#11  
Old 12-29-2019, 10:02 PM
air show air show is offline
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My story is pretty much the same as yours. When I first started the forehand it was very frustrating but I also remembered how frustrating my backhand was when I first started throwing. So I decided to learn the FH the same way I learned the BH.
Watched many videos of Sexton, Ricky, and Big Germ to name a few and started putting the FH into my practice routine no matter how bad I sucked at it. Over time I am beginning to see some good results and now am glad I started throwing forehand. Also learning to take it easy early on is hard to do but will pay off in the end because of elbow and shoulder pain. A good rule is don't do it if it hurts. You are going to have fun learning the forehand and will begin to realize what a great tool it is for your game.

PS. I also found that all my discs react the same whether I throw BH or FH I just use this knowledge accordingly.
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  #12  
Old 12-29-2019, 11:23 PM
Casey 1988 Casey 1988 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidewinder22 View Post
IMO a Banshee would be a much better choice than FB. Putters/mids can be a lot more frustrating FH simply because you get less spin naturally, and really have to finesse them.

My elbow is basically locked/loaded to the shoulder, so shoulder moves, elbow moves with it. The wandering elbow you are describing sounds like the "Inverted W" I describe in vid.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBrlJ9mDbhQ
My dad did his first forehand with disc golf discs using a Wasp and that was his first throw ever with a disc golf disc. He also learned in the 1970's to throw the US Wham-O discs forehand just to have the disc fly the way an OS disc will. I agree in saying to not use Putters but midrange or longer with non OS discs will work to learn. In fact the higher glide of the 180 gram diameter midrange will help with learning the forehand and help things a little.

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  #13  
Old 12-30-2019, 12:39 AM
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CwAlbino CwAlbino is offline
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If thrown correctly, you should have no issues with a forehand. My forehand isn't near what it used to be but if I play a forehand round it seems to come back quickly. If you focus on the follow through and the angle of your hand on the follow through, you'll save yourself the injuries. Firebird or not, doesn't really matter. Smooth is far. Make sure your hand stays on the same plane the entire time with a continuous acceleration. Even a firebird is going to wobble out of your hand if it's thrown with off axis torque. It just won't crash and burn.

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  #14  
Old 12-30-2019, 02:49 AM
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Turd Reynolds Turd Reynolds is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfhaley View Post
I've been playing for over 15 years now. I play quite a bit but have never really "clicked" throwing forehand. I dabble with it from time to time and can throw upshots decent enough, for me at least. My question is whether I should even try to improve this next year. I'll be 36, so I'm not that old, but I've been throwing backhand the whole time. When I first started I used to throw thumbers all the time. Now I throw them ONLY when I have to. I feel like I've seen a lot threads on here about sidearm/forehand soreness from members who've been playing a long time. Is this something that I'd be advised not even getting into at this point. I throw annys pretty good but having a forehand has it's benefits as well. Looking for thoughts from the 35 and over crowd?
What up dude?
I'm 36yrs old as well. I just started playing this last spring and threw backhand for the first 5 months but switched over to RHFH because of some serious back issues. It came pretty natural for me coming from a baseball background thru HS and college and I could get all my 9-10speed drivers out past 320 after about 2months of throwing 80% of my drives and approach shorts RHFH.

I started with a Innova Pig (3/1/0/3) and a 175gm MVP Volt (8/5/-0.5/2)
Even tho Id roll my wrist over or try to muscle the hell out of the Volt off the Tee and burn 1 outta 4 drives the 1st few rounds, after a few trips to the practice field I started figuring it out.
The Pig is a no brainer RHFH, very forgiving like (more so than even a Zone) but so OS it didn't help my form at all but did help with my confidence, plus they're REALLY fun to throw!


