#21  
Old 04-15-2018, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by tbird888 View Post
All of these molds are available in DX in more weights than what are in the starter pack. I'm not sure what you're hoping to gain by picking different molds, but there's a reason these discs are in the starter pack.

In my experience most new players are confused with more than a couple discs. I get a lot of "is this a midrange shot because we're not on the tee anymore?" and "when do I use my putter?" I've found, for me, the best way to get a new person into the game is to keep them in the fairway. Once they have to scramble out of the woods, the fun is lost. The disc mold they're throwing is only important to me, the disc nerd.

Good luck with the group! It's a lot of fun to introduce new players to the game.


I am not questioning the validity of the discs included in the Innova Starter packs; just expressing my surprise that the price on them seems to be higher than the same three individual discs sold separately.

It is my intention that each player will have just one disc. But, that they can have some relatively small set of choices. The players will have the opportunity to play catch for a bit before the round, so they can get a feel for them. The discs are all going to be about the same performance-wise. But, I would like the players to have some variety of disc shapes since we all prefer different feels.
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  #22  
Old 04-15-2018, 08:09 AM
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One reason the mid is a particularly good option is that it can double as a pretty decent putter. That's my experience with a Buzzz, at least. Getting each person a Buzzz (or Shark or Truth?) ought to make for a decent one disc round, especially if it's not a real long course.

I also would have suggested Comet if it came in baseline plastic. Also a very good putter.

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Old 04-15-2018, 08:13 AM
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Without reading the other posts, IMO you can't go wrong with a 150 DX Aero. Very Frisbee like, very easy to throw and control. I carry one in my bag not only to give away to newbs but because after all these years I still enjoy throwing one.
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Old 04-15-2018, 10:19 AM
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I echo Teebird's sentiment: less is more - keep it simple. The only people who care about this mold vs. that mold are DG nerds like us.

Don't even get involved with different feeling molds in a given speed category. If they don't know other mids feel different, they'll get used to what they're given.

No 1st time players should be able to throw more than 2-3 molds. More discs sets them down the road that it's the arrow rather than the archer. No mold is a fix the newb-hyzer, so don't even start down that road. Let them focus on a flat release and staying in the fairway. Until they do that with consistency, nothing else matters. Chances of 1st timers genuinely overpowering a Leo: slim to none.

If any of them decide to pursue the game further, they'll find out on their ownthat there are more disc decisions than they can possibly fathom.

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Last edited by BogeyNoMore; 04-15-2018 at 10:23 AM.
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Old 04-15-2018, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Dthunderchicken View Post
Without reading the other posts, IMO you can't go wrong with a 150 DX Aero. Very Frisbee like, very easy to throw and control. I carry one in my bag not only to give away to newbs but because after all these years I still enjoy throwing one.


DX Aeros do interest me, but I think they may now be OOP, and are getting rather rare. I looked into them, and have found that it would be difficult for me to get a good selection of colors at any weight.


Classic Rocs, XDs, Aeros, Skeeters, Spiders - all easy to use molds that are going (or have already gone) the way of the dodo, it appears.
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  #26  
Old 04-15-2018, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by BogeyNoMore View Post
I echo Teebird's sentiment: less is more - keep it simple. The only people who care about this mold vs. that mold are DG nerds like us.

Don't even get involved with different feeling molds in a given speed category. If they don't know other mids feel different, they'll get used to what they're given.

No 1st time players should be able to throw more than 2-3 molds. More discs sets them down the road that it's the arrow rather than the archer. No mold is a fix the newb-hyzer, so don't even start down that road. Let them focus on a flat release and staying in the fairway. Until they do that with consistency, nothing else matters. Chances of 1st timers genuinely overpowering a Leo: slim to none.

If any of them decide to pursue the game further, they'll find out on their own that there are more disc decisions than they can possibly fathom.


Well, yes, put that way, I agree with you. I am probably just overanalyzing the situation, and just making it worse. Simpler it is then.
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Old 04-15-2018, 11:04 AM
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Just for kicks, I thought I'd ask what you all would think if I were to supply all the participants with DX Wolfs.

I noticed that Innova recently released a run of nice new embossed Wolfs. Can anyone give me a comparison of the Wolfs in the new embossed run with those that are pre-embossed? This obviously deserves another thread detailing the intricacies of everyone's favorite mold.

What do you think? How badly could I corrupt them all before they even had a chance to know what a good disc is?
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  #28  
Old 04-15-2018, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Jimb View Post
If you go with the Innova DX starter sets the players could switch discs during the round and would get to try out different molds. Plus it might save you a couple dollars, too.
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Originally Posted by swhite View Post
I am giving serious thought to these molds. I had not thought to get some DX starter sets. It turns out that Innova's starter sets cost more per disc than the separate discs do. Oh well, I like the idea of hand picking the weights myself anyway.
Innova starter sets at Acadamy $19.99. For 3 disks
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Old 04-15-2018, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Motorpro View Post
Innova starter sets at Acadamy $19.99. For 3 disks

Oh, that's a good price. I'll have to check it out.
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  #30  
Old 04-15-2018, 12:00 PM
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Keep it with one disc per player. You wrote about them playing one session only. Now way, a new player will be able to learn to throw multiple discs in his first session. The only sensible case for more than one disc is one putter and one thrower, where the putter is only for putting and the thrower is for everything else. But in my experience, new players don't need a separate putter on their first day. A midrange putts well enough.

Concerning drivers: As someone wrote, the main goal is staying on the fairway. Drivers don't help with that. If they provide some more meters, they usually fly more left or right or up. Hence, get a midrange for each person. More important is that the mid has enough HSS, that better players can give it some juice.

Give each player one midrange. Offer them multiple molds to choose from, because hands are different and preference for names and logos are different -- style and color matter! Ensure that the last player still has a choice -- this is so important!

Each player should throw only one disc in this session, because that provides the highest chance, he will learn to know this one disc, a bit at least. (If this disc doesn't work, he can exchange it with another player or with the leftover discs ... just as we do, when our beloved workhorse disc doesn't work for us today.)

There are so many threads on DGCR that emphasise, knowing your discs. And then, here, people would give a new player, for his first and possibly only disc golf session -- How many hours of discgolfing are we talking about? Two maybe? --, three discs, when he's not even able to throw a single one!

For success: Stick to one disc per player. Keep it as simple as possible.

For motivation: Provide choices, like molds and colors to choose from in the initial disc selection (not during play). (Tell them that all discs are about to fly the same.)
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