#441  
Old 10-22-2019, 03:45 PM
deyo7 deyo7 is offline
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Originally Posted by UhhNegative View Post
Interesting, it seems like how Dunipace is describing it is how I think about it. It just seems counter to seeing Eagle and other players putting the thumb more towards the center. I can't imagine how I would be able to grip the disc hard and allow it to pivot with the thumb that far inside. It must be moving back towards the rim at release or something.

Also my favorite video of Dunipace is him casually hitting two standstill 50' putts in a row. Never knew he had that level of skill.
Give yourself a fan grip then try Eagle's thumb in middle of disc. You'll feel massive leverage but I think the tricky party is keeping it nose down. Bigger hands probably help too.
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  #442  
Old 10-22-2019, 07:59 PM
UhhNegative UhhNegative is offline
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Grip is such a tough topic. When itīs warm outside I would reply that pretty much any grip will do, now that itīs cold all grips suck . I personally know a lot of professional disc golfers who can crush the disc over 550+ and they have almost nothing in common with their grips. SW22 is probably going to chime in soon and suggest robbies two finger grip which never really clicked on me.

Mainly we grip things with our fingers clamping against our thumb muscle and thatīs how I am trying to grip the disc atleast in the winter. Pretty much every single "finger-grip" kills my fingers during the cold seasons.
I think the the right question to ask would be what we are trying to achive with the grip, what is the right task? I donīt have an answer to that. That would be an intresting topic to discuss.
Do you mean like fingers clamping against the big thumb muscle? Like the pad? If so, my whole life is a lie. I'm mainly gripping with more of the thumbprint and index finger under the rim. The disc is still contacting my palm, but I'm not really applying pressure with it. I'm going to have to try this out. I know the "rip point" will still be my thumbprint and index finger.
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  #443  
Old 10-23-2019, 12:57 AM
RandyC RandyC is offline
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Originally Posted by UhhNegative View Post
Do you mean like fingers clamping against the big thumb muscle? Like the pad? If so, my whole life is a lie. I'm mainly gripping with more of the thumbprint and index finger under the rim. The disc is still contacting my palm, but I'm not really applying pressure with it. I'm going to have to try this out. I know the "rip point" will still be my thumbprint and index finger.
I have pretty small hands, I think my rip point is more my 1st index joint on the rim and the tip of my thumb slightly lifted up, so itīs the bony part at the joint. Also when the thumb is slightly lifted you should see your thumb muscle engaged. The grip itself feels very relaxed and I belive itīs just because most of it comes from the thumb muscle. Like if I were to use the disc as a hand fan it is definently pinky,ring,middle and meat of the thumb that is controlling the movement.

Hope that makes some sense.
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  #444  
Old 10-23-2019, 11:44 AM
UhhNegative UhhNegative is offline
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Originally Posted by RandyC View Post
I have pretty small hands, I think my rip point is more my 1st index joint on the rim and the tip of my thumb slightly lifted up, so itīs the bony part at the joint. Also when the thumb is slightly lifted you should see your thumb muscle engaged. The grip itself feels very relaxed and I belive itīs just because most of it comes from the thumb muscle. Like if I were to use the disc as a hand fan it is definently pinky,ring,middle and meat of the thumb that is controlling the movement.

Hope that makes some sense.
Yeah that makes sense and my rip point is the same. Not the tip of the thumb but more around the first (outer) thumb joint. So you are saying that you are gripping with the fingers/thumb pad but then having the index finger/thumb as the rip point? I think I'm doing basically everything with just the rip point and not really applying much pressure at the palm/fingers interface.
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  #445  
Old 10-23-2019, 12:32 PM
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sidewinder22 sidewinder22 is offline
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If you use Bratten’s 2 finger grip and lift the tip of your thumb up then the base of the thumb should be holding the pressure on the top, and you should be able to take the index finger off the rim as well and basically hold the disc between the middle finger and base of the thumb. Need to find the right disc angle in your hand for this control.
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  #446  
Old 10-31-2019, 04:14 PM
UhhNegative UhhNegative is offline
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Real talk: Had my first mental breakdown in a round in quite some time. Made some stupid mistakes (like playing for the wrong pin location a few times...) and took an epic quad bogey on my least favorite hole/pin location in existence. By the 9th hole, I wasn't engaged with playing anymore and just played to get it over with. Ended up last in tags (not terribly unusual) and inside I was fuming. Once I hit that "point of no return" in a round, there's just no coming back from it. But I think I handled it a lot better than I have in the past and got over it more quickly than before which is a good sign. Before, something like that would ruin my entire day.

