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Old 12-13-2017, 08:17 PM
shawnstarr shawnstarr is offline
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Default struggling with 20-30ft putts

I've been playing for 6 years. I'm working on improving my push putting but struggling with consistency at the edge of the circle. A lot of my putts fall low and wobbly. If i try to add power or spin to correct this, i start missing right to left. Usually high left (im a lefty). Any advice?


https://youtu.be/3qvvJIEnmUU


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  #2  
Old 12-13-2017, 08:39 PM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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You aren't countering/pushing your rear hip to drive your weight forward. What you are doing now is shifting your pelvis straight from the load to the putt motion, and relying on just your rear foot to counter the throw. You should feel your rear hip, right in your case, go slightly behind your front hip. This will push all of your weight onto your front leg/hip, and then the rear foot will go up and behind you to more effectively counter the putt.

Because you aren't getting the hip shift the right way I think you're trying to overdo the weight transfer and your shoulders are getting past your front foot, so you then have to kick up your rear foot a bunch to prevent tipping over and stepping/foot faulting.

This is probably in that circle's edge range. Watch how McBeth starts with his pelvis around 45 degrees, and drives his rear hip behind/into the front one to really get his weight forward. He starts at 45 degrees but ends around 70 degrees. If you see him jump putt where he really needs power he almost lands past 180 degrees and slightly backwards to the basket.


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Old 12-13-2017, 09:36 PM
UhhNegative UhhNegative is offline
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To add to what SP said, there's a great Feldberg clinic where he teaches players to find their putting stance by jumping up and landing sideways. You want to be a little more closed to the target.



Additionally, you might want to look at your grip and how the disc releases from your hand. I definitely struggle with getting a consistent grip and consistent pressure. Dave goes over grip as well in this clinic, I believe. I get my best flying putts when I'm not thinking about releasing the disc, it just comes out of the hand if the timing and lower body is right. When that all lines up it feels like almost no effort even for a 30' putt. Take that with a grain of salt though, I'm not a great putter.

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Last edited by UhhNegative; 12-13-2017 at 09:39 PM.
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Old 12-13-2017, 11:12 PM
deyo7 deyo7 is offline
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What has been helpful to me is to think of moving my center of mass as one unit, keeping entire core/COM moving together into the backswing AND then, likewise, when shifting forward to put, keeping entire COM momentum together in line towards the target. If arms, upper body, lower body aren't all in sync it creates hitches/problems. Notice in attached picture how, because the disc is way out in front of you and because you are leaning over your weight is still, at least partially, on your front foot. Try standing more upright (and maybe bring disc closer, should likely move with your COM), which will help you shift weight onto back leg and then move forward as one unit. You can think of your entire core or even just abdomen as throwing the disc as you shift forward... let that movement be what simultaneously propels your hand open (like sprinkling water at basket) toward the target.

That's what's working for me anyway. I'll take any critique of the above, I'm still a newb. But getting better at putting and feel like I'm getting it figured out. "I'm in the ZONE!"

Although Ricky gets a lot of flak for not being an exceptional speaker, I think there is a lot of good information in this clinic he and Paige put on:

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Old 12-13-2017, 11:58 PM
RFrance RFrance is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post
You aren't countering/pushing your rear hip to drive your weight forward. What you are doing now is shifting your pelvis straight from the load to the putt motion, and relying on just your rear foot to counter the throw. You should feel your rear hip, right in your case, go slightly behind your front hip. This will push all of your weight onto your front leg/hip, and then the rear foot will go up and behind you to more effectively counter the putt.

Because you aren't getting the hip shift the right way I think you're trying to overdo the weight transfer and your shoulders are getting past your front foot, so you then have to kick up your rear foot a bunch to prevent tipping over and stepping/foot faulting.