I've had my right rotator cuff completely rebuilt twice, the last time 11yrs ago and unless I go throw a bag of drivers for 100 or more shots my shoulder feels fine man. It got more sore throwing BH truthfully. I know 2 other guys that have had shoulder surgeries, & 1 guy with just a bad shoulder that all drive and approach sidearm/forehand 75-90% of the time because they swear it hurts less and I tend to agree.

I just warm it up really REALLY GOOD before I start throwing hard with bands doing, external and internal rotator movements then throwing several putter shots with increasing power from 150ish out to the low 200's before hitting the teebox.

Beginning discs that are flattopped, stable and felt good to me FH Ive used to work up to distance drivers are the:
Pig* 3/1/0/3
Zone 4/3/0/3
TeeBird 7/5/0/2
Leopard 3* 7/4/-2/1
Volt* 8/5/-0.5/2. (A must have FH fairway imo)
TeeBird 3* 8/4/0/2

Max weight handles the torque better FH imo

Hope that ads some insight. Good luck and enjoy that novel 👆🏻 lol

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  #15  
Old 12-30-2019, 05:16 AM
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wolfhaley wolfhaley is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turd Reynolds View Post
What up dude?
I'm 36yrs old as well. I just started playing this last spring and threw backhand for the first 5 months but switched over to RHFH because of some serious back issues. It came pretty natural for me coming from a baseball background thru HS and college and I could get all my 9-10speed drivers out past 320 after about 2months of throwing 80% of my drives and approach shorts RHFH.

I started with a Innova Pig (3/1/0/3) and a 175gm MVP Volt (8/5/-0.5/2)
Even tho Id roll my wrist over or try to muscle the hell out of the Volt off the Tee and burn 1 outta 4 drives the 1st few rounds, after a few trips to the practice field I started figuring it out.
The Pig is a no brainer RHFH, very forgiving like (more so than even a Zone) but so OS it didn't help my form at all but did help with my confidence, plus they're REALLY fun to throw!


I've had my right rotator cuff completely rebuilt twice, the last time 11yrs ago and unless I go throw a bag of drivers for 100 or more shots my shoulder feels fine man. It got more sore throwing BH truthfully. I know 2 other guys that have had shoulder surgeries, & 1 guy with just a bad shoulder that all drive and approach sidearm/forehand 75-90% of the time because they swear it hurts less and I tend to agree.

I just warm it up really REALLY GOOD before I start throwing hard with bands doing, external and internal rotator movements then throwing several putter shots with increasing power from 150ish out to the low 200's before hitting the teebox.

Beginning discs that are flattopped, stable and felt good to me FH Ive used to work up to distance drivers are the:
Pig* 3/1/0/3
Zone 4/3/0/3
TeeBird 7/5/0/2
Leopard 3* 7/4/-2/1
Volt* 8/5/-0.5/2. (A must have FH fairway imo)
TeeBird 3* 8/4/0/2

Max weight handles the torque better FH imo

Hope that ads some insight. Good luck and enjoy that novel 👆🏻 lol
It's nice to meet you Turd! I have no baseball background whatsoever. I feel like that's a reason why sidearm seems so foreign to me. I have all of the discs you listed as well. I've been throwing both Pigs and Zones RHBH this year for the first time. MVP Volt is actually the only mold by them I own. I'll test it out FH. I like the Zone over the Pig backhand because it's much more versatile.

P.S. Who are you really Turd?
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  #16  
Old 12-30-2019, 08:19 AM
mojorooks mojorooks is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfhaley View Post
I've been playing for over 15 years now. I play quite a bit but have never really "clicked" throwing forehand. I dabble with it from time to time and can throw upshots decent enough, for me at least. My question is whether I should even try to improve this next year. I'll be 36, so I'm not that old, but I've been throwing backhand the whole time. When I first started I used to throw thumbers all the time. Now I throw them ONLY when I have to. I feel like I've seen a lot threads on here about sidearm/forehand soreness from members who've been playing a long time. Is this something that I'd be advised not even getting into at this point. I throw annys pretty good but having a forehand has it's benefits as well. Looking for thoughts from the 35 and over crowd?
I keep thinking about this myself but the other way. I learned forehand to start and keep thinking about learning backhand. I just know that when I finally do, I need to use it exclusively for a solid year to really get good.

