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Old 05-28-2015, 12:31 AM
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sjberry2017 sjberry2017 is offline
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Default Good disc to learn a Forehand with

Odds are this has been beaten to death, but I did search and couldn't find a thread recently which addressed this question, so here goes.

This summer I'm really trying to develop a forehand game. My backhand game is ok, just seriously inconsistent, which is partly due to form and partly due to being out of shape. However, I have had zero forehand game and I want to try to start developing that this summer. Since I know next to nothing about forehanding, I want to ask what disc would be good to learn with.

Right now I'm throwing standstill forehands with a 175 Champion Firechicken and a 170 X-out Champ Orc. Are these two discs going to be the best for learning a forehand, or should I disc up or disc down, learn with something flippy, get a meathook in between the two, or what?

I'm considering getting an SPD or a PD2, but is that the right choice? And no, brand does not matter. I'd love to get everyone's thoughts on this, and make a decision based off of that. Thanks!
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:34 AM
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Mike C Mike C is offline
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Your approach / driving putter, assuming its a stable mold and not overstable.

Continuing on the path you are on now will teach you bad habits and you won't develop touch and control.

Pick your favorite pitch and putt course. Bring 3-5 putters with you. Play a forehand only putter round, teeing off at least twice at each hole and playing from each drive. Putt however you normally do, otherwise don't throw a single backhand.

Most people never do this and it will show. A lot of players can only flick discs like your Firebird, and have no ability to take their understable mid and flick it around some trees on a high anny.

Imagine trying to learn backhand from the ground up with nothing but an Orc and Firebird. You have enough experience to know how bad of an idea that would be. Same is true for FH.

Last edited by Mike C; 05-28-2015 at 12:36 AM.
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:38 AM
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sjberry2017 sjberry2017 is offline
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So would the Envy be too overstable for that in your opinion, or exactly what you're talking about?
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:55 AM
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Mike C Mike C is offline
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The Envy is one of the best FH putters there are IMO, but it's a bit too overstable to be an ideal learning tool. Something more along the lines of an Ion, any Aviar variant, Anode, Judge etc., would be better, but the Envy would be waaaaay better than an OS driver.

You know how everyone says Comets are one of the best form work tools out there for BH? Same idea for FH. You want a disc that will do exactly what its told to, nothing more or less. The Envy can fight out of an anny release. So if you have some true neutral putters, try those. If not, the Envy will show form flaws much better than what you're currently using and will be a great disc to rely on for approach flicks once you feel more comfortable with your form.
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:58 AM
NSDallin NSDallin is offline
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There is an order of steps for learning forehand i believe in, but most people do them out of order.

The proper way in my opinon is to get a stable midrange like a buzzz or a truth and throw that disc in a field until you fine tune your snap to the point where that disc flys like it would if you were to throw it backhand. Dead straight with a tiny hyzer at the end. After you have mastered the straight shot you have a base chassis to work with for the rest of your forehand development. now you can start working on hyzer shots and anhyzer shots by manipulating your release angle. final step is work on your distance and armspeed.

I said in the beginning "most people do them out of order" because the majority of people will get an overstable disc and the will learn hyzers first. then they will learn turnover shots and distance on accident because their armspeed is getting stronger and they are turning over the disc more. last they will learn straight shots and proper control line shots after they have found a balance between turning discs over and hyzering them off. This is not the way i recommend, but it is unfortunately the way more people progress with their sidearm. Try not to do this if possible.
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Old 05-28-2015, 01:08 AM
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Halcón Halcón is offline
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FH, much more than BH, is more about the feel of the grip, than the disc's stability. There are many here, including Mike, who can FH just about any disc. I prefer a flatter disc, with a low profile. Whatever disc you choose, no matter its stability, make sure it feels good in the hand.
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Old 05-28-2015, 01:14 AM
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I'd agree with that. You can learn to make any disc work, but something flat like a Buzzz IMO is easier to flick than a domey Roc.
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Old 05-28-2015, 01:23 AM
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Someone say firebird already,

just kidding
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Old 05-28-2015, 02:20 AM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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I went from never using forehand unless I'm behind a tree and it's the only option, to now throwing low effort 320'+ shots (low laser beam) over the winter/spring...and I'm sure that distance can be significantly greater if I threw with over 70% power. Do not keep learning with the Firebird. I have one and love it, and use it on the course all the time, but it is terrible for learning FH with. If you can't flick well, it then rewards high arm speed and anhyzer/flex releases. If you can flick well, then it is very consistent.

I would just take my stack of putters and mids, stand at a basket, and flick them ~100' away from myself or as far as I could with no wobble (with these discs, wrist snap is best rather than arm speed). Go to the group of them, stack them up, then flick back at the basket. Putt them in...make a game of it. Repeat.

Eventually when I could throw the stack without getting much or any wobble I added in some fairway drivers. Don't even bother caring about how far you throw things...just throw them flat and no OAT. Trust me, if you can flick your mids flat at 150' (which I know isn't very far) you can definitely flick a driver with some added arm speed.

I have an SPD and it's a fantastic straight flick disc. I wouldn't recommend learning to flick with it from stage 1, but definitely pick one up and start using it. It carries way straighter than the Firebird but is still really reliable.

Learning with drivers rewards a fast throw to avoid the fade, but doesn't penalize you as much for poor snap. Learning the snap first as a necessary step with unforgiving discs teaches you the important ending of the shot. Going into this stage of the throw faster is very easy to learn. It takes almost no time to go from flicking mids to flicking drivers...unlike with the steep learning curve of high speed drivers for backhand.

Last edited by slowplastic; 05-28-2015 at 02:24 AM.
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Old 05-28-2015, 04:06 AM
THUGNIFICENT763 THUGNIFICENT763 is offline
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I push the Champion Banshee pretty hard for learner forehanders. Back in the day I liked Z Reapers and Z Talons, but those are history : (
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