This is probably in that circle's edge range.
This is what I've be doing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post
Watch how McBeth starts with his pelvis around 45 degrees, and drives his rear hip behind/into the front one to really get his weight forward. He starts at 45 degrees but ends around 70 degrees.
This is what I tried tonight. I was able to finally get putts in this range to stay pretty much level instead of increasing hyzer as I moved back. It makes sense and goes along with the shifting the weight from behind like for BH and FH.
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Old 12-14-2017, 12:29 AM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RFrance View Post
This is what I tried tonight. I was able to finally get putts in this range to stay pretty much level instead of increasing hyzer as I moved back. It makes sense and goes along with the shifting the weight from behind like for BH and FH.
Yeah it's been a game changer for me this season. I used to have to worry about step putting or something funky past circle's edge, or really lob it and have to aim to the side to account for fade. Figuring out this hip shift thing makes it effortless to get 45' putts to fly straight and not even think about stepping forward. My max comfort/distance range now is 65' or so with a jump/step; not hitting them all the time but they are going straight and getting there chain high. It's not like I'm a fantastic putter but I'm so much better than I was a year ago and my range is so much farther.

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Old 12-14-2017, 02:02 AM
shawnstarr shawnstarr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post
You aren't countering/pushing your rear hip to drive your weight forward. What you are doing now is shifting your pelvis straight from the load to the putt motion, and relying on just your rear foot to counter the throw. You should feel your rear hip, right in your case, go slightly behind your front hip. This will push all of your weight onto your front leg/hip, and then the rear foot will go up and behind you to more effectively counter the putt.

Because you aren't getting the hip shift the right way I think you're trying to overdo the weight transfer and your shoulders are getting past your front foot, so you then have to kick up your rear foot a bunch to prevent tipping over and stepping/foot faulting.

This is probably in that circle's edge range. Watch how McBeth starts with his pelvis around 45 degrees, and drives his rear hip behind/into the front one to really get his weight forward. He starts at 45 degrees but ends around 70 degrees. If you see him jump putt where he really needs power he almost lands past 180 degrees and slightly backwards to the basket.

Thanks for the great advice. I think you're onto something here. I usually try to face the basket too much and it feels really akward. I'll try turning my hip to the side a bit more on my release and let you know how it goes.

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Old 12-14-2017, 02:04 AM
shawnstarr shawnstarr is offline
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After looking at the video i also notice the disc leaves my hand nose down and i end uo having to release really high to counter act this. Any advice for getting the nose up on my release?

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Old 12-14-2017, 02:20 AM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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Your nose angle is fine on the putts that you release cleanly. Everyone putts different, so do what works for you, but I like nose neutral to slightly down. I find it cuts through wind better, doesn't fade at the end, and powers into and down in the basket at impact. Your poor nose angle on some putts is because of bad sequencing. It's from a saggy weight transfer, and as deyo7 said you don't always load your body and disc at the same time. Sometimes you load into your hips and the disc is still in front. If you start in the wrong position then you're setting yourself up for failure and it's just a fluke if your weight and disc hit at the same time.

Also don't think of it as "turning the hip to the side at release"...think of it as driving the rear hip into the front hip. The weight shift from the rear leg should be INTO the front leg, the way to do that is by getting the rear hip behind and into the front hip. This way you'll be in balance on the front leg, and your entire core will move forward and into the putt. Hopefully this makes sense, it has made a massive difference in my putting ease.

Edit: In the clip I posted above you can see McBeth's rear hip instantly "snaps" behind the front hip to drive forward, then some additional momentum in the follow through gives it a lazy drift behind farther. But the point is that the hip goes that direction to shift the weight, not just to counter. It shouldn't feel aggressive, but it should just feel balanced.

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Last edited by slowplastic; 12-14-2017 at 02:25 AM.
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Old 12-14-2017, 02:52 AM
RandyC RandyC is offline
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It΄s all about your stance, how your pelvis sets up. Since you have both your legs pointed at the basket its pretty hard to get your rear hip behind your front hip. http://www.mma.tv/wp-content/uploads...ucelee-pic.jpg

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