It's just incredibly frustrating to practice putting and then it all doesn't matter when my mental state gets so perturbed during the round. I tend to self-preserve by not really practicing as much as I should so that when I inevitably fail then I can't "fully" label myself as a failure. Or I stop trying during the round. But then I just end up held in place because I'm too afraid to put my full faith effort into getting better and still fail. My monkey brain deems that to be the worst-case scenario. In my early 20s I could go all-out for things because I hadn't really met utter failure yet. Then I went through some things and really was in a bad place mentally. I'm a lot better now, but my internal demons do still come out from time-to-time. Part of my pursuit of disc golf is to develop a stronger mental game in life and be able to try harder even in the face of failure.
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  #447  
Old 10-31-2019, 10:22 PM
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sidewinder22 sidewinder22 is offline
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Do you always practice with a stack of discs?

Always good stuff in here:
https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forum...d.php?t=134975
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  #448  
Old 11-01-2019, 02:10 PM
RandyC RandyC is offline
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Hmm, I think you have one of those putting styles that are made in a sense that it probably did not come naturally ? I would suggest switching hands and see what sort of putting style your body comes up, my guess is, it will be some sort of spinish putt. Thou I think you switched hands once already ?

I practiced putting with my left hand and it made me lose all the "feldberg" moves from my actual putt. I just went with what came naturally and now I donīt have to think about how to putt. Sure I still miss putts but they donīt feel as stressful as before, now I donīt seek something in my form to blame. Be like MJ, missed putt, "oh well" and nail the second one.
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  #449  
Old 11-01-2019, 07:59 PM
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HyzerUniBomber HyzerUniBomber is offline
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I think that you could see some improvement by developing some inner strength around your own self worth. It may be working with some less fortunate or being a big brother to little kid. It may be as simple as just calling a friend once a week and asking how they’re doing. It sounds like the negativity of your internal dialogue is overwhelming your ability to recognize that you are a good person.

Missing a putt or losing a game does not have ONE LICK of correlation about your own self worth. If you never make another putt inside the circle, for the rest of your life, you can still be an absolutely awesome person. That negative inner voice needs a reckoning with the good person that you are, and then a missed putt can be just a part of your awesome time on the course.
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  #450  
Old 11-01-2019, 08:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UhhNegative View Post
Real talk: Had my first mental breakdown in a round in quite some time. Made some stupid mistakes (like playing for the wrong pin location a few times...) and took an epic quad bogey on my least favorite hole/pin location in existence. By the 9th hole, I wasn't engaged with playing anymore and just played to get it over with. Ended up last in tags (not terribly unusual) and inside I was fuming. Once I hit that "point of no return" in a round, there's just no coming back from it. But I think I handled it a lot better than I have in the past and got over it more quickly than before which is a good sign. Before, something like that would ruin my entire day.

It's just incredibly frustrating to practice putting and then it all doesn't matter when my mental state gets so perturbed during the round. I tend to self-preserve by not really practicing as much as I should so that when I inevitably fail then I can't "fully" label myself as a failure. Or I stop trying during the round. But then I just end up held in place because I'm too afraid to put my full faith effort into getting better and still fail. My monkey brain deems that to be the worst-case scenario. In my early 20s I could go all-out for things because I hadn't really met utter failure yet. Then I went through some things and really was in a bad place mentally. I'm a lot better now, but my internal demons do still come out from time-to-time. Part of my pursuit of disc golf is to develop a stronger mental game in life and be able to try harder even in the face of failure.
I played the wrong pin on a course I helped with at age 17 in 2006, I was carrying the basket for the most part but did help with a few holes. The reason I played to the wrong holes was that when the small/short tee pads got put in during 2013 the city people put the taper end in the back part of the tee pad not the other way even though it was told to them Skinny end of the molds furthest from the basket so skinny part is at the end to throw from.
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