#11  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:50 PM
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wproct wproct is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fmfstartup View Post
Hello,

I am currently in an entrepreneurship class at Iowa State University. For an assignment, we need to talk to target customers within the market of our products. I have a couple of questions. Feel free to answer any of the questions. Thank you so much.

Question 1: What makes you buy one disc over another?

Question 2: Are you frequently losing discs due to wooded areas? What made it difficult to find it? (If you did)

Question 3: Is it easy for you to switch from disc to disc? Why?

Question 4: How much do you justify spending on a long distance driver?


Again, Thank you.

1: Past experience or research on internet.
2: I seldom lose discs as I mostly play solo and have ample time to look. Usually when I lose a disc is because it is in the fall and discs will become buried in leaves and the color of the disc is difficult to see.
3: It is easiest to switch between putters and most difficult on drivers.
4: I like to stay under $16 and very seldom will pay over $22.
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  #12  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:53 PM
Lazerface Lazerface is offline
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Question 1: What makes you buy one disc over another?

If it's a new mold - 2nd hand knowledge and feel in the hand.

Question 2: Are you frequently losing discs due to wooded areas? What made it difficult to find it? (If you did)

No, but fall leaves are the worst if you play in an area like me. changing elevation + large trees = leaf piles.

Question 3: Is it easy for you to switch from disc to disc? Why?

Within my bag, of course because I know the flight of each disc well. If I'm replacing a disc, even if it's the same mold, there is always a transition period. In disc golf the same disc, in the same plastic, in the same weight can fly differently. Disc golfers learn over time how to feel them out and find what they want (dome, stiffness, etc)

Question 4: How much do you justify spending on a long distance driver?

Pricing for discs is pretty flat across all brands. In my market retail for each manufactures premium plastic seems to top out at about $18, so that.
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  #13  
Old 02-13-2018, 04:59 PM
NegaSnapples NegaSnapples is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tripper View Post
I have no idea what any of the pros throw nor do I care particularly (okay I am assuming MJ throws a Comet because of the thread). I have to use a different form than they do due to a torn meniscus so it's not like throwing the same disc would ever yield similar results. I put more stock in advice from my buddy that taught me to play. He knows my throwing style, grip, etc.
Totally, but there are definitely plenty of people out there that put A LOT of stock into what the pros throw. Their sponsors aren't paying them all that money just for fun. They help move a **** load of plastic. I figured I would just let this person know that that is a pretty big factor in the DG market.

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  #14  
Old 02-13-2018, 05:16 PM
edfaits edfaits is offline
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Question 1: What makes you buy one disc over another?
Flight characteristics, weight, how it feels, then it comes down to color and stamp

Question 2: Are you frequently losing discs due to wooded areas? What made it difficult to find it? (If you did)
Some courses more than others... Water seems to get more than wooded courses. Deep muddy water is bad for losing discs. Dense unpenetrable woods is bad in some parts of the country, not so bad here in the northeastern US.

Question 3: Is it easy for you to switch from disc to disc? Why?
Not sure I understand the question... is it easy to switch in say a new driver? I'd always want to do a little field work(Practice) before using a new disc in a tournament.

Question 4: How much do you justify spending on a long distance driver?
$20... I've spent more for fund raiser discs for a worthy cause.
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  #15  
Old 02-13-2018, 05:33 PM
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BogeyNoMore BogeyNoMore is offline
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Question 1: What makes you buy one disc over another? My educated guess about how each of the possible selections will perform for me.

Question 2: Are you frequently losing discs due to wooded areas? No.
What made it difficult to find it? (If you did) Varyring color (Tie dyes) or colors that don't contrast with surroundings.

Question 3: Is it easy for you to switch from disc to disc? Why? Depends on how they differ, and how different the intended purpose is. I can generally switch among similar molds from different manufacturers but not always.

Question 4: How much do you justify spending on a long distance driver? The same amount as any disc... no more/less because it's a distance driver. Probs no more than $16 - $17 premium plastic if new... but I'd rather trade for used but in good condition.

I'd be interested to see how helpful the results you get from this survey actually are.
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  #16  
Old 02-13-2018, 06:18 PM
thirtydirtybirds thirtydirtybirds is offline
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1. Feel first and foremost, flight is a very close second. At this point I really only buy backups for what I throw, occasionally I try a new disc but it’s just for fun.

2. I play almost entirely wooded courses and rarely lose a disc. It’s only lost when you stop looking for it. I think a lot has to do with paying attention to where it lands, and having a brighter color, personally I like red/pink/white/blue for ease of finding them quickly.

3. Not entirely sure what you mean here. If you mean changing out what’s in the bag for something different, then not easy. Consistency is the key to good play, and that includes not changing around the bag too much. That said if I try something out of curiosity and it really woes me, I might try it for a month or so. If you mean switching mold to mold during a round, then it’s just as easy as deciding what line I want to hit.

4. $15. That seems about the average for off the shelf stuff.
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  #17  
Old 02-13-2018, 06:38 PM
DGACESdotCOM DGACESdotCOM is offline
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1. I usually buy something based on how it flies compared to other discs that I already throw.
2. I always go with Orange discs to make them easier to find. I don't often lose them anymore.
3. At this point, yes. Once you figure out your arm speed and what the various discs are going to do, then it's pretty easy to switch.
4. I would try out as much as possible when you are getting used to playing. Buying a driver just to see what it does is going to lead you to spending too much money on discs. Start with slower speeds and don't start throwing speed 14s right off the bat for max distance.
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