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  #17  
Old 12-30-2019, 08:34 AM
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Keller Keller is offline
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If you have the patience, learning forehands with 150 class stuff is very rewarding.

I've been throwing a 150 class bag for quite awhile, it's fun. And flicking light putters is a blast.

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  #18  
Old 12-30-2019, 01:05 PM
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mgcoleman mgcoleman is offline
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I'm 53 and I transitioned several years ago to playing mostly FH due to chronic shoulder pain from years of playing baseball in high school and college. I struggled mostly because I didn't put in the field work on FH form (I have since). I also struggled because I wanted to stick with Excaliburs and Destroyers as my go-to drivers. I have since dialed back my expectations to match the realities of my physical capabilities and Thunderbirds, TLs, Teebirds and Rats are now the backbone of my bag. Nothing that, by name, will make people say "wow", but I don't care. I know how to throw them well, on line most of the time and I can play several rounds in a day pain free.

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  #19  
Old 12-30-2019, 02:21 PM
Kegelexercise Kegelexercise is offline
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Default FH primary player here:

I'm about your age, too. Many have recommended a variety of videos on FH form, and I will mostly agree with them, but add on a few things I feel have helped me out personally:

1) Keep a compact motion - the least successful FH's I've ever thrown are when I try to reach way back and strong-arm it - keeping a compact motion where your shoulder/elbow stay close, time your wrist snap with your plant foot setting and firing off, and letting your legs do a lot of the work, is what forms the basis of my forehand. Avoiding the wild reach-back is one thing I believe has allowed me avoid injury being an FH primary shooter for a decade+...it takes a TON of discing in a short period of time before I start feeling any sore elbow or shoulder muscles, and even that goes away within a day or two.

2) Actively concentrate on a flat release angle. A lot of my meathooks have come from getting lazy and releasing the outside of the disc down & right, and a lot of my turn and burns have come from allowing my wrist to roll over on my step-through and firing it off with the outside of disc raised way up. Once you get the hang of that, then you can start concentrating on tilting your wrist to release at moderate hyzer or anny angles to get more advanced flight lines. Single-step shots help with this - a run up complicates things (but is something you can add on once you feel more comfortable with your form)

3) The grip that has worked the best for me is the index and middle finger forming a V, outside of middle finger against the rim of the disc, pad of index finger controlling the bottom of the disc, and thumb holding the top. I realize this is not optimal for pure power, but I've found this grip gives so much more back in control than what you lose in power. YMMV though, so settle on the grip you feel most comfortable with.

Hope this helps, and happy discing!

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Last edited by Kegelexercise; 12-30-2019 at 02:23 PM.
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  #20  
Old 12-30-2019, 03:28 PM
IHearChains IHearChains is offline
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I agree with the advice to learn with neutral or understable discs. You will know your technique is refined when you can throw a hyzerflip in the woods with a forehand, hit a tunnel, and get it to finish straight and flat. The Buzzz is a great disc for those shots, if your technique is good.

You can always reach for the beefy firebird later if you need it to finish with that wild skip to the right, but that is more of a specialty shot, you don't want every forehand to finish that way.

I recommend taking a stack of Buzzzes or putters out to a field to refine your technique. Practice short standstill throws with just the wrist snap, without a lot of arm movement. Focus on the wrist snap and keeping the disc on the same plane throughout your wrist motion. Once you get them flipping up to finish straight, or holding a hyzer line when you put more hyzer on it. Then you can bring incorporate more of the arm and footwork along with the wrist snap. After that you can start to translate the throw to higher speed discs, but go back and revisit the Buzzz if you have trouble with drivers.


Last edited by IHearChains; 12-30-2019 at 03:31 PM.
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