#11  
Old 02-22-2018, 01:16 AM
rayoflight rayoflight is offline
Bogey Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Courses Played: 9
Posts: 55
Niced 34 Times in 19 Posts
Default

For a long time I could never get my forehand out for as much distance as my backhand because adding power always caused the disc to wobble and act really understable. What helped me reduce the wobble on my disc so that I could throw harder was to do a towel drill. I basically just grabbed a dish towel by one corner and tried to make the opposite corner fly in a straight line along the plane of my imaginary forehand throw. If the towel flares out or twists up as you're going through the motion, then you're doing something wrong. The force of your throw should basically pull the towel taut and whip the opposite corner around in an arc that travels on a flat plane.

It also helps to just play catch with someone and throw forehands to them. This makes you practice distance control, and it's a lot easier to throw a bunch of throws in a short time if you don't have to go pick up the disc yourself every time you throw it. Plus you don't feel the pressure to throw super hard like you do when throwing a disc golf drive. By playing catch, you'll naturally focus on throwing in a smooth and controlled manner instead so that the other person can catch it.
Sponsored Links

Niced: (1)
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-22-2018, 06:05 PM
Tudbus Tudbus is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 13
Niced 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

I’ll give this a try for sure. That’s what I’m having trouble with. If I try too hard it wobbles and have no glide. Will try the towel drill and hopefully it will help me too.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-16-2018, 08:53 AM
Disc Golf Doctor Disc Golf Doctor is offline
Par Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: CT
Courses Played: 9
Posts: 134
Niced 123 Times in 50 Posts
Default

Your grip is fine in the video. You have to keep your palm up as you follow through. That is probably why you are turning it over with a late release because you are rolling your wrist. The only way to keep the disc on a single line and consistent is to not roll your wrist (keeping the palm up). I agree that the disc needs to stay at the same angle the whole time and not start so vertical. I discussed forehand grip in part of this video: https://youtu.be/r9e9rGyaYgE
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-16-2018, 12:34 PM
sidewinder22's Avatar
sidewinder22 sidewinder22 is offline
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Creeping Creek DGC
Years Playing: 15.8
Courses Played: 253
Posts: 19,520
Niced 6,971 Times in 4,021 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Disc Golf Doctor View Post
You have to keep your palm up as you follow through. That is probably why you are turning it over with a late release because you are rolling your wrist. The only way to keep the disc on a single line and consistent is to not roll your wrist (keeping the palm up).
Welcome to the board Doc, but I respectfully disagree and please correct me if I'm wrong and provide sources if possible. The medical journals I've read regarding the biomechanics of baseball pitching and tennis forehand have stated that you should pronate in the follow through. If you supinate in the follow through your arm must finish high which is off plane and restricts your extension/whip through the hit. If you swing your arm on a level swing plane, pronation allows more extension/whip through the hit and more on plane level rotary follow through with safer deceleration of the UCL. Now with the level arm swing relative your body, you adjust your body tilt angle to the release angle.

https://www.topvelocity.net/pronatio...enting-injury/
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-16-2018, 02:01 PM
pearlybakerbest pearlybakerbest is offline
Birdie Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Finger Lakes
Years Playing: 18.1
Courses Played: 64
Posts: 262
Niced 220 Times in 103 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sidewinder22 View Post
Welcome to the board Doc, but I respectfully disagree and please correct me if I'm wrong and provide sources if possible. The medical journals I've read regarding the biomechanics of baseball pitching and tennis forehand have stated that you should pronate in the follow through. If you supinate in the follow through your arm must finish high which is off plane and restricts your extension/whip through the hit. If you swing your arm on a level swing plane, pronation allows more extension/whip through the hit and more on plane level rotary follow through with safer deceleration of the UCL. Now with the level arm swing relative your body, you adjust your body tilt angle to the release angle.

https://www.topvelocity.net/pronatio...enting-injury/
This is right on. I throw tons of forehands and was FH exclusive on drives for my first few years after switching to DG from Ultimate. The only time I don't fully pronate at follow through is if I am trying to hit a high hyzer line over or around an obstacle. Watch any proficient FHer, their thumb always finishes on the left with palm down or at slight angle(RHFH) when attempting to flip the disc to flat and get a full flight pattern. Wrist rolling is when you actively try to force a disc over during your release resulting in OAT, often because the thrown disc is to stable for your arm speed. So many people learn to FH this way with really over stable discs that will fight out of the OAT and give them a seemingly full flight. This is why learning to FH with neutral or US discs is so important.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-16-2018, 02:07 PM
etdefender19's Avatar
etdefender19 etdefender19 is offline
Eagle Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Elk Grove, CA
Years Playing: 6.5
Courses Played: 31
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 859
Niced 589 Times in 291 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sidewinder22 View Post
Welcome to the board Doc, but I respectfully disagree and please correct me if I'm wrong and provide sources if possible. The medical journals I've read regarding the biomechanics of baseball pitching and tennis forehand have stated that you should pronate in the follow through. If you supinate in the follow through your arm must finish high which is off plane and restricts your extension/whip through the hit. If you swing your arm on a level swing plane, pronation allows more extension/whip through the hit and more on plane level rotary follow through with safer deceleration of the UCL. Now with the level arm swing relative your body, you adjust your body tilt angle to the release angle.

