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Old 11-03-2018, 02:29 PM
Jolt Jolt is offline
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Default Old discs . .better made?

I started to play again 2y ago after a long break . .
I have after this "new start" bought over 250 discs from almost every disc ompany.

Most of the disc have some "flashing" , Sharp edges and other moulding foults.

I have to use sandpaper on maybe 85% of all the discs i bought to get rid of Sharp edges.

Today i took out some of my +15y old discs from storage, some new and some used hard.

I was really amazed how Smooth all the discs was, no flashing no sharp edges
So did the manufacturer spend more time perfecting each disc 15y ago?

Also interesting was the wear . . My old Z and Champion, basicly the first ones to come out have +100 rounds on them and not much were at all.

Some of my new Z and Champ have more were after a few rounds . . . .so old plastics was better?!?
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Old 11-03-2018, 03:05 PM
Moose33 Moose33 is online now
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It depends on the manufacture, like Lightning and older Gateway weren’t amazing IMO. But when Innova was doing smaller batches it stands to reason that their QC would be better. So I wouldn’t across the board say that older is better, but possibly the correct statement could be that companies with smaller batches have better QC.

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Old 11-03-2018, 10:40 PM
Twmccoy Twmccoy is online now
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Flashing on discs isn't really a new thing. I remember having discs a decade or more ago that had sharp flashing on the bottom.

As for plastic durability, I think older stuff definitely is better. Plastic like Z or champion from about 2005 is some of the best plastic you'll find anywhere.

I have a Nuke that has been in the bag about 5 years now. Plastic looks great and the flight of the disc hasn't changed a bit. I agree that some of the newer champion plastic isn't overly durable. It seems to scuff easily and lose stability.
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Old 11-03-2018, 10:45 PM
ChefKoolaid ChefKoolaid is offline
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Champ plastic is not what it used to be. That said the newest runs of Teebirds ans Shrykes I have seen have been pearly and feel great. I haven't bought any to attest to durability but it looks very promising. I have started throwing Prodigy because their plastic's fantastic.
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Old 11-03-2018, 11:22 PM
Twmccoy Twmccoy is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefKoolaid View Post
Champ plastic is not what it used to be. That said the newest runs of Teebirds ans Shrykes I have seen have been pearly and feel great. I haven't bought any to attest to durability but it looks very promising. I have started throwing Prodigy because their plastic's fantastic.
I like the champ Shryke plastic. The ones I've thrown have been fantastic. I'm NOT liking the current champion Boss plastic. It seems like cheap stuff and has lots of air bubbles in it. The Bosses are coming out flat and overstable.
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Old 11-04-2018, 02:49 AM
Casey 1988 Casey 1988 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twmccoy View Post
Flashing on discs isn't really a new thing. I remember having discs a decade or more ago that had sharp flashing on the bottom.

As for plastic durability, I think older stuff definitely is better. Plastic like Z or champion from about 2005 is some of the best plastic you'll find anywhere.

I have a Nuke that has been in the bag about 5 years now. Plastic looks great and the flight of the disc hasn't changed a bit. I agree that some of the newer champion plastic isn't overly durable. It seems to scuff easily and lose stability.
Yeah I do rember having some DX discs that had flashing in the 2000's, as well as ESP being soft and gummy from 2007 ace race disc to end of 2008.

Now in 2016 I bought bran new one of the No flight number Star Sharks I would assume were made in huge quantity right before Innova put the flight numbers on the disc and it had flashing so bad I had to putt with the disc for an entire round (windy day over 30 mph for wind so I needed a windy day putter) before it was losing the flashing and I could use it for more then just putting. I could only make the Flashing worse on the disc when sanding a little section somehow. Some of the new Z plastic if it has a pearl sheen to the plastic is very durable as I just smashed a tree with a Stalker about a month ago and not a single dent. I think now as opposed to mid 2010's are better for discs with the plastic. In the mid 2010's it seems that Innova and Discraft really did not try with some of the plastics they made like Z and Champion as well as ESP and Star were not as durable as they once were. As of 2016 and now even later the plastics have gotten better in quality from those two brands. Jawbreaker is one of the better putter plastics that in the 2000's was discontinued as Swirl plastic due to the delamination of the plastics in the Swirl as the two plastics did not bond together all that well. Yes now we might have better plastic and worse plastic, just depends on the mold and what plastic they make the disc in. Some molds are made in a plastic they should not anymore as the plastic does not work for that mold of disc. Other discs are not made in a plastic that they should be made in from that company and we know they were made in that plastic and it worked well. Also in the 2000's we did not have some of the brands making discs now, they only popped up in the 2010's.
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Old 11-04-2018, 08:50 AM
elmexdela elmexdela is offline
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no flashing on mvp

