighted feel and be the most "slingy" when I throw it. Like a Roadrunner for example. Something with a narrow-ish and blunt enough wing shape that the wing is pretty dense, and tall enough that it's also pretty dense. When the rim gets wider and sharper then they feel more spread out/balanced to me. And smaller rimmed discs like putters and mids aren't quite as wing weight heavy it seems. Again, all by feel.

But super OS discs can seem the most "heavy" and like they want to rip your fingers off when you release them, like a FAF Firebird or NukeOS or something. But I don't know how much of that is just your expectations being obliterated while the disc goes left the second it leaves your hand.
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Old 11-28-2018, 04:05 PM
pjhayes7 pjhayes7 is offline
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I believe you are thinking way to much about this. The difference in diameter between the smallest and largest disc is minuscule compared to the length difference between a wedge and a driver. Also, the mass concentrated in a club head is a significantly higher percentage of the total weight than the outside edge of a disc is to its total weight. And in changing the weight of a disc, the distribution of that weight will stay pretty much the same, which is definitely not the case in changing the weight in a golf club. And finally, the distance you swing the majority of weight of a club from your body also contributes to the swing weight. Long story, there is no swing weight difference in discs that is noticeable to humans.

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Old 11-28-2018, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by pjhayes7 View Post
I believe you are thinking way to much about this. The difference in diameter between the smallest and largest disc is minuscule compared to the length difference between a wedge and a driver. Also, the mass concentrated in a club head is a significantly higher percentage of the total weight than the outside edge of a disc is to its total weight. And in changing the weight of a disc, the distribution of that weight will stay pretty much the same, which is definitely not the case in changing the weight in a golf club. And finally, the distance you swing the majority of weight of a club from your body also contributes to the swing weight. Long story, there is no swing weight difference in discs that is noticeable to humans.
I have to disagree with you. Now this is based on some VERY quick internet research, but here goes...

5 iron
38.25" shaft
254g

9 iron
36.25" shaft
282g

That means the 9 iron shaft is just over 5% shorter, and the head weight about 11% more to compensate. In my example of Roc-Teebird, we are talking about over 4% length difference. So no, the difference between the smallest and widest disc is far from minuscule compared to golf club lengths.
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