https://www.topvelocity.net/pronatio...enting-injury/
I can confirm this is true for me - at least as it relates to my 3/4-slash-sidearm pitching release
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-17-2018, 02:24 PM
BPC2000's Avatar
BPC2000 BPC2000 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Years Playing: 10.4
Courses Played: 52
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 22
Niced 17 Times in 8 Posts
Default

This drill actual helped me quite bit. You snap the disc out of your hand, as high as you can, with the least amount of wobble as possible. It helps me get the muscle memory for on-axis wrist/finger action. It also trains you a bit to avoid wrist roll. The drill uses gravity to mimic the disc lagging behind the loosened wrist/fingers and helps to time the moment you activate them for the snap at the release of the disc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiWvum5p1rg

Something to note.....In the drill the forearm is supinated a little further than in an actual sidearm throw where the disc is more parallel to the ground. Some tweaking is needed to get it to translate to an actual throw where forearm position is concerned. Its more about getting the wrist/finger snap action down for a more on-axis release
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-17-2018, 02:46 PM
BPC2000's Avatar
BPC2000 BPC2000 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Years Playing: 10.4
Courses Played: 52
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 22
Niced 17 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BPC2000 View Post
This drill actual helped me quite bit. You snap the disc out of your hand, as high as you can, with the least amount of wobble as possible. It helps me get the muscle memory for on-axis wrist/finger action. It also trains you a bit to avoid wrist roll. The drill uses gravity to mimic the disc lagging behind the loosened wrist/fingers and helps to time the moment you activate them for the snap at the release of the disc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiWvum5p1rg

Something to note.....In the drill the forearm is supinated a little further than in an actual sidearm throw where the disc is more parallel to the ground. Some tweaking is needed to get it to translate to an actual throw where forearm position is concerned. Its more about getting the wrist/finger snap action down for a more on-axis release
I realized after watching the video again that spin is more important than height of the throw.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-17-2018, 08:48 PM
armiller's Avatar
armiller armiller is online now
* Ace Member *
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Years Playing: 7.1
Courses Played: 241
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 3,853
Niced 1,146 Times in 705 Posts
Default

I'm lazy and haven't read everything you guys are saying or referencing about pronation/wrist action. But I do think it can be a bit of a distractor. Wrist flexion is far more important than wrist pronation (or supination). Get that motion down, with the weight shift, and I think a 330'-350' forehand is very reasonable, even from a one step run up.

Maybe it's just me, but one of the main things I've learned with grip is to get the disc such in your hand so that you're engaging your wrist flexors. Lately, I've been happily giving up 30' of distance to gain a lot of consistency by doing a little less of this, (yeah I'm not proud of that one) and getting a smoother motion that also happens to be better for one's body.

For what it's worth, I'm not a guy who's hoping to go pro or even dominate local tournaments. But I do hope I can keep throwing both forehands and backhands for a long time, and have fun on even the most challenging courses. By the way, Nate Sexton's recent forehand video from Infinite is pretty awesome.

I'll also add: I think the pronation and/or wrist roll thing gets a lot of attention because it's a very common, easy-to-make mistake. So I believe many of us have been helped by the "palm to the sky" tip.

Last edited by armiller; 03-17-2018 at 08:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
 

  #20  
Old 03-17-2018, 10:39 PM
UncleBrother2001's Avatar
UncleBrother2001 UncleBrother2001 is offline
aka Starfirebird/Uncle Matt
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: 1969 Impala
Years Playing: 21.1
Throwing Style: RHBH
Posts: 132
Niced 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Youtube is great for finding videos to help with form. Back when I first started you had to ask around the course for tips. Now with the wonders of the internet you can find great info and visuals on youtube for help.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Forehand Technique Disc Golf Doctor Technique & Strategy 13 07-24-2021 04:46 PM
Forehand Technique: control 300' in the woods kolby_wan_kenobi Form Analysis/Critique 7 04-13-2016 11:24 PM
Forehand Technique? Andurain Technique & Strategy 10 03-31-2014 10:51 PM
forehand technique pzacch05 Technique & Strategy 3 05-22-2011 10:28 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.