also i think z by discraft is indestructible for mids regardless of era

some l64 and innova have remarkably horrid flashing recently
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Old 11-04-2018, 09:07 AM
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zendragon zendragon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elmexdela View Post
no flashing on mvp

also i think z by discraft is indestructible for mids regardless of era

some l64 and innova have remarkably horrid flashing recently
While flashing is less on MVP and in a different spot on the disc, I have had a couple with minor flashing recently. Overall though, their quality seems better when it comes to flashing.

Agree with Lat64. Worst flashing I have seen was on a GL Pure. At some points I would guess it was an 8th of an inch.
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Old 11-04-2018, 09:11 AM
elmexdela elmexdela is offline
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Originally Posted by zendragon View Post
While flashing is less on MVP and in a different spot on the disc, I have had a couple with minor flashing recently. Overall though, their quality seems better when it comes to flashing.

Agree with Lat64. Worst flashing I have seen was on a GL Pure. At some points I would guess it was an 8th of an inch.
i can flick mvps straight off the shelf the flashing isnt going to scrape up my hand

omf i saw 1/8th inch on a river pro i was so excited cuz i enjoyed the river and i picked it up and laughed at how terrible the flashing was and put it back it killed any desire i had to try the river pro if i woulda bought that online i would have been so god damm pissed it was absolutely miserable and im not being melodramatic (for once)

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Old 11-04-2018, 10:42 AM
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keltik keltik is offline
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Plastic chemistry has come up before in other threads. I think a manufacturer or a "rep" came on the thread and said that disc manufacturers don't really have enough market leverage to develop their own blends. It was asserted that disc manufacturers basically get remainders from other customers. I would hazard to guess that automotive component and electronics manufacturers get first dibs on the pellets and develop their own chemistries/blends. IIRC disc companies get to pick from pre-developed blends.

As far as old plastic being better; I guess so. I really like the newer stuff out there. I've had older discs shatter on me. It's just the nature of plastic. They are composite materials and when the plasticizer degrades they become brittle. The first sign is when they get chalky and "finger-printy". Newer blends like G* and JL have more plasticizer (what makes them gummy/tacky). This should ostensibly increase their life span.

Disc flash isn't a function of the plastic; it's a function of the mold set. The mold sets are machined out of either steel or aluminum. I imagine steel to be most prevalent due to the heat generated in the injection molding process. Aluminum is a known heat conductor but its grain structure is so loose it tends to warp and shift with excessive heat. Flash is more prevalent with discs at max weight since the mold is reaching volume capacity. If there are any misfits or mismatches in the mold pieces (or it's a frankenmold), or there is not enough clamping pressure, the hot plastic will shoot out of the gaps. Flash is a common defect in all injection molded parts. Depending on the application flash can be a big issue. Flash is also considered as mold set wrecker.

Injection molding is a tricky process. I seriously doubt most of the manufacturers employ an engineer full time. We're expensive and can be difficult to deal with. All of this points back to our relative size in the market of consumer products. The manufacturers have found their market and have developed their businesses to make money. Certain issues have been deemed less important in regard to getting product to market. Flash appears to be one of them. I do feel however that it is something that doesn't need to be totally overlooked. If they are wrecking molds because of flash they are then seeing extra tooling costs and downtimes because of poor process control. Then we as the market customer are seeing poor products and may start looking elsewhere. It's a vicious cycle...

The link below is about medical devices but applies to frisbees too.

https://www.eirmed-devices.com/overc...ng-challenges/

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