#101  
Old 09-15-2020, 08:42 PM
scooby snack scooby snack is offline
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Originally Posted by RoDeO View Post
In baseball the rotation happens before front foot plant. That was my point.
In dg, opening your hips before you plant would cause a loss of power.
The hips move laterally during weight shift, then rotation occurs on the brace.
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  #102  
Old 09-15-2020, 10:53 PM
RoDeO RoDeO is online now
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Originally Posted by scooby snack View Post
In dg, opening your hips before you plant would cause a loss of power.
The hips move laterally during weight shift, then rotation occurs on the brace.
That's the discussion. Rotation actually is initiated and begins right before front foot plant.
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  #103  
Old 09-15-2020, 10:55 PM
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Originally Posted by SaROCaM View Post
Standstill is the basis of the throw. Many find they throw about 80% of their full distance from a standstill.



Do you still think the first move is rotational in nature, or linear? (not purely, but in terms of intent?)
It's linear and then rotational. It's initiated by the rear leg, just as in disc golf. The timing events just happen at different times in the two sports.
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  #104  
Old 09-15-2020, 11:35 PM
scooby snack scooby snack is offline
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Originally Posted by RoDeO View Post
Rotation actually is initiated and begins right before front foot plant.
Nope, for backhand dg throws this results in decreased power. Linear movement is initiated at this time with the weight shift.

Explosive rotation of the hips isn’t where the power to crush a drive comes from. The purpose of rotation is to relieve stress from your knee and shoulder.

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It's linear and then rotational.
Linear and then rotational is correct.
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  #105  
Old 09-16-2020, 12:05 AM
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Originally Posted by scooby snack View Post
Nope, for backhand dg throws this results in decreased power. Linear movement is initiated at this time with the weight shift.

Explosive rotation of the hips isn’t where the power to crush a drive comes from. The purpose of rotation is to relieve stress from your knee and shoulder.



Linear and then rotational is correct.
Explosive chain reaction of the hips and torso which creates torque which creates rotation which propels the disc. The faster one can rotate their torso the greater distance potential they can throw. To argue otherwise means one is all arming the disc. Without the rotational torsion there is no power. One can be really slow in the linear motion but explosive in their torso rotation and have great distance. One cannot be fast in linear motion and slow in torso rotation and have great distance.
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  #106  
Old 09-16-2020, 12:22 AM
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Originally Posted by RoDeO View Post
Explosive chain reaction of the hips and torso which creates torque which creates rotation which propels the disc. The faster one can rotate their torso the greater distance potential they can throw. To argue otherwise means one is all arming the disc. Without the rotational torsion there is no power. One can be really slow in the linear motion but explosive in their torso rotation and have great distance. One cannot be fast in linear motion and slow in torso rotation and have great distance.
"Rotators are the ones leaving the most left on the table"...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIQjrxfIm_Q&t=2m55s
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  #107  
Old 09-16-2020, 12:26 AM
scooby snack scooby snack is offline
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Originally Posted by RoDeO View Post
Explosive chain reaction of the hips and torso which creates torque which creates rotation which propels the disc. The faster one can rotate their torso the greater distance potential they can throw. To argue otherwise means one is all arming the disc. Without the rotational torsion there is no power. One can be really slow in the linear motion but explosive in their torso rotation and have great distance. One cannot be fast in linear motion and slow in torso rotation and have great distance.
Rotation is a by product of the throw. Your posts are indicative of not having a good brace. A correct brace will transfer all of the momentum from the weight shift into the disc, making rotation necessary.

It may seem to you that rotation is more powerful than linear movement, but it’s not. Opening the hips before you plant, is a momentum killer.

Lateral hip movement/weight shift into a brace that stops your forward movement, equates to power.
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  #108  
Old 09-16-2020, 12:48 AM
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Originally Posted by scooby snack View Post
Rotation is a by product of the throw. Your posts are indicative of not having a good brace. A correct brace will transfer all of the momentum from the weight shift into the disc, making rotation necessary.

It may seem to you that rotation is more powerful than linear movement, but it’s not. Opening the hips before you plant, is a momentum killer.

Lateral hip movement/weight shift into a brace that stops your forward movement, equates to power.
You be got it backwards. The throw or acceleration of the disc into release is the product of rotation. That rotation absolutely begins with the rear leg and hip initiating right before foot contact and weight shift. That rotation then moves up the core and the torso is also rotated around powerfully. As you bring the disc into the body the spin increases just like ice skaters who bring their arms in increases their spin. That allows even more velocity to propel the disc. The actual moment of when the hips open varies from player to player. The most important aspect though is that it's the rotational torque of the torso that translates into throwing for distance. The legs and hips initiate that rotation and it happens before weight shift into brace.
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  #109  
Old 09-16-2020, 01:03 AM
scooby snack scooby snack is offline
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Originally Posted by RoDeO View Post
You be got it backwards. The throw or acceleration of the disc into release is the product of rotation. That rotation absolutely begins with the rear leg and hip initiating right before foot contact and weight shift. That rotation then moves up the core and the torso is also rotated around powerfully. As you bring the disc into the body the spin increases just like ice skaters who bring their arms in increases their spin. That allows even more velocity to propel the disc. The actual moment of when the hips open varies from player to player. The most important aspect though is that it's the rotational torque of the torso that translates into throwing for distance. The legs and hips initiate that rotation and it happens before weight shift into brace.
Filed under advice to follow if you aren’t seeking good backhand form.

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Last edited by scooby snack; 09-16-2020 at 01:05 AM.
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  #110  
Old 09-16-2020, 01:04 AM
RandyC RandyC is online now
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Originally Posted by RoDeO View Post
Explosive chain reaction of the hips and torso which creates torque which creates rotation which propels the disc. The faster one can rotate their torso the greater distance potential they can throw. To argue otherwise means one is all arming the disc. Without the rotational torsion there is no power. One can be really slow in the linear motion but explosive in their torso rotation and have great distance. One cannot be fast in linear motion and slow in torso rotation and have great distance.
So all along I should have spun the bow instead of loading the string, do΄h its so obvious now. No wonder I suck at archery.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWxb4p-S-ig&t